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Why would the pastor of a large and successful church risk everything in a quest to find a richer, deeper, fuller Christianity? In Water To Wine Brian Zahnd tells his story of disenchantment with pop Christianity and his search for a more substantive faith. “I was halfway to ninety—midway through life—and I had reached a full-blown crisis. Call it garden variety mid-life c Why would the pastor of a large and successful church risk everything in a quest to find a richer, deeper, fuller Christianity? In Water To Wine Brian Zahnd tells his story of disenchantment with pop Christianity and his search for a more substantive faith. “I was halfway to ninety—midway through life—and I had reached a full-blown crisis. Call it garden variety mid-life crisis if you want, but it was something more. You might say it was a theological crisis, though that makes it sound too cerebral. The unease I felt came from a deeper place than a mental file labeled “theology.” I was wrestling with the uneasy feeling that the faith I had built my life around was somehow deficient. Not wrong, but lacking. It seemed watery, weak. In my most honest moments I couldn’t help but notice that the faith I knew seemed to lack the kind of robust authenticity that made Jesus so fascinating. And I had always been utterly fascinated by Jesus. What I knew was that the Jesus I believed in warranted a better Christianity than what I was familiar with. I was in Cana and the wine had run out. I needed Jesus to perform a miracle.” –Water To Wine


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Why would the pastor of a large and successful church risk everything in a quest to find a richer, deeper, fuller Christianity? In Water To Wine Brian Zahnd tells his story of disenchantment with pop Christianity and his search for a more substantive faith. “I was halfway to ninety—midway through life—and I had reached a full-blown crisis. Call it garden variety mid-life c Why would the pastor of a large and successful church risk everything in a quest to find a richer, deeper, fuller Christianity? In Water To Wine Brian Zahnd tells his story of disenchantment with pop Christianity and his search for a more substantive faith. “I was halfway to ninety—midway through life—and I had reached a full-blown crisis. Call it garden variety mid-life crisis if you want, but it was something more. You might say it was a theological crisis, though that makes it sound too cerebral. The unease I felt came from a deeper place than a mental file labeled “theology.” I was wrestling with the uneasy feeling that the faith I had built my life around was somehow deficient. Not wrong, but lacking. It seemed watery, weak. In my most honest moments I couldn’t help but notice that the faith I knew seemed to lack the kind of robust authenticity that made Jesus so fascinating. And I had always been utterly fascinated by Jesus. What I knew was that the Jesus I believed in warranted a better Christianity than what I was familiar with. I was in Cana and the wine had run out. I needed Jesus to perform a miracle.” –Water To Wine

30 review for Water To Wine: Some of My Story

  1. 4 out of 5

    David

    Zahnd's book A Farewell to Mars on Christian nonviolence was a great read, both well-written and challenging. This offering by Zahnd is more of a memoir, as he speaks of how his life and faith deeply changed in 2004. At this time he began to see shallowness in the charismatic/evangelical Christian world he had always been a part of. Zahnd began to encounter the depth and beauty of the Christian tradition, reading everything from the Church Fathers to medieval mystics to contemporary authors who Zahnd's book A Farewell to Mars on Christian nonviolence was a great read, both well-written and challenging. This offering by Zahnd is more of a memoir, as he speaks of how his life and faith deeply changed in 2004. At this time he began to see shallowness in the charismatic/evangelical Christian world he had always been a part of. Zahnd began to encounter the depth and beauty of the Christian tradition, reading everything from the Church Fathers to medieval mystics to contemporary authors who had never come across his desk before. Through all of this, his faith went from weak water to beautiful wine. It was not easy though, as he faced challenges from his church as their pastor changed dramatically. I resonated with so much of what Zahnd wrote, though any shifts or changes I have had were not nearly so dramatic. Many of the authors, living and dead, he refers to are ones I have read and been challenged by. At the same time, Zahnd's story at times comes across a bit strange for someone not steeped in the world of charismatic Christianity. He writes of vivid dreams he has had and how they moved him. I can't remember my dreams the next day and his three are burned in his memory. He has also traveled a lot, before and after 2004, which influences him and makes me jealous! Overall though, this is a great book. Any Christian who is wondering if faith is shallow and too intertwined with consumerism or politics would benefit from this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    For this book to be a life-changer, I'd have to swallow a few too many statements that the author wants me to accept out of hand. However, that does not mean this book was completely without merit. I wholeheartedly agree with the author's belief that the Church in America has bought into a consumerized version of Christianity and that it needs to return to strong theological roots. I found that chapter 4, in particular, resonated with me. The principles I gleaned from it alone are worth the pric For this book to be a life-changer, I'd have to swallow a few too many statements that the author wants me to accept out of hand. However, that does not mean this book was completely without merit. I wholeheartedly agree with the author's belief that the Church in America has bought into a consumerized version of Christianity and that it needs to return to strong theological roots. I found that chapter 4, in particular, resonated with me. The principles I gleaned from it alone are worth the price of the book. After the 4th chapter, I had a lot harder time with the book. It was rambling and sometimes came off as smug. Some of the applications he made from Scripture seemed to be a reach. I'd have to do some more study to be convinced. For its descriptive telling of one man's spiritual awakening, I can appreciate this book. I learned (or was reminded of) a few timely things. But for the ways Zahnd seemed to want the out-working of his journey to be prescriptive for the rest of us, I have a harder time buying in.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Shurance

    I appreciate many of this book's points and resonate a lot with the spirituality of Zahnd. His critique of U.S. evangelicalism is warranted and his signposts for renewal are helpful. Still, the book is not particularly strong for the following reasons: -unnecessary poetry, usually of not great quality -very personalistic in its approach (most chapters are structured around his dreams/insights/experiences) -he name drops a bit much (all guys whom I respect, but still felt cumbersome) Reading the book I appreciate many of this book's points and resonate a lot with the spirituality of Zahnd. His critique of U.S. evangelicalism is warranted and his signposts for renewal are helpful. Still, the book is not particularly strong for the following reasons: -unnecessary poetry, usually of not great quality -very personalistic in its approach (most chapters are structured around his dreams/insights/experiences) -he name drops a bit much (all guys whom I respect, but still felt cumbersome) Reading the book in the two-thirds world, I couldn't help but marvel at his travel budget, which seemingly includes regular excursions in the Rockies and frequent trips to Europe and the Middle East. How easily is the vintage, majestic faith he speaks of accessible to the majority of evangelicals living around the world? (Granted, the book's audience is U.S. evangelicals.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ansley Gerhard-Roberts

    I’ve always enjoyed Brian Zahnd’s commentary from Twitter but this was the first book of his that I finished. It was excellent. At 45, he realizes that the Christianity he had dedicated his life to as a pastor, is deeply lacking. He was caught in the Evangelical charismatic Christianity movement, peddling what he now calls cotton candy theology. Finding himself deeply unsatisfied, he starts to dig in into the writing of the early Church Fathers and Mothers, particularly the mystics. Through this I’ve always enjoyed Brian Zahnd’s commentary from Twitter but this was the first book of his that I finished. It was excellent. At 45, he realizes that the Christianity he had dedicated his life to as a pastor, is deeply lacking. He was caught in the Evangelical charismatic Christianity movement, peddling what he now calls cotton candy theology. Finding himself deeply unsatisfied, he starts to dig in into the writing of the early Church Fathers and Mothers, particularly the mystics. Through this journey he discovers a much richer Christianity that is nothing like the tribalistic us against them self help pop theology that is so prevalent in American Christianity. He discovers the liturgy and the practice of contemplative prayer. Water to Wine is a memoir but it’s also a call to move beyond elementary theology to a richer and robust understanding of the Divine.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tristan Sherwin

    For those of us who feel restless with our faith, for those of us who feel that modern Christianity can often be too shallow, fundamentalist and obsessed with material progress, then this book is for you. *Water To Wine* traces Brian Zahnd's personal journey from drinking and dispensing 'grape juice' Christianity, to being awakened and intoxicated by the vintage wine of the Christian faith. Brian's words are a prophetic challenge and call to certain segments of the western church to let go of it' For those of us who feel restless with our faith, for those of us who feel that modern Christianity can often be too shallow, fundamentalist and obsessed with material progress, then this book is for you. *Water To Wine* traces Brian Zahnd's personal journey from drinking and dispensing 'grape juice' Christianity, to being awakened and intoxicated by the vintage wine of the Christian faith. Brian's words are a prophetic challenge and call to certain segments of the western church to let go of it's immaturity, consumerism and marriage to modern civil religion, and to once more rediscover and journey on the ancient pilgrim trail formed by those who traveled in the centuries before us. This is a summons to be re-acquainted with our rich heritage; to follow the road-markings of sacrament, creed and prayer; to seek a discipleship which is historically communal and cross-culturally diverse. This is an invitation to lose ourselves in the way of Jesus. Zahnd's previous works (*Beauty Will Save the World* and *A Farewell To Mars*) have all been encouraging and inspirational, giving a resonance to my own wandering over the last seven years. And *Water To Wine* follows suit in a beautiful and humble way. This is great piece of spiritual writing. A road-map to authentic religious experience. And a book all Christians should read. ---Tristan Sherwin, author of *Love: Expressed*

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Lewton

    I read this because I’m attending an upcoming event with Zahnd as a main speaker. This read more like an unedited journal than a work of literature. I did a lot of skimming through the long long paragraphs. I might not be the right audience for him, but someone else would be. Someone else slugging off the heavy coat of fundamentalism would probably find this book enlightening and freeing. This book is a good contribution to people finding their way in particular journeys of faith.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jodi Koepke

    Thought-provoking This book was recommended to me and I am grateful. It put into words some of the journey I have felt myself on. My soul resonated with much of it. Other parts have challenged me to think and process slowly with God.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Blake Wiggins

    4.5/5 stars As with all of Brian Zahnd's books, this is profound, beautiful, and challenging. I found so much of it to be a refreshing perspective from someone who has traveled many of the differing Christian roads and landed somewhere in between them all. The poetry throughout was breathtaking. 4.5/5 stars As with all of Brian Zahnd's books, this is profound, beautiful, and challenging. I found so much of it to be a refreshing perspective from someone who has traveled many of the differing Christian roads and landed somewhere in between them all. The poetry throughout was breathtaking.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Roland

    "I once heard an Italian winemaker say that to produce good wine the grapes must struggle, they must suffer. The taste of good wine is the taste of struggle and suffering mellowed into beauty. There’s a deep truth there that applies to far more than winemaking—it also applies to the formation of the soul." In Water to Wine, Pastor Brian Zahnd shares the story of his struggle into a deeper, more meaningful faith...a faith transformed into a fine, aged wine. Too often, Americanized Christianity fo "I once heard an Italian winemaker say that to produce good wine the grapes must struggle, they must suffer. The taste of good wine is the taste of struggle and suffering mellowed into beauty. There’s a deep truth there that applies to far more than winemaking—it also applies to the formation of the soul." In Water to Wine, Pastor Brian Zahnd shares the story of his struggle into a deeper, more meaningful faith...a faith transformed into a fine, aged wine. Too often, Americanized Christianity forgets our beautiful history and tradition. We've allowed consumerism, political tribalism, and misguided leadership to eat up our corporate faith from within. As a practitioner of the type of Bible bludgeoning common in Americanized Christianity, Brian Zahnd once facilitated the kind of faith that divides instead of unites, beats the drums of war instead of sounds the trumpets of peace, and rejects the foreigner instead of loving the neighbor. All of that changed in 2004, when Pastor Zahnd encountered a deeper sense of his faith through a series of dreams. These dreams led him into a richer understanding of prayer. Once he understood that he had been praying in an elementary way, his journey takes off into a deeper dive into the rich tradition of the Christian faith. No longer would he solely rely on the God of the Bible that solely requires empirical verifiability because God is much bigger than our need for certainty. He would journey to find a faith much richer, fuller, and loving. *SIDENOTE* If your looking for a way to engage deeper with God, do yourself a favor and go to one of Brian Zahnd's prayer schools, you won't regret it. Ok, back to the review.* A quote by Frederick Beuchner he used in the book hit me deep in my soul: "Without somehow destroying me in the process, how could God reveal himself in a way that would leave no room for doubt? If there were no room for doubt, there would be no room for me." Wow. Perhaps you feel like I do on your deconstruction journey. Perhaps you do feel destroyed at times, constantly battling the voices inside that tell you your on the wrong path. The voices that either tell you God isn't real, or if He is, that He surely wouldn't love everyone. Surely, He would exclude some people from heaven (never me of course). If that's you, if your on a path of deconstructing your faith, read this book. While it was difficult for me to identify with his charismatic flare at times (ie: receiving revelation on prayer thru dreams, or receiving words that would lead him out of consumerist Christianity into a more liturgical faith), I fully identify with his struggle to make sense of the world from a hyper evangelical, ultra conservative, us versus them type of faith. It's difficult confronting the beliefs you've held close to your heart with new lenses. At times, it hurts allowing yourself to grow past the rudimentary levels of faith into deeper, more mature knowledge. Sometimes, you have to decide if your deeper understanding of your faith matters more to you than societal acceptance, friendships, and even familial relationships. Ultimately, those seeking consolation that you aren't alone in this journey should read Pastor Zahnd's book realizing that the struggle (while it may hurt) will lead you from a small grape juice like faith into thar beautiful, full bodied wine faith that Christ intended for us all.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeroen Koornstra

    Brian Zahnd has written better books, like 'Unconditional?' I like his boldness to go against the flow and how he takes a stand against the typical American way of life and Amercanized gospel. He has a point, something has to change. He is a poet and a master in giving words to his thoughts. Ofcourse this book is his journey, so it is as it is. But I wonder where Zahnd will be in ten years from now. I doubt if the answer is in the mystical approach he now holds. Paul was not mystical, instead he Brian Zahnd has written better books, like 'Unconditional?' I like his boldness to go against the flow and how he takes a stand against the typical American way of life and Amercanized gospel. He has a point, something has to change. He is a poet and a master in giving words to his thoughts. Ofcourse this book is his journey, so it is as it is. But I wonder where Zahnd will be in ten years from now. I doubt if the answer is in the mystical approach he now holds. Paul was not mystical, instead he revealed which was a mystery for the prophets. Charismatic aspects were part of his life and teachings. I respect Zahnd and have been blessed by sermons and books, but the road he is now walking is not mine.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rick Lee Lee James

    I started reading this book and could not stop. It took me about three hours to finish. Brian Zahnd has written another great book and this one is especially meaningful because he tells his story of being born again again. I think that everyone will benefit from reading this, but especially pastors who have become tired of consumer pop Christianity. For those of you who need a transformation and who need a change from easy cheesy cotton candy Christianity this book is for you. The ancient Faith I started reading this book and could not stop. It took me about three hours to finish. Brian Zahnd has written another great book and this one is especially meaningful because he tells his story of being born again again. I think that everyone will benefit from reading this, but especially pastors who have become tired of consumer pop Christianity. For those of you who need a transformation and who need a change from easy cheesy cotton candy Christianity this book is for you. The ancient Faith is the way forward and Brian has been such a faithful witness to this movement of the spirit within the church and in his life and witness.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Levi Jones

    Water to Wine is the narration of Brian Zahnd's journey from a watered down Gospel to a deeper walk with Jesus. I resonated with the book because it mirrored so much of my own journey from fundamentalism to a sacramental understanding of life and ministry. The book was a quick read but it was full of depth as well. Zahnd points out the myriad ways that American Christianity has been co-opted by the culture and twisted it to something that it was never intended to be. He then calls Christians to Water to Wine is the narration of Brian Zahnd's journey from a watered down Gospel to a deeper walk with Jesus. I resonated with the book because it mirrored so much of my own journey from fundamentalism to a sacramental understanding of life and ministry. The book was a quick read but it was full of depth as well. Zahnd points out the myriad ways that American Christianity has been co-opted by the culture and twisted it to something that it was never intended to be. He then calls Christians to retrace the steps of historic Christianity and to discover again the rich wine of Jesus.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Water to Wine is the story of a successful mega-church pastor in middle America coming to know Christ in the way of a peace-loving, Kingdom of God seeking, contemplative Christian. And what a wonderful story it is! Who would have thought that the further and ongoing spiritual formation of a dynamic young Christian minister could yield even more fruit in ministry and more joy in serving God. It's true and it could happen to you! Water to Wine is the story of a successful mega-church pastor in middle America coming to know Christ in the way of a peace-loving, Kingdom of God seeking, contemplative Christian. And what a wonderful story it is! Who would have thought that the further and ongoing spiritual formation of a dynamic young Christian minister could yield even more fruit in ministry and more joy in serving God. It's true and it could happen to you!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stephen London

    This is a marvelous book. So beautiful. I love his vision of what it means to be a follower of Jesus. I will probably just read it again right away.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    I really liked this one! Easy to read and resonated with me. I'll have to write a fuller review later when I'm not on vacation. I really liked this one! Easy to read and resonated with me. I'll have to write a fuller review later when I'm not on vacation.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Glen Grunau

    This is a remarkable book. It is about one pastor who went through a revolutionary, cataclysmic paradigm shifting midlife experience that changed his entire trajectory from a loyal die-hard Pentecostal,  prosperity gospel preaching, Christian “Right” minister, to  a student of the mystics, a true contemplative.  Perhaps just as miraculous as this complete transformation of heart and mind was the fact that he remains as lead pastor in the same church he started when he was 17 years old, despite th This is a remarkable book. It is about one pastor who went through a revolutionary, cataclysmic paradigm shifting midlife experience that changed his entire trajectory from a loyal die-hard Pentecostal,  prosperity gospel preaching, Christian “Right” minister, to  a student of the mystics, a true contemplative.  Perhaps just as miraculous as this complete transformation of heart and mind was the fact that he remains as lead pastor in the same church he started when he was 17 years old, despite the inevitable criticism and rejection of the many fundamentalist leaning members of his congregation.  He has also become our pastor in the sense that Karen and I now rely on him to feed us each Sunday morning on YouTube where his Sunday morning teaching is posted within minutes of its completion in the eastern time zone.  What makes this book especially dear to me is how much I share in common with Brian when I compare some of the instrumental forces and directions in my own awakening. Besides being exactly the same age, we can both testify to the instrumental role that Dallas Willard’s book The Divine Conspiracy served in our awakening. As he listed many of the mystical guides that led him through his transformation, many of these have also guided me:  the likes of Soren Kierkegaard, George McDonald, Simone Weil, Thomas Merton, Rene Girard, Frederick Buechner, Wendell Berry, Walter Brueggeman, Richard Rohr, N. T. Wright . . .  Brian also marks musicians among his guides. He has a summer tradition of preaching a sermon series on meaningful songs that have shaped him.  We watched this series this summer. He called it “Finding God on Your Turntable”.  At the conclusion of his book he includes his “Water to Wine” playlist, which includes songs by Bob Dylan, John Lennon, U2, and Pink Floyd, among others. I was pleased to see that he included on his playlist two songs from my favourite musician, who I include among the mystical guides on my journey - Bruce Cockburn. I have been thrilled to discover in Brian‘s teaching and in this book so many of the distinctive beliefs that now characterize my own theology and view of Christ and his kingdom, but beliefs that sadly would be treated with suspicion, if not outright rejected, in the conservative evangelical church we attended for the past 25 years. If I were to identify one primary shift in my theology and worldview that marks my own paradigm shift, it would be my altered understanding of what Jesus represented in both love and judgment.   It would appear that Brian would likely say the same thing.  He says: "Could I have spoken so boldly about the supremacy of love prior to 2004? I don’t think so. I hadn’t yet met the mystics. I hadn’t yet learned how to read the Bible contemplatively. I had too much invested in proving that my tribe had all the right answers. I would have to go on a journey before I could arrive at the place where I really understood that the greatest of all is love. But by August 2004 I was beginning that journey. That was the month Dallas Willard showed me the divine conspiracy. That was the month I packed my bags and left consumer Christianity behind . . .  The sad lesson I learned is that within Christian cultures that have confused faith with certitude, it’s almost impossible for leaders to make any significant change, which means there is little or no freedom to really grow". 

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    The excellent memoir (and then some) of a fundamentalist charismatic evangelical American pastor who discovered a deeper Christian faith grounded in the depth and breadth of a tradition of thought and practice that spreads out left and right in our current era, and backwards through history to the foundations of Christianity - the full wealth of orthodoxy. I had already heard most of the first third of the book via listening to conference talks given by Zahnd, and I'm pretty familiar with him, s The excellent memoir (and then some) of a fundamentalist charismatic evangelical American pastor who discovered a deeper Christian faith grounded in the depth and breadth of a tradition of thought and practice that spreads out left and right in our current era, and backwards through history to the foundations of Christianity - the full wealth of orthodoxy. I had already heard most of the first third of the book via listening to conference talks given by Zahnd, and I'm pretty familiar with him, so I knew that the book was going to be good, but it is very good. Storytelling and teaching interweave beautifully, with a few too many references to Bob Dylan - but I'll forgive him that. And now for a provocative quote: "I want you to find the beautiful faith that lies beyond the cruel confines of fundamentalist fears and political agendas. I want you to find the generous orthodoxy that transcends tribalism. I want you to find the sacred mystery that is far deeper than shallow certitude. I want to say, 'Come with me, come to Cana, come to where Jesus turns water into wine.'"

  18. 4 out of 5

    Evan

    "The Orthodox give us the Christ of Glory. The Orthodox have their beautiful icons and a high Christology. The Catholics give us the Suffering Christ, which is why the crucifix is so prominent in Catholicism. The Anglicans give us Christ the Teacher—so many of our best theologians either come from the Anglicans or eventually find their home there. Protestants give us the Reforming Christ, the Jesus who challenges the Pharisees and cleanses the Temple. Evangelicals give us the Personal Jesus, the "The Orthodox give us the Christ of Glory. The Orthodox have their beautiful icons and a high Christology. The Catholics give us the Suffering Christ, which is why the crucifix is so prominent in Catholicism. The Anglicans give us Christ the Teacher—so many of our best theologians either come from the Anglicans or eventually find their home there. Protestants give us the Reforming Christ, the Jesus who challenges the Pharisees and cleanses the Temple. Evangelicals give us the Personal Jesus, the Jesus who calls his disciples by name and talks to Nicodemus about being born again. Pentecostals give us the miracle-working Jesus, who heals the sick and casts out demons." (Zahnd) The content here is deep and engaging. So much of what Zahnd writes about his journey resonates with me and my own journey. No fifth star from me because of my own stylistic bias. A book deals with deep contemplative faith shouldn't be written in the same style of prose as the "trite little tomes of pop Christianity" it seeks to distance itself from. :)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ronald

    Changed Me — If you take your Christian faith seriously but find yourself desiring more fulfillment, this book shows you a path. It is a path the author walked when halfway through his life. He found the tepid “water” that he was preaching every Sunday needed to be transformed into potent “wine”, just as Jesus did so many years ago in Cana. But this transformation was not an easy path. It is a path I pray to follow as well. This book is intriguing and, in places, deep. But I suspect it will chang Changed Me — If you take your Christian faith seriously but find yourself desiring more fulfillment, this book shows you a path. It is a path the author walked when halfway through his life. He found the tepid “water” that he was preaching every Sunday needed to be transformed into potent “wine”, just as Jesus did so many years ago in Cana. But this transformation was not an easy path. It is a path I pray to follow as well. This book is intriguing and, in places, deep. But I suspect it will change your perception of true Christian faith as it did mine.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lori Neff

    It took me a little while to get into this book, then I'd be unable to put it down... then stall out again. I was taken by several parts that made the entire book worthwhile for me. I also ordered a few books based on how often he quoted them... and I see that I need to listen to Bob Dylan more. :) It gave me a renewed vision for contemplation, the Eucharist, and intentionality. I'd recommend this book for the final chapter alone - it was wonderful. It took me a little while to get into this book, then I'd be unable to put it down... then stall out again. I was taken by several parts that made the entire book worthwhile for me. I also ordered a few books based on how often he quoted them... and I see that I need to listen to Bob Dylan more. :) It gave me a renewed vision for contemplation, the Eucharist, and intentionality. I'd recommend this book for the final chapter alone - it was wonderful.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robert Grisham

    This was another one of those right time, right place kinds of books. I was on amazon looking at something, and this book was on the "you might like this book also" line. I clicked on it and saw that it was available on kindle unlimited, and since I had that for another 6 weeks I picked it up. I read it in a few days. It was so timely. I especially enjoyed his chapter on fixed hour prayer, and I've been practicing his prayer liturgy most days during the last few weeks. This was another one of those right time, right place kinds of books. I was on amazon looking at something, and this book was on the "you might like this book also" line. I clicked on it and saw that it was available on kindle unlimited, and since I had that for another 6 weeks I picked it up. I read it in a few days. It was so timely. I especially enjoyed his chapter on fixed hour prayer, and I've been practicing his prayer liturgy most days during the last few weeks.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brett Leyde

    Brian Zahnd is a very impactful author for me. His book Sinners in the Hands of a Loving God is one of my all time favorites. This book articulates the why/how behind is departure from fundamentalism to seeking the true mystery of Christ. A lot of emphasis falls on how fundamentalists have left the body of Christ behind (non-evangelicals, catholics , desert fathers & mothers, etc) and there is much to be gained from that part of the family of God. I loved it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Pannell

    Simply 'WOW!" I have read a huge number of books but this I think is the one I will return to many times. I have copied pages into my note books to easily refer to again. Brian Zahnd invites the reader to "Come with me", and I know I've started a different walk to follow Jesus than I was on before reading this book. Simply 'WOW!" I have read a huge number of books but this I think is the one I will return to many times. I have copied pages into my note books to easily refer to again. Brian Zahnd invites the reader to "Come with me", and I know I've started a different walk to follow Jesus than I was on before reading this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Henrik

    Started out great - increasingly difficult Starting out I liked the book a lot but a few chapters in, I found it more and more difficult to read. Zahnd writes about his black and white view (theology) in the evangelical era prior to his journey in 2004. Unfortunately I feel that the black and white mindset still is there in some of the statements that are made in the book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Liz Cates

    There are so many great points in this book that is really more of a memoir of Zahnd's personal journey. The problem is that there's an equal amount of perspective that felt more opinionated than biblically grounded. Altogether, this is a thought provoking book and worth the time & effort. There are so many great points in this book that is really more of a memoir of Zahnd's personal journey. The problem is that there's an equal amount of perspective that felt more opinionated than biblically grounded. Altogether, this is a thought provoking book and worth the time & effort.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    An eye and heart opening read! An excellent book filled with great insight and guidance. It truly challenges you to consider who God truly is and what he is calling us to do and be. Highly recommended!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Thought provoking It took great courage to step out of the successful pastoral path Brian was on. He has given me much to consider on my faith journey. I like his inclusive view of humanity, and his characterization of the American consumerism Christianity.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Keith Sherwood

    Awesome work for those Deconstructing I love the honesty and the willingness to be vulnerable. It is a hard thing to say we have gotten it wrong. It is even harder to change and walk the path you are shown. Brian left a profound impact on me with this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    So, so good. Zahnd discussed so many of the issues that I’ve been having lately with modern, American Christianity. This is definitely a book that I’ll need to read more than once—there’s too much insight in here to get it all on the first read-through.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eva Winter

    I really identified with it Like Brian, I had been a Christian for many years, being certain of my faith and beliefs. Like him, I discovered that the journey had just begun. There is a much richer, deeper faith in Christ to be had if we are just willing to go on a similar journey.

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