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The Iliad and the Odyssey (2 Books in 1) (1000 Copy Limited Edition)

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The Iliad describes the events of the ten-year siege of the city of Troy, by a coalition of Greek states. The story unfolds during a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles. Although the story covers only a few weeks in the final year of the war, the Iliad mentions or alludes to many of the Greek legends about the siege; the earlier events, such as the gath The Iliad describes the events of the ten-year siege of the city of Troy, by a coalition of Greek states. The story unfolds during a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles. Although the story covers only a few weeks in the final year of the war, the Iliad mentions or alludes to many of the Greek legends about the siege; the earlier events, such as the gathering of warriors for the siege, the cause of the war, and related concerns tend to appear near the beginning. Then the epic narrative takes up events prophesied for the future, such as Achilles' looming death and the sack of Troy, prefigured and alluded to more and more vividly, so that when it reaches an end, the poem has told a more or less complete tale of the Trojan War. The Iliad is paired with something of a sequel in The Odyssey. Having spent ten years fighting in the Trojan War, Odysseus embarks on his journey back to Ithica. To get there he must deceive a giant Cyclops, face Poseidon's wrath, escape cannibalism, defeat the witch-goddess Circe, skirt the land of the Sirens, sail between a six-headed monster and a raging whirlpool, and escape captivity on the island of Calypso. But perhaps his biggest threat is his prolonged absence from home, as 108 suitors are vying for his wife's hand in marriage. Both stories were intended to be sung by an epic poet. Along with The Odyssey, The Iliad is among the oldest extant works of Western literature, and its written version is usually dated to around the eighth century BC. In this edition of Samuel Butler's translation, the names of the gods and characters have been restored from Latin to the original Greek. This edition is limited to 1,000 copies.


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The Iliad describes the events of the ten-year siege of the city of Troy, by a coalition of Greek states. The story unfolds during a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles. Although the story covers only a few weeks in the final year of the war, the Iliad mentions or alludes to many of the Greek legends about the siege; the earlier events, such as the gath The Iliad describes the events of the ten-year siege of the city of Troy, by a coalition of Greek states. The story unfolds during a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles. Although the story covers only a few weeks in the final year of the war, the Iliad mentions or alludes to many of the Greek legends about the siege; the earlier events, such as the gathering of warriors for the siege, the cause of the war, and related concerns tend to appear near the beginning. Then the epic narrative takes up events prophesied for the future, such as Achilles' looming death and the sack of Troy, prefigured and alluded to more and more vividly, so that when it reaches an end, the poem has told a more or less complete tale of the Trojan War. The Iliad is paired with something of a sequel in The Odyssey. Having spent ten years fighting in the Trojan War, Odysseus embarks on his journey back to Ithica. To get there he must deceive a giant Cyclops, face Poseidon's wrath, escape cannibalism, defeat the witch-goddess Circe, skirt the land of the Sirens, sail between a six-headed monster and a raging whirlpool, and escape captivity on the island of Calypso. But perhaps his biggest threat is his prolonged absence from home, as 108 suitors are vying for his wife's hand in marriage. Both stories were intended to be sung by an epic poet. Along with The Odyssey, The Iliad is among the oldest extant works of Western literature, and its written version is usually dated to around the eighth century BC. In this edition of Samuel Butler's translation, the names of the gods and characters have been restored from Latin to the original Greek. This edition is limited to 1,000 copies.

30 review for The Iliad and the Odyssey (2 Books in 1) (1000 Copy Limited Edition)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Ἰλιάς ; Ὀδύσσεια = The Iliad and Odyssey, Homer The Iliad is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer. Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles. The Iliad Characters: Ajax, Odysseus, Helen of Troy, Menelaus, Paris, Hector, Achilles, Agamemnon, Aeneas, Sarpedon, Priam, Cassandra, Ἰλιάς ; Ὀδύσσεια = The Iliad and Odyssey, Homer The Iliad is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer. Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles. The Iliad Characters: Ajax, Odysseus, Helen of Troy, Menelaus, Paris, Hector, Achilles, Agamemnon, Aeneas, Sarpedon, Priam, Cassandra, Patroclus, Diomedes, Ajax Oileus, Andromache, Briseis, Hecuba, Nestor, Akhilleus. The Odyssey is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other work ascribed to Homer. The Odyssey is fundamental to the modern Western canon, and is the second-oldest extant work of Western literature; the Iliad is the oldest. Scholars believe the Odyssey was composed near the end of the 8th century BC, somewhere in Ionia, the Greek coastal region of Anatolia. The Odyssey Characters: Odysseus, Penelope, Helen of Troy, Achilles, Agamemnon, Telemachus, Minerva, Polyphemus تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز نخست ماه دسامبر سال 2009میلادی عنوان: ایلیاد و اودیسه (ادیسه)؛ هومر؛ مترجم: سعید نفیسی؛ تهران، هرمس، 1387، در 1005ص، شابک 9789643634568؛ این کتاب پیشتر با برگردان همین مترجم با دو عنوان جداگانه «ایلیاد» و «ادیسه» نیز چاپ شده است آثار بر جای مانده از «هومر»، دو گلچین شعر به نام‌های «ایلیاد» و «ادیسه» هستند؛ همه‌ ی آنچه که درباره ی تاریخ و افسانه‌ های یونان باستان می‌دانیم، از همین شعرها برگرفته شده‌؛ در «ایلیاد»، «هومر» داستان جنگ «تروا» را، و در «ادیسه» ده سال سفر «ادیسئوس» در بازگشت از جنگ «تروا» را میسرایند.؛ ...؛ تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 29/08/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ 01/06/1400هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    André Neves

    I read it when was in school and it was obligatory Portuguese subject reading. I tried a second reading and decided to give another opportunity to this masterpiece and I really really enjoyed it even more than the first time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lucinda Reed-Nowland

    The best story ever-it has everything-love, romance, war, brave, handsome men, exotic places, monsters, beautiful women-its all in these two stories. Odysseus is my all-time favorite hero, and although he is a brave hero, he has his faults and it's this combination that makes him so lovable and what makes this story one of the greatest of all time. The text can be difficult to read, and following the who's who of the gods and goddesses can be quite a feat. I've read it several times, I never get The best story ever-it has everything-love, romance, war, brave, handsome men, exotic places, monsters, beautiful women-its all in these two stories. Odysseus is my all-time favorite hero, and although he is a brave hero, he has his faults and it's this combination that makes him so lovable and what makes this story one of the greatest of all time. The text can be difficult to read, and following the who's who of the gods and goddesses can be quite a feat. I've read it several times, I never get tired of it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    Other than the gruesome, violent images often presented in magnificent detail (hey, it is a war!), I really enjoy reading Homer's epic poem. Where else are we given such insight into stubborn Agamemnon, noble Hector, intelligent and well-spoken Odysseus, lazy and spineless Paris, guilt-ridden Helen, the wrath of the warrior Achille's and how vain he can be? We can identify with Trojan and Greek alike, agonizing with both sides over the destructiveness of war. We get the inside story on all the G Other than the gruesome, violent images often presented in magnificent detail (hey, it is a war!), I really enjoy reading Homer's epic poem. Where else are we given such insight into stubborn Agamemnon, noble Hector, intelligent and well-spoken Odysseus, lazy and spineless Paris, guilt-ridden Helen, the wrath of the warrior Achille's and how vain he can be? We can identify with Trojan and Greek alike, agonizing with both sides over the destructiveness of war. We get the inside story on all the Greek and Trojan heroes and what makes them tick. And best of all, we get a behind-the-scenes, humorous look at the Greek gods; their strengths, weaknesses and all the squabbles and fuss that take place between them. The Iliad is really incomplete without The Odyssey, so I will be reading and reviewing that book as well. I had read a synopsis of the adventures of Odysseus in high school, but it was nice to read the entire epic poem to get the full story. Odysseus is an intelligent, cunning hero and you are really rooting for him by the time he finally makes it home from his long journey and is ready to take action against the usurpers of his household. So many stories of this time period end in tragedy, it's nice that there is a satisfactory end to Odysseus's story after so many years of pain and heartache for him and his family. I enjoyed The Odyssey more than The Iliad because it seems a more intimate story overall. We really come to know the man Odysseus, his son Telemachus and wife, Penelope through their thoughts and interactions with others. The Iliad takes place during the Trojan war and focuses on the Greek and Trojan warriors and what takes place on the battlefield. The Odyssey is not quite a continuation of the Iliad, but takes place 10 years after the end of the Trojan war from which the great warrior Odysseus never returned. It seems he had some trouble on the high seas and on various islands along the way and has been unable to make it home. In the meantime, his home has been invaded by suitors who think he is dead and want to marry Penelope. Telemachus is not strong or powerful enough to throw them out and goes on a journey to find news of his father. With the help of the gods, Odysseus and Telemachus are finally able to defend their home. I would recommend reading both The Iliad and Odyssey together but if you're only going to pick up one, read The Odyssey.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    It didn't take me long to figure out that I'm not a Homer girl. I think the problem was partly that after years of taking in entertaining, probably dumbed down versions of the stories, the reality ended up a bit of a let down. Another problem was I had trouble liking any of the characters. Achilles? Hector? Even Odysseus? Ugh! Whiney, deceitful, and not very likeable! The Iliad was pretty painful to get through. I forced myself to finish and didn't even get a payoff in the end. What happened to T It didn't take me long to figure out that I'm not a Homer girl. I think the problem was partly that after years of taking in entertaining, probably dumbed down versions of the stories, the reality ended up a bit of a let down. Another problem was I had trouble liking any of the characters. Achilles? Hector? Even Odysseus? Ugh! Whiney, deceitful, and not very likeable! The Iliad was pretty painful to get through. I forced myself to finish and didn't even get a payoff in the end. What happened to Troy?! Andromache?! Priam?! The Iliad won't tell you! The sacking of Troy is alluded to in the Odyssey with a brief overview of the Trojan Horse and the men hiding in it. That's it! The Odyssey was better than the Iliad, maybe 2 stars. I have a bit of a complex now that I've read the books and not liked them. I consider myself a fairly intelligent person, but I just couldn't connect with these classic works of literature that have been read by, and enjoyed by countless people for centuries.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Keivan

    The translation was pretty readable. This is part of the Great Books of the western world Collection that I have set out to read. Ulysses is my favorite Greek hero.Always was always will be. I read parts of some butchered version in high-school but this one seems to have satisfied my goddess needs. I think we perhaps need some revitalization of the sentiments present in these books to save America from going down the cultural tubes. When the Odyssey is replaced with the "jersey Shore" cannot possi The translation was pretty readable. This is part of the Great Books of the western world Collection that I have set out to read. Ulysses is my favorite Greek hero.Always was always will be. I read parts of some butchered version in high-school but this one seems to have satisfied my goddess needs. I think we perhaps need some revitalization of the sentiments present in these books to save America from going down the cultural tubes. When the Odyssey is replaced with the "jersey Shore" cannot possibley turn out well. How could i rate such a classic any less than 5 stars!?

  7. 5 out of 5

    ✨Bean's Books✨

    It's a damn Greek tragedy! The Iliad takes us through the battle of Troy and the Greek invasion. We are able to Marvel at great warriors like Hector and Achilles. We are able to hear of their struggles and their woes and eventually their deaths. The Odyssey takes us through the 10-year struggle to return home after the Trojan War has ended. Odysseus battles mystical creatures and the Wrath of the Gods as he tries desperately to come back home to his throne. Homer is definitely a master of the Greek It's a damn Greek tragedy! The Iliad takes us through the battle of Troy and the Greek invasion. We are able to Marvel at great warriors like Hector and Achilles. We are able to hear of their struggles and their woes and eventually their deaths. The Odyssey takes us through the 10-year struggle to return home after the Trojan War has ended. Odysseus battles mystical creatures and the Wrath of the Gods as he tries desperately to come back home to his throne. Homer is definitely a master of the Greek epic. His writing resembles that of a playwright of modern day and even harkens back to a bit of Shakespearean feeling in the emotion of the characters. This is definitely a classic for the ages and in my opinion one that should be read once by everyone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gizem-in-Wonderland

    This is the war that started it all. The legend that became a culture, converted into fiction, comic books and movies. The most meaningless yet brutal war that took two decades, thousands of good men and gods wasted their everything to become a part of. This is the one and only: Iliad and Odyssey. Iliad ⭐⭐⭐ “Any moment might be our last. Everything is more beautiful because we're doomed. You will never be lovelier than you are now. We will never be here again.” Iliad was a confusing, brutal and unn This is the war that started it all. The legend that became a culture, converted into fiction, comic books and movies. The most meaningless yet brutal war that took two decades, thousands of good men and gods wasted their everything to become a part of. This is the one and only: Iliad and Odyssey. Iliad ⭐⭐⭐ “Any moment might be our last. Everything is more beautiful because we're doomed. You will never be lovelier than you are now. We will never be here again.” Iliad was a confusing, brutal and unnecessary. It all started over Helen, who is abducted against her will and brought to Troy. Then hell broke, the armies of best men of the time are gathered while Gods gathered their strength and choose their sides. The battle was too weird to even to mention; when you think it’s about to end, a God or Goddess interferes and yet another day ends with a ceasefire, another chapter wasted on nothing. The book opens with the conflict between Achilles and Agamemnon over trophy women taken from Troy. That is the point Greeks lose their champion warrior, who sit sulking until the end while the others try to survive. Everybody -both mortal and immortal- is too tense, stubborn and play tricks to win. They are often disguised as somebody else, burn thigh bones and create hecatombs to lure Gods in order to win this endless war that took 10 years. By the time they were done, everybody had already forgotten why they were there. The war is fought “one step forward, two step backs” thanks to all mighty immortals, who just cannot let mere humans deal with their own problems. Though sometimes frustrating, it was entertaining to watch how even the simplest of issues may lead to war and destruction; Gods acting like humans and cannot control emotions, everyone in power manipulating and stipulating while war is fought by mere foot soldiers. The most disappointing part of this book was the ending and that there’s no mention of the wooden horse (The famous Trojan horse!). The best part is that now I can relate to most works of mythological fiction and many attributions to this ancient classic literature. Odyssey ⭐⭐⭐⭐ “Man is the vainest of all creatures that have their being upon earth.” Odyssey is yet another frustrating never-ending journey made Odyssey (Ulysses) regret surviving the Trojan War. Well, everybody either dead at war or on the road back home, Odyssey finds himself catapulting between islands with a bunch of men, who makes you question how the hell they did not manage to die in the battlefield. Gods, sirens, titans all fixate on our hero on his return journey; either helping him or trying to kill him. While at home the son and wife of Odyssey cry their eyes out waiting for him to return, which eventually takes about 10 years. This tale reminded me of the adventures of Sinbad from Arabian Tales, the misfortunes and lack of luck never cease to stop until he find a safe passage home. Yet another war waits for him at home, for tens of hundreds of suitors are camped outside to marry his wife Penelope and take the throne of Ithaca. I have to admit I enjoyed the return journey much better the war, the aftermath of Troy and how the survivors ended up. There’s only cursory, tiny little mention of the horse that sealed the fate of the war, which led to yet another disappointment on my side. Overall, an overwhelming, exhausting and pain-in-the-arse kind of book yet an entertaining must-read, love-or-hate kind of classic literature.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Rollins

    I am reading this to two sets of students and it never gets old. My only complaint is that the Provensons left out Argos. I do believe it is the best children's Homer I have read. I love the chapter breakdowns which are almost parallel to the poems. The Provensons never disappoint, do they? I am reading this to two sets of students and it never gets old. My only complaint is that the Provensons left out Argos. I do believe it is the best children's Homer I have read. I love the chapter breakdowns which are almost parallel to the poems. The Provensons never disappoint, do they?

  10. 4 out of 5

    max theodore

    okay i miiiiight actually dnf this by which i mean... mark it as finished without reading the odyssey part. because as cool as this edition is, visually (gold pages!!!), it's in prose, and reading the iliad in poetry has made me realize that - holy shit, guys - an epic poem should probably be read in poetry! or at least it's more fun that way for me. gary i need a non-prose odyssey etc etc anyway shoutout to my brother for letting me borrow this in the first place okay i miiiiight actually dnf this by which i mean... mark it as finished without reading the odyssey part. because as cool as this edition is, visually (gold pages!!!), it's in prose, and reading the iliad in poetry has made me realize that - holy shit, guys - an epic poem should probably be read in poetry! or at least it's more fun that way for me. gary i need a non-prose odyssey etc etc anyway shoutout to my brother for letting me borrow this in the first place

  11. 5 out of 5

    1marcus

    The “Iliad and the Odyssey” keeps you on the edge of your seat from the beginning of the story to the end. I’m not into books like this one but I LOVED this book. The adventure, mystery, and the understanding of pre-history are great for anyone who wants to read this book. All these things made me want to read the book over again and even write a book review on it. First the adventure is wild from the start. Fighting the Cyclopes and winning made me think that no matter what the size of the pers The “Iliad and the Odyssey” keeps you on the edge of your seat from the beginning of the story to the end. I’m not into books like this one but I LOVED this book. The adventure, mystery, and the understanding of pre-history are great for anyone who wants to read this book. All these things made me want to read the book over again and even write a book review on it. First the adventure is wild from the start. Fighting the Cyclopes and winning made me think that no matter what the size of the person or object I can win if I put my mind to it and want it bad enough. Adventure keeps me reading the book. If the book doesn’t have adventure I will close the book and go do something else with my time but I didn’t have to do that once with this book. Next the mystery keeps you guessing you think you know hats going to happen but you don’t. The author “Homer” does a great job of that this makes one keep reading and keep guessing until you get to the end the story. If you know what’s going to happen in the story why keep reading the book that would be a waste of time you can go do something else with your time like go outside and work on your jump shot or something like that. Never will you have to do that with this book. Last the understanding of the pre-history is good for one if they are trying to learn about ancient history. One person said “The "Odyssey" is a magnificent piece of literature that we find absolutely spectacular in the fact of its potential for helping us understand pre-history of many ancient cultures, and because of the fact that it is so well written and perhaps one of the first "books" (epics) ever written down. We hope that you find Homer's "Odyssey" enjoyable whether you are reading it for school, for study, or for pleasure.”(http://library.thinkquest.org/19300/d...) After reading the book I knew so much about ancient history I passed all my test with all A’s with no problem In conclusion I hope my three reasons have you wanting to read this book. The adventure, mystery, and the understanding of pre-history are great for anyone who wants to read this book. Now I have informed you about the book now it’s up to you to see what are you going to do either read this great book or just go on with your life ignorant. What will you do

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elsa K

    3.5 I only read "The Odyssey" this time through. I haven't read it since high school and have been wanting to read it again. It is obviously well written and a classic. The 'legend/epic' style is different from what I normally read, but I enjoyed it. As a female though I couldn't help but get annoyed with Odysseus sleeping with goddesses etc. while Penelope is pining away for him. Although, I also got annoyed at Penelope's inability to send the suitors away, so maybe they were meant for each oth 3.5 I only read "The Odyssey" this time through. I haven't read it since high school and have been wanting to read it again. It is obviously well written and a classic. The 'legend/epic' style is different from what I normally read, but I enjoyed it. As a female though I couldn't help but get annoyed with Odysseus sleeping with goddesses etc. while Penelope is pining away for him. Although, I also got annoyed at Penelope's inability to send the suitors away, so maybe they were meant for each other? Some of the fighting scenes got too gruesome for me. Also, why is Athena so committed to Odysseus? I started reading "Anna Karenina" in the middle of it and kind of had to force myself to finish this one. Still an enjoyable read that everyone should be familiar with.

  13. 5 out of 5

    David Withun

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  14. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Well, after hearing of the Iliad and the Odyssey for my entire life through the miasma of culture, media, and that one primary school teacher who, to my memory, taught me nothing but greek myth (big up Miss Fahey), I finally got around to reading them. Well, kind of. Reading stories this old is like saying you finally heard Bohemian Rhapsody, but it was played by some guy in a pub who heard another guy describe it (admitantly, really well) on the radio from the time his dad played it for him aft Well, after hearing of the Iliad and the Odyssey for my entire life through the miasma of culture, media, and that one primary school teacher who, to my memory, taught me nothing but greek myth (big up Miss Fahey), I finally got around to reading them. Well, kind of. Reading stories this old is like saying you finally heard Bohemian Rhapsody, but it was played by some guy in a pub who heard another guy describe it (admitantly, really well) on the radio from the time his dad played it for him after hearing a woman sing it in a talent show after she heard it from etc. etc. etc. etc. Homer Looking at His Writing Credits We call the author 'Homer', but from the original story, how much of Homer's work is actually Homer? How much of Homer was the OG Homer? Do we even know if any of Homer's words even survived the subsequent changes the other Homers added to the text? And what about the text? Do we count the person who first put it to paper as a 'Homer'? Or are they just counted as translators? And what about translators?? These are too many questions to sift through and I'm no where near qualified enough to answer any of them so I'm not getting involved in that whole nebulous "oral tradition" malarky, it's irrelevant as I can only judge what I have read in this here collection of words that made up two long (but brilliant) poems. All the points I have about these epics, positive and negative, stem from the literary collection that I imbibed. So here is what I think of that pysical thing that I bought which had two epic poems called The Iliad and The Odyssey, which were both written down onto the page by some guy other than Homer, then Translated by another dude who also wasn't Homer, and read by a guy who really isn't Homer. I'm talking about that. Oh! And to make it even more confusing, I listened to them via audiobook. Yeah, this review is already a mess... The Iliad: Hot Take "Like a girl, a baby running after her mother, begging to be picked up, and she tugs on her skirts, holding her back as she tries to hurry off—all tears, fawning up at her, till she takes her in her arms… That’s how you look, Patroclus, streaming live tears." So, when I finished the Iliad I made a joke that what Homer had written really was the foundation of storytelling because he wrote the Iliad before endings were invented. *ba-dum-tiss* For those who don't understand, the Iliad does not include the fall of Troy, the wooden horse, nor even the death of Achilles. They're all (save for the wooden horse) alluded to, foreshadowed, and set up throughout the poem, but they're not described or shown. Long story short; no pay off. The poem ends before any of that occurs. Now I hear you say, "but Tom, that's not what the Iliad was about! It was about Achilles, his argument with Agamemnon, and his rage at the death of Patroclus. Everyone knows all of that is going to happen anyhow, you don't need to show it." Yes, granted, Achilles' plot is integral to the story, and all of those points are valid. BUT The structure and time given to the overarching plot of the war, its soldiers and its greater surroundings, not to mention the battle between the gods, is left unfinished. For HUGE swathes of the poem, we were brought inside battles, raids, plans for tearing down walls, loss of naval escape routes, people's families back home and debts that are forever left unpaid and crimes that are left unresolved due to the actions and the bloodshed of the trojan war. This story arc takes up a greater proportion of the poem than Achilles' arc does, and it's left unresovled. Hell, I'd even argue Achilles' arc is left unresolved. The poem ends with him recieving the glory deserved to him from gods, enacting his revenge on Hector, giving a funeral for Patroclus, and giving Hector's body back to his father, the king. But what it doesn't show is him paying for all of these great deeds with his own death, a death that every immortal being, including Achilles' own mother, won't stop talking about. It would be like ending the play 'Dr. Faustus' with him becoming the greatest magician in the world, and as the punters are leaving the theatre telling them, "Oh obviously he goes to hell after this. Everyone could see that coming!" Many will disagree, and that's fair, but in my view that's a poorly structured pay-off and it hindered my enjoyment of the poem, hence my rating it 2/5 stars. The Odyssey: the Comeback of the Millennia Aw man, what a recovery. What. A. Recovery. Both for Odysseus, and for Homer. This poem has everything, non-linear storytelling, cyclopses, dead mothers, unrelenting suitors, domestic abuse, a thirsty goddess stuck on paradise island, Odysseus crying like all the time and as soon as he gets home he tells his son not to be such a woman. What a ride, what a change in the quality of structure, everything is remembered and tied off with a neat bow. Whichever Homer that was in charge of taking care of the Odyssey did a stellar job. I actually have no complaints - save for the rampant woman hating in the poem, obviously. I mean Odysseus had all of his female servants who slept/ were raped by the suitors lynched at the end, which has NOT aged well. Then again, this story is older than the written word so you can't blame it for being outdated at times. 5/5 stars Conclusion Despite my faults found with the Iliad, I'd still suggest reading it. It's a brilliant poem and so many turns of phrase have stemmed from its writing, not only that, the descriptions of the battles are of mid 2000s anime levels of scale and hype proportions. At one point Achilles fights a fucking RIVER and WINS. I will say that the Iliad is an unfinished text, and you need to read both together for a completion. To me, they're two sides to the same aegean coin, and you NEED the Odyssey to pick up the slack that the Iliad drops. Overall: 4/5 stars

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (Harmonybites)

    Together these two works attributed to Homer are considered among the oldest surviving works of Western literature, dating to probably the eighth century BCE, and are certainly among the most influential. I can't believe I once found Homer boring. In my defense, I was a callow teen, and having a book assigned in school often tends to perversely make you hate it. But then I had a "Keats conversion experience." Keats famously wrote a poem in tribute to a translation of Homer by Chapman who, Keats Together these two works attributed to Homer are considered among the oldest surviving works of Western literature, dating to probably the eighth century BCE, and are certainly among the most influential. I can't believe I once found Homer boring. In my defense, I was a callow teen, and having a book assigned in school often tends to perversely make you hate it. But then I had a "Keats conversion experience." Keats famously wrote a poem in tribute to a translation of Homer by Chapman who, Keats wrote, opened to him "realms of gold." My Chapman was Fitzgerald, although on a reread of The Odyssey I tried the Fagles translation and really enjoyed it. Obviously, the translation is key if you're not reading in the original Greek, and I recommend looking at several side by side to see which one best suits. A friend of mine who is a classicist says she prefers The Illiad--that she thinks it the more mature book. The Illiad deals with just a few weeks in the last year of the decade-long Trojan War. As the opening lines state, it deals with how the quarrel between the Greek's great hero Achilles and their leader Agamemnon "caused the Akhaians loss on bitter loss and crowded brave souls into the undergloom." So, essentially, The Illiad is a war story. One close to three thousand years old with a mindset very alien to ours. One where unending glory was seen as a great good over personal survival or family. One where all felt that their ends were fated. And one with curiously human, or at least petty, gods. Some see the work as jingoistic, even pro-war, and I suppose it can be read that way, but what struck me was the compassion with which Homer wrote of both sides. We certainly care for the Trojan Hector as much as or more (in my case much more) than for the sulky and explosive Achilles. For the Trojan King Priam as much or more (in my case much more) than King Agamemnon. Homer certainly doesn't obscure the pity, the waste, and the grief war brings. And there are plenty of scenes in the work that I found unforgettable: The humorous scene where Aphrodite is wounded and driven from the field. The moving scene between Hector and his wife and child. The grief Helen feels in losing a friend. The confrontation between Priam and Achilles. I do love The Illiad, but I'd give The Odyssey a slight edge. Even just reading general Greek mythology, Odysseus was always a favorite, because unlike figures such as Achilles or Heracles he succeeded on his wits, not muscle. It's true, on this reread, especially in contrast to say The Illiad's Hector, I do see Odysseus' dark side. The man is a pirate and at times rash, hot-tempered, even vicious. But I do feel for his pining for home and The Odyssey is filled with such a wealth of incident--the Cyclops, Circe, Scylla and Charybdis, the Sirens--and especially Hades, the forerunner of Dante's Hell. And though my friend is right that the misogynist ancient Greek culture isn't where you go for strong heroines, I love Penelope; described as the "matchless queen of cunning," she's a worthy match for the crafty Odysseus. The series of recognition scenes on Ithaca are especially moving and memorable--I think my favorite and the most poignant being that of Odysseus' dog Argos. Epic poems about 2,700 years old, in the right translation both works can nevertheless speak to me more eloquently than many a contemporary novel.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elena Sinagra

    After reading “The Song of Achilles” I found a new interest in Ancient Greece, as well as the myths and stories that go along with it. “The Iliad and the Odyssey” is as much about history and collective humanity as it is about the actual story of the Trojan War and Odysseus’s voyage home. Although at times difficult to read and tiring, it is a timeless piece of literature that has inspired countless other great works of art. Odysseus has survived the Trojan War and the perilous journey back to I After reading “The Song of Achilles” I found a new interest in Ancient Greece, as well as the myths and stories that go along with it. “The Iliad and the Odyssey” is as much about history and collective humanity as it is about the actual story of the Trojan War and Odysseus’s voyage home. Although at times difficult to read and tiring, it is a timeless piece of literature that has inspired countless other great works of art. Odysseus has survived the Trojan War and the perilous journey back to Ithaca. He, however, finds life difficult after the voyage. This reminds me of Joseph Campbell’s “The Hero with a Thousand Faces”, where he argues that the mythological hero doesn’t just have to just survive whatever trial he/she went through, but also has to return home and share what has been learned.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    September 5th, 2016 3 stars. Finished the Iliad! Finally done. *I've read it for my Foreign literature class. It took me a month, and not because it was boring or anything (although some chapters were less exciting than others), it's just really hard to read because of the metre - hexameter. Not a natural metre for a Russian poetry, so it was unusual. But I did like this book. Especially all those gruesome descriptions of death. It was sort of fascinating. Also I did like a lot of the characters - September 5th, 2016 3 stars. Finished the Iliad! Finally done. *I've read it for my Foreign literature class. It took me a month, and not because it was boring or anything (although some chapters were less exciting than others), it's just really hard to read because of the metre - hexameter. Not a natural metre for a Russian poetry, so it was unusual. But I did like this book. Especially all those gruesome descriptions of death. It was sort of fascinating. Also I did like a lot of the characters - Andromache, Achilles, Hector, Patroklos. There was not much of a beginning or an ending to this story, but Homer truly was a genius of epic poems, even though a lot of people agree he was just a generalized character.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bob Baen

    I’ve finished The Iliad only. I’m saving The Odyssey for another time. I thought the translation and narration were very good. There are so many characters in these stories, it was sometimes difficult for me to remember the backgrounds of all of the players and to follow the timeline. I’m the one deficient in this regard. I need to increase my knowledge of all of these Greek myths and the participants. Part of my sometimes confusion was probably because I binge listened to this while traveling. I’ve finished The Iliad only. I’m saving The Odyssey for another time. I thought the translation and narration were very good. There are so many characters in these stories, it was sometimes difficult for me to remember the backgrounds of all of the players and to follow the timeline. I’m the one deficient in this regard. I need to increase my knowledge of all of these Greek myths and the participants. Part of my sometimes confusion was probably because I binge listened to this while traveling. This is an important part of our literature and the world’s culture. I need to spend more time reading about it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eva

    28/04/2018 I've been reading the Oddysey with a book club and I must say that added a lot to my reading experience. I noticed more, I laughed more, I analysed more. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book and I'm happy I've done so. I don't have a rating, because it feels wrong to rate a book that has been around for over 2000 years. Who am I in comparison? ----------------------------- 6/12/2018 We've now seen The Illiad in class. That means I've read parts of it in Ancient Greek and parts in Dutch. 28/04/2018 I've been reading the Oddysey with a book club and I must say that added a lot to my reading experience. I noticed more, I laughed more, I analysed more. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book and I'm happy I've done so. I don't have a rating, because it feels wrong to rate a book that has been around for over 2000 years. Who am I in comparison? ----------------------------- 6/12/2018 We've now seen The Illiad in class. That means I've read parts of it in Ancient Greek and parts in Dutch. I've seen the entire story in detail, so I consider it read. We'll see The Oddyssey in class next semester, so I'll also read parts of it in the original Greek. I have read the entire thing in Dutch already.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Azita Rassi

    Five stars to the Odyssey and 2.5 to the Iliad to be exact. I was very bored with the who-killed-whom parts in the Iliad. Fitzgerald’s translation of the Odyssey is nowhere as good as Emily Wilson’s although it is still a very powerful translation. Dan Stevens’s narration really brought it to life. I hope an audiobook of Ms. Wilson’s translation is made soon as well. No matter how many times I read or watch or hear the story of Hector’s death, it makes me sad all over again. Man-eating war indee Five stars to the Odyssey and 2.5 to the Iliad to be exact. I was very bored with the who-killed-whom parts in the Iliad. Fitzgerald’s translation of the Odyssey is nowhere as good as Emily Wilson’s although it is still a very powerful translation. Dan Stevens’s narration really brought it to life. I hope an audiobook of Ms. Wilson’s translation is made soon as well. No matter how many times I read or watch or hear the story of Hector’s death, it makes me sad all over again. Man-eating war indeed.

  21. 5 out of 5

    ♥Mary♦Sweet♣Dreams♠Are♥Made♦of♣This♠

    I really enjoyed reading Homer's Odyssey and Iliad. I actually read this book of my own volition and not because I had to for school. The stories are very unique and captivating. You'll be sitting on the edge of your chair. I recommend this book to anyone who likes mythology of any kind. I enjoyed it so much that I believe I'll give it another read after so many years and an adequate review. I really enjoyed reading Homer's Odyssey and Iliad. I actually read this book of my own volition and not because I had to for school. The stories are very unique and captivating. You'll be sitting on the edge of your chair. I recommend this book to anyone who likes mythology of any kind. I enjoyed it so much that I believe I'll give it another read after so many years and an adequate review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cedric

    Oh hell. I thought I was an intelligent human being until I tried to read this. I think I'm going to go back to picture books now. Oh hell. I thought I was an intelligent human being until I tried to read this. I think I'm going to go back to picture books now.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sali-steady-read

    Couldn't finish it, that's a pity! Lost track of the story as the time gap grew larger... But I may reread it one day as I enjoyed it pretty much. Couldn't finish it, that's a pity! Lost track of the story as the time gap grew larger... But I may reread it one day as I enjoyed it pretty much.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    Iliad This was so graphically violent. If it weren't for the language I would've thought I was reading the screenplay for a 21st-century movie. I had no idea! Gore aside, this was difficult for me to get through because nothing much happens other than fighting. Even most of the tangential stories are about older fights! The plot seemed to drag on longer than necessary, but I did feel for doomed Hector and marvel at Achilles' ability to hold deep, vengeful grudges. And oh, the fickle gods! Rather Iliad This was so graphically violent. If it weren't for the language I would've thought I was reading the screenplay for a 21st-century movie. I had no idea! Gore aside, this was difficult for me to get through because nothing much happens other than fighting. Even most of the tangential stories are about older fights! The plot seemed to drag on longer than necessary, but I did feel for doomed Hector and marvel at Achilles' ability to hold deep, vengeful grudges. And oh, the fickle gods! Rather than trying to keep track of all the mortals and all the gods I just held onto which side was winning/losing, which served me well enough. At the end... no mention of the famed horse! I was quite confused. The story also assumes you know how and why Helen was taken (which I didn't), which didn't get in the way so much but did puzzle me because I wondered - How did we get that story? Anyway, since the main drama was around the sides gaining and losing the upper hand, not having that context wasn't fatal. Odyssey I read a review by someone who said they enjoyed the Odyssey much more than the Iliad. That helped me get through the interminable fight scenes in the Iliad, and I was rewarded! Although I also felt like the storyline here was drawn out - perhaps my modern brain is far too accustomed to faster payoffs - I loved hearing about each leg of Odysseus' journey and his dramatic homecoming. There were so many exciting - and also shockingly gory! - tales, and I rooted for Odysseus to get home all the way. I was horrified by the treatment Penelope endured from her suitors, but the alternating of stories/perspectives between hers and Telemachus' household and Odysseus' progress homeward kept things interesting. *** Overall I'm glad to have read these epics. It was fun to imagine the world of the ancient Greeks and learn about their culture (eg. grasping knees for mercy; showing generous hospitality before even learning a guest's name; mistrust and disregard for women). It was also fun to recognise so many aphorisms and realise how long they've been in use. Another plus is that now I've got a general understanding of Greek mythology. I'm amazed that the Greeks worshipped such deceiving, changeable, selfish and unreliable beings (although it makes sense if they're fashioned after humanity). I'm sure I moved faster and enjoyed my reading even more thanks to the masterful narration of Anthony Heald. He had great voices for all the characters and added a lot of colour to each scene. If you're considering reading these definitely go for it! Even without studying them in a class I can see how they've influenced storytelling, media, and our ideas of heroism, success, and setting and achieving goals.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Megha Chakraborty

    "Of all creatures that breathe and move upon the earth, nothing is bred that is weaker than man." -The Odyssey. The Iliad and the Odyssey are two books that I have always wanted to read. Luckily I found a hardbound version and translated by Samuel Butler. In The Iliad, Greeks are marching to war backed by legendary greek hereos like Achilles, Menelaus, Ulysses as well as their leader Agamemnon amongst others. They fight back and forth with the Trojans in front of the cities great walls. All this h "Of all creatures that breathe and move upon the earth, nothing is bred that is weaker than man." -The Odyssey. The Iliad and the Odyssey are two books that I have always wanted to read. Luckily I found a hardbound version and translated by Samuel Butler. In The Iliad, Greeks are marching to war backed by legendary greek hereos like Achilles, Menelaus, Ulysses as well as their leader Agamemnon amongst others. They fight back and forth with the Trojans in front of the cities great walls. All this happened because Prince Paris ran away with Helen Menelaus beautiful wife. Gods are interfering with each situation, usually to please their own greedy agendas. This causes a lot of political bickering, an impressive amount of bloodshed and some fairly exciting storytelling. We can see how The Gods manipulate human at times giving them power and at times snatching everything from them. There are no good or bad sides, they are just fighting. The Odyssey is a much more intricate tale. The story follows Ulysses as he tries to make his way home after the destruction of Troy. The story legend finds himself in a lot of unusual situations, most of which are caused by his crew's selfishness and stupidity. There's a lot of interesting situations with grumpy mythological creatures and the immortal Greek Gods. Whilst all this is going on, back home his son Telemachus is struggling to fend off suitors who are looking to marry his mother Penelope in Ulysees absence. In the end, of course, the hero returns and solves everything. Both the story conveys how flawed humans are and for power and money they can be manipulated easily. It was a complete page-turner for me and I really enjoyed reading it. It's an important book. The translation is flawless, some might find it a little weird, but it gets better once you are into it. Highly recommended. Happy Reading!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Just finished The Iliad and The Odyssey by Homer. My (slightly cynical) description of each in one sentence: The Iliad: Lots of fighting and killing to hide the fact it is about the love of two men, Achilles and Patroclus, with Achilles going on a rampage when Patroclus is slain. The Odyssey: a much too long, albeit well-written, saga of the return of Odysseus, who could have revealed himself in three seconds but chose to torture his family, and the reader, for far too long.

  27. 5 out of 5

    maireads

    So Greek mythology is very interesting buttttttttt I only read this so I can read The Song of Achilles, and after I finished the Iliad I forgot everything so is it worth reading? Yes. Will I read it again? No

  28. 5 out of 5

    strategian

    While the contrast of the two, one after the other, is very interesting I can't say I'd be likely to ever read The Iliad again. The Odyssey though works very well rendered here as prose and more fully fulfills the classic expectation of what a Greek adventure story should be. While the contrast of the two, one after the other, is very interesting I can't say I'd be likely to ever read The Iliad again. The Odyssey though works very well rendered here as prose and more fully fulfills the classic expectation of what a Greek adventure story should be.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Friend of Pixie

    Logan already knew some of these adventures from the excellent recorded reading by Benedict Flynn The Adventures of Odysseus. But I happened on this copy at a used-books shop in Cannon Beach and had to have it because in 1975, my mother gave me "Myths and Legends" Golden Treasury of Myths and Legends Adapted from the World's Great Classics illustrated by the same couple and I loved the pictures. Logan loved the stories and recommends it to "anyone who likes battles really, because there are lots Logan already knew some of these adventures from the excellent recorded reading by Benedict Flynn The Adventures of Odysseus. But I happened on this copy at a used-books shop in Cannon Beach and had to have it because in 1975, my mother gave me "Myths and Legends" Golden Treasury of Myths and Legends Adapted from the World's Great Classics illustrated by the same couple and I loved the pictures. Logan loved the stories and recommends it to "anyone who likes battles really, because there are lots and lots of them." Well, yes. Only too true. Luckily, only the "bad guys and mosters" die. Watson does a good job maintaining the antique sound of the language, while still making it understandable for younger readers.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Greg Pitts

    After being force-fed this epic poem in school I was stunned by how much I loved it! I don't even know who's translation I first read, but I've read The Iliad twice since, and Fagles' translation is the best yet. Beautiful imagery and really exciting battle scenes (really!) explaining the loyalties of The Gods and their favorites on Earth. This book is not a chore like we have been led to believe. Trust me, I don't go out seeking ancient Greek poems. But this is great stuff and Fagles' translati After being force-fed this epic poem in school I was stunned by how much I loved it! I don't even know who's translation I first read, but I've read The Iliad twice since, and Fagles' translation is the best yet. Beautiful imagery and really exciting battle scenes (really!) explaining the loyalties of The Gods and their favorites on Earth. This book is not a chore like we have been led to believe. Trust me, I don't go out seeking ancient Greek poems. But this is great stuff and Fagles' translation led me to buy his Homer's Odyssey to read it for the first time. Simply beautiful! This stuff can get violent so steel yourselves. I was so impressed and moved by his translations I tried to email Dr. Fagles to let him know, only to find out that, sadly, he had passed away a few months earlier. If you have the slightest interest, please do yourselves a favor and dive into his translations of these astounding works of literature. And then...hit the trifecta and do The Aeneid!

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