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Herbert West, an ambitious young medical student at Miskatonic University, and his colleague embark down a path filled with dubious science and horrifying results as they endeavor to bring life back to dead bodies that they harvest from the margins of society. Their unholy quest leads them across New England and eventually into the trenches of the Great War as West's scien Herbert West, an ambitious young medical student at Miskatonic University, and his colleague embark down a path filled with dubious science and horrifying results as they endeavor to bring life back to dead bodies that they harvest from the margins of society. Their unholy quest leads them across New England and eventually into the trenches of the Great War as West's scientific obsession degenerates into a hellish and perverse addiction to the abnormal. Herbert West -- Reanimator is perhaps one of Lovecraft's most famous stories, thanks to Stuart Gordon's 1985 cult classic film version: Re-Animator. And some might say that's regrettable, because Lovecraft himself intended it as a parody and didn't think it was a very good piece of writing. Although it's certainly not his best, it remains one of his most popular tales. It's the pulpiest of his fiction, full of gore, action, and even one-liners. HWR also shows Lovecraft at his most blatantly racist, and although we don't agree with or endorse any of the bigoted sentiments in the original story, rather than try to edit all that out, when adapting the story for radio we decided to acknowlege that it's there and turn it into a running joke. All of the characters in this show utter some very politically incorrect remarks. There's musical wit as well, and history, with the original score by Reber Clark featuring sly references to a few popular tunes of the early 20th century. And the show features an exciting original fight song for Miskatonic University, the beloved institution Lovecraft invented in this story. To celebrate that achievement, the CD features a special bonus track with an alternate version of the M.U. fight song. Onward Miskatonic! On to victory!


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Herbert West, an ambitious young medical student at Miskatonic University, and his colleague embark down a path filled with dubious science and horrifying results as they endeavor to bring life back to dead bodies that they harvest from the margins of society. Their unholy quest leads them across New England and eventually into the trenches of the Great War as West's scien Herbert West, an ambitious young medical student at Miskatonic University, and his colleague embark down a path filled with dubious science and horrifying results as they endeavor to bring life back to dead bodies that they harvest from the margins of society. Their unholy quest leads them across New England and eventually into the trenches of the Great War as West's scientific obsession degenerates into a hellish and perverse addiction to the abnormal. Herbert West -- Reanimator is perhaps one of Lovecraft's most famous stories, thanks to Stuart Gordon's 1985 cult classic film version: Re-Animator. And some might say that's regrettable, because Lovecraft himself intended it as a parody and didn't think it was a very good piece of writing. Although it's certainly not his best, it remains one of his most popular tales. It's the pulpiest of his fiction, full of gore, action, and even one-liners. HWR also shows Lovecraft at his most blatantly racist, and although we don't agree with or endorse any of the bigoted sentiments in the original story, rather than try to edit all that out, when adapting the story for radio we decided to acknowlege that it's there and turn it into a running joke. All of the characters in this show utter some very politically incorrect remarks. There's musical wit as well, and history, with the original score by Reber Clark featuring sly references to a few popular tunes of the early 20th century. And the show features an exciting original fight song for Miskatonic University, the beloved institution Lovecraft invented in this story. To celebrate that achievement, the CD features a special bonus track with an alternate version of the M.U. fight song. Onward Miskatonic! On to victory!

30 review for Dark Adventure Radio Theatre: Herbert West - Reanimator (Audio Drama)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bill Kerwin

    H.P. Lovecraft stories don't usually make me think of Mel Brooks and Bruce Campbell, but "Herbert West" is definitely an exception. This story, like H.P.’s subsequent work “The Lurking Fear,” was written to-order as a serial publication for the humor magazine Home Brew. Although Lovecraft’s interest in atmospheric effects often mars “The Lurking Fear”’s humorous tone, “Herbert West” is unharmed by any serious horror. On the contrary, H.P. embraces this over-the-top tale of “re-animation”—a conger H.P. Lovecraft stories don't usually make me think of Mel Brooks and Bruce Campbell, but "Herbert West" is definitely an exception. This story, like H.P.’s subsequent work “The Lurking Fear,” was written to-order as a serial publication for the humor magazine Home Brew. Although Lovecraft’s interest in atmospheric effects often mars “The Lurking Fear”’s humorous tone, “Herbert West” is unharmed by any serious horror. On the contrary, H.P. embraces this over-the-top tale of “re-animation”—a congeries of cliches filched from Frankenstein, “The Body Snatcher” and more debased sources—and makes of it a mocking parody of gothic horror, the only thoroughly successful work of death’s head humor Lovecraft ever achieved. Herbert West, the grave blue-eyed, blond-haired medical student and his narrator sidekick, raid the nearby graveyards and hospitals looking for fresh corpses to stir into life. Although they may produce a series of twitches, a leap or a howl—and even the occasional word here and there—their experiments are ludicrous failures. Still, these failures are more successful than they think, and literally come back to haunt them. Lovecraft clearly enjoyed writing this farce, and I think you will enjoy reading it too, appreciating how he transforms his great weakness as a writer—a penchant for overwrought prose—into a positive strength. I particularly like how he deals with one of the challenges of serial publication—the recap at the beginning of each episode—and turns it to his advantage, creating a somewhat different recap every time, each entertaining in its own way. Unfortunately, “Herbert West” also has more than a touch of Lovecraft’s customary zenophobia and racism (brutish negroes, superstition Italians, etc.) but here these odious tendencies are partially redeemed by irony: the most degenerate, decadent example of humanity displayed here is the blond-haired, blue-eyed Herbert West himself: Gradually I came to find Herbert West himself more horrible than anything he did—that was when it dawned on me that his once normal scientific zeal for prolonging life had subtly degenerated into a mere morbid and ghoulish curiosity and secret sense of charnel picturesqueness. His interest became a hellish and perverse addiction to the repellently and fiendishly abnormal; he gloated calmly over artificial monstrosities which would make most healthy men drop dead from fright and disgust; he became, behind his pallid intellectuality, a fastidious Baudelaire of physical experiment—a languid Elagabalus of the tombs.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    One of the best H.P. Lovecraft's stories! Herbert West believes that human body is not other than an “organic machine” and therefore, there has to be a way of “re-starting” it when it passed away. Since he was a medical student at Miskatonic University, he allied with the story’s narrator, another fellow medical student, to make secret experiments to make possible the reanimation of a dead person, and those experiments continued once both get their medical degrees and began their private medi One of the best H.P. Lovecraft's stories! Herbert West believes that human body is not other than an “organic machine” and therefore, there has to be a way of “re-starting” it when it passed away. Since he was a medical student at Miskatonic University, he allied with the story’s narrator, another fellow medical student, to make secret experiments to make possible the reanimation of a dead person, and those experiments continued once both get their medical degrees and began their private medical practice, and even during their military medical service on World War I. During all those years, having different morbid results on their sinister experiments. It’s curious to know that H.P. Lovecraft only accepted to write this story for the money and he disliked to be forced to make “cliffhangers” at the end of each chapter, when it was originally published in a magazine, and moreover to be considered by many Lovecraft’s scholars as his weakest work. I say that it’s curious since I truly loved the story! Easily my second favorite H.P. Lovecraft’s story, right after The Dunwich Horror. I think that it was productive taking Lovecraft out of his “comfort zone” having him to write cliffhangers, and plotting more action scenes than in the rest of his usual work. Even he introduced the iconic Miskatonic University in this very tale. I believe that it allows him (not matter if he wanted or not) to greatly plot a very dark, way grim and quite morbid tale, easy to understand, easy to follow, easy to enjoy, without any metaphysical ambiguous elements. Simple. To the point. Truly scary. And without having the reader needing to look for any “secret clue” to link with the Cthulhu Mythos. Yes, Cthulhu is cool but, here, Lovecraft proved that he could developed a totally human villain, with totally human wickedness, that he was evil of his own without having being contaminated by some paranormal and/or alien external source. Good ol’ evil human nature. And still, the story presents clear Lovecraftian elements such as the preference of employing drugs in the plot instead of other means like electricity (as used on Frankenstein) to reanimate corpses, that certainly has to be one of the earliest prose stories (besides Frankenstein) in the exploit of the Zombies literary genre, so popular nowadays in the new millenium. Also, since the character of “Herbert West” is part of the story’s title, I think that he can be easily one of the most known characters of Lovecraft’s work, just behind of the character of “Cthulhu”, that it’s helped too due the loosely based film franchise of Re-Animator.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    First person narrator talks about his time with Dr Herbert West who reanimates dead people. Chapter by chapter he drives his experiments further. Starting with little animals and guinea-pigs he soon turns to human beings. The corpses have to be fresh. Dr West is also working at the front of WW 1. What happens to the reanimated corpses? Are they a threat to anyone? Why is Dr Herbert West missing at some point of the story and no one knows his whereabouts? Absolutely creepy and pageturning story. First person narrator talks about his time with Dr Herbert West who reanimates dead people. Chapter by chapter he drives his experiments further. Starting with little animals and guinea-pigs he soon turns to human beings. The corpses have to be fresh. Dr West is also working at the front of WW 1. What happens to the reanimated corpses? Are they a threat to anyone? Why is Dr Herbert West missing at some point of the story and no one knows his whereabouts? Absolutely creepy and pageturning story. A real Lovecraft classic. Absolutely nothing for the faint hearted here! Recommended!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Lovecraft's solid attempt at a Frankenstein story. Pretty ghastly descriptions. Good stuff! Lovecraft's solid attempt at a Frankenstein story. Pretty ghastly descriptions. Good stuff!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mir

    This was published as separate stories, I think not all in the same journal, with the result that each chapter is about 50% dull recapitulation of the set-up and previous events. The cheesiness was amusing, though -- and surprising. I had kind of assumed that was added into the movie, but no.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Althea Ann

    Although presented here as one story, this is actually a series of six linked stories about the mad scientist, Dr. Herbert West. More than anything else by Lovecraft, these feel like true pulp fiction, written for pure shocking entertainment, with a dashed-off, distinctly "non-literary" feel. Originally published as a serial, the magazine that they were written for apparently (and unfortunately) demanded that Lovecraft 're-cap' previous events in each installment, which makes for repetitive, ted Although presented here as one story, this is actually a series of six linked stories about the mad scientist, Dr. Herbert West. More than anything else by Lovecraft, these feel like true pulp fiction, written for pure shocking entertainment, with a dashed-off, distinctly "non-literary" feel. Originally published as a serial, the magazine that they were written for apparently (and unfortunately) demanded that Lovecraft 're-cap' previous events in each installment, which makes for repetitive, tedious reading when you're not waiting a month between segments. Once the re-cap bits are dealt with, though, the story itself is great fun. It can be viewed as a parody of or an homage to Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' - but where Dr. Frankenstein was an earnest experimenter, Dr. West is a straight-up psychopath. Each segment tries to outdo the one before with gross and disturbing gory details. [One 'alert' - the third segment clearly reflects what can be most generously interpreted as the narrator's racism, in a way that's a different sort of unpleasant.] I haven't seen the movie that was based on these stories. Someone told me, back when it was a recent release, that its cheesy schlockiness didn't do Lovecraft justice. But after reading the stories, I actually feel that a schlocky, campy adaptation is appropriate to the source material.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Apatt

    I am in the process of writing a review for The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories, apparently the most popular Lovecraft anthology. However, as I have just finished reading Herbert West–Reanimator which is a longish short story (AKA novelette) of about 30 pages I thought I would review this separately. This story is atypical of Lovecraft’s main body of work in several ways, not in tone but in structure and prose style. Lovecraft was commissioned to write a six parts serial for Weird Tales I am in the process of writing a review for The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories, apparently the most popular Lovecraft anthology. However, as I have just finished reading Herbert West–Reanimator which is a longish short story (AKA novelette) of about 30 pages I thought I would review this separately. This story is atypical of Lovecraft’s main body of work in several ways, not in tone but in structure and prose style. Lovecraft was commissioned to write a six parts serial for Weird Tales magazine, each part ending with a cliff hanger. HPL hated having to write outside his preferred framework but he had to this one for the money and consequently hated this story with a passion. So much for the quality of labour of love because this is one of his most popular works and it is one of my favorites of his stories. Another divergence from the typical HPL fare is that Herbert West–Reanimator has nothing to do with the Cthulhu mythos, no elder gods and the unmentionable (but frequently mentioned) Necronomicon by the mad Arab Abdul Alhazred here, certain parts of the story are set in the Miskatonic University in Arkham though. Herbert West–Reanimator is about the eponymous Dr. Herbert West who is obsessed with the idea of defeating death under his theory that life is thoroughly mechanical in nature, there is nothing else beyond it, no soul, no afterlife (but hopefully some form of rock ‘n roll). This being the case West likes to experiment on fresh corpses to try to bring them back to life with their minds intact. I don’t think it will much of a spoiler to say (view spoiler)[he never succeeds (hide spoiler)] . The more he experiments the more chaotic the results, much hilarity mind-shattering horror ensues. While I enjoy HPL’s work in general I am not a fan of his prose style. All too often he seems to strive too hard for eloquence and ends up with awfully convoluted almost unreadable sentences that often outstay their welcome. I tend to prefer his shorter works, whereas I struggle to get through his longer works like At the Mountains of Madness and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward. This is another unusual aspect of Herbert West–Reanimator, while it is longer than most of his stories, it is written with an economy of word usage I seldom see in his work, the prose here is straightforward, free from artifice and verbiage, he even calls a spade a spade! Consequently, this is one of his very best stories. As mentioned above, the subject matter has nothing to do with the Cthulhu mythos, no Mad Paula Abdul (or whatever his name is) and no Necronomicon, this makes for a nice change of pace. This story is pure sci-fi horror (as opposed to his usual cosmic horror), the “sci” part of it is handwavium nonsense but nobody is expecting him to do an Asimov. It will likely remind modern readers of zombie stories and Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein, without the subtlety. To quote the AV Club "H.P. Lovecraft wasn’t generally a barrel of laughs", but I did find this story unintentionally hilarious at times. I don't know if anybody will find it scary, but it is vastly entertaining, and I would heartily recommend it to newcomers to HPL and fans of the horror genre. Note: The cult classic 1985 movie adaptation deserves a mention, as with most adaptations it diverges freely from the source material, especially as it is (very) darkly hilarious, read more about this at the AV Club.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maliha Tabassum Tisha

    Originally serialized in Home Brew, an amateur humor magazine published by his friend, Lovecraft was required to end each episode on a cliffhanger and begin the next with a recap of the previous. He never merged/ edited the story afterwards, due to which the narrative is too frustrating to read. In addition, the dull humor did nothing but subdue whatever horror the story could possibly generate in the reader. Overall, a below average read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    The wonderful audio tale of Herbert West and his obsession with desecrating the dead to discover immortality. OVERALL GRADE: B plus.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ᴥ Irena ᴥ

    Herbert West: Reanimator is told by an unnamed narrator, who became friends with Herbert West while they were both studying medicine at Miskatonic University in Arkham. It consists of six chapters ('From the Dark', 'The Plague-Daemon', 'Six Shots by Midnight', 'The Scream of the Dead', 'The Horror From the Shadows', 'The Tomb-Legions') and repetitions of West's appearance and certain events clearly show that it was written in instalments. That and the chapter cliffhangers make this story a bit a Herbert West: Reanimator is told by an unnamed narrator, who became friends with Herbert West while they were both studying medicine at Miskatonic University in Arkham. It consists of six chapters ('From the Dark', 'The Plague-Daemon', 'Six Shots by Midnight', 'The Scream of the Dead', 'The Horror From the Shadows', 'The Tomb-Legions') and repetitions of West's appearance and certain events clearly show that it was written in instalments. That and the chapter cliffhangers make this story a bit annoying to read. Still, each chapter show the obsession that was the driving force of West's life and his following degradation. It is a morbid, even cautionary, story of an obsessed scientist's quest to beat the laws of nature, of death and life. From experimenting on animals to body-snatching to finally obtaining a truly fresh specimen, West was determined to reanimate the corpses he got. And the narrator was there from the beginning to the end. 'Briefly and brutally stated, West's sole absorbing interest was a secret study of the phenomena of life and its cessation, leading toward the reanimation of the dead through injections of an excitant solution.' While West is an obsessed lunatic, the narrator doesn’t even have that to justify his actions. He started being afraid of West much later. For years he helped him get whatever he needed for his experiments.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Four stars until the end, now five. I wonder if SK found partial inspiration for "Revival" from this short story. A scientist becomes obsessed with reanimating life. The beginning reminded me of the movie "Flatliners," which I loved. Lovecraft began the story in a medical college, and the two did experiments attempting to reanimate the dead. Herbert West, the narrator's comrade, increases in obsession over years, taking his obsession for dead bodies and parts for his experiments to joining the war Four stars until the end, now five. I wonder if SK found partial inspiration for "Revival" from this short story. A scientist becomes obsessed with reanimating life. The beginning reminded me of the movie "Flatliners," which I loved. Lovecraft began the story in a medical college, and the two did experiments attempting to reanimate the dead. Herbert West, the narrator's comrade, increases in obsession over years, taking his obsession for dead bodies and parts for his experiments to joining the war effort, with alternative motives. The story has a fantastic ending, in my opinion.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Juho Pohjalainen

    The serialization of this story does it a disservice. Lovecraft's forced to come up with artificial tension and highs and lows in between, and isn't allowed to take his time and build it up properly. He even ends up giving up an otherwise very nice final twist well in advance, trying to squeeze the same climax twice over, which simply doesn't work. But he could have pulled it off way worse, and the atmosphere is as gloomy as his work always is. The serialization of this story does it a disservice. Lovecraft's forced to come up with artificial tension and highs and lows in between, and isn't allowed to take his time and build it up properly. He even ends up giving up an otherwise very nice final twist well in advance, trying to squeeze the same climax twice over, which simply doesn't work. But he could have pulled it off way worse, and the atmosphere is as gloomy as his work always is.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Estelle

    One of the most accessible and straight-forward horror short stories by Lovecraft. A good place to start for those who want to try this author. Great audiobook narrator on Librivox. One thing tho, this story was originally serialised in some publication which is why each chapter/part includes some kind of recap and might feel repetitive if you read the whole thing in one sitting.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    WOW! Just wow! I haven't read many of Lovecraft's stories yet but this is my favorite so far! Here is an awesome audiobook of the story. Part 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgtkh... Part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EekqG... WOW! Just wow! I haven't read many of Lovecraft's stories yet but this is my favorite so far! Here is an awesome audiobook of the story. Part 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgtkh... Part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EekqG...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    Note: This story is part of The Complete Works of H.P. Lovecraft, made available in ebook format at CthulhuChick.com. Synopsis: The narrator tells the story, in multiple vignettes, of Herbert West's obsessive quest to reanimate the recently dead. My Thoughts: When I lived in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, my husband at the time and I developed an obsession with B-movies of all ilk, watching them for hours. Among those we particularly enjoyed were the "Reanimator" series of films, based upon this short s Note: This story is part of The Complete Works of H.P. Lovecraft, made available in ebook format at CthulhuChick.com. Synopsis: The narrator tells the story, in multiple vignettes, of Herbert West's obsessive quest to reanimate the recently dead. My Thoughts: When I lived in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, my husband at the time and I developed an obsession with B-movies of all ilk, watching them for hours. Among those we particularly enjoyed were the "Reanimator" series of films, based upon this short story. The story provides a low-level, steady progression of horror as the narrator watches Herbert West devolve into madness. Lovecraft writes using beautiful, lyrical language - linguists will find reading these stories riveting and enjoy the mental stimulation of the lovely words. If you enjoyed the movies, if you enjoy stories of the weird and esoteric, and if you enjoy highly creepy tales, then don't miss this wonderful short story.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    Has all the essential elements of a good Hammer Film Productions piece. It’s gritty and gross, cheesy yet fun and verbose. Feels like a skeletal frame of Frankenstein, just not nearly as long and emotionally complex. Frankenstein is the better book in my opinion, but I gotta give Lovecraft credit for whipping up something that’s pretty damn morbid.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jody Taylor

    Very funny, by classic Poe-type author. Concise and much easier to read than a lot of Lovecraft's works. Fans of the movie should check this out, as the plot differs quite a bit. My favorite phrase is "corpse of a doubtful vintage". Hilarious. Very funny, by classic Poe-type author. Concise and much easier to read than a lot of Lovecraft's works. Fans of the movie should check this out, as the plot differs quite a bit. My favorite phrase is "corpse of a doubtful vintage". Hilarious.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zebulynn Hanson

    I love Lovecraft vocabulary.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    This is my first HP Lovecraft. I have a slight fixation on Jeffrey Combs which inevitably led me to watching Stuart Gordon's Reanimator as well as some of Combs's other Lovecraft-based films, most of which didn't really convince me to read Lovecraft ("body horror"; required scene of a monster groping naked and screaming Barbara Crampton). I had been warned by a friend beforehand that the film is quite different from the short story. I can't say I approached this warning with much trepidation as This is my first HP Lovecraft. I have a slight fixation on Jeffrey Combs which inevitably led me to watching Stuart Gordon's Reanimator as well as some of Combs's other Lovecraft-based films, most of which didn't really convince me to read Lovecraft ("body horror"; required scene of a monster groping naked and screaming Barbara Crampton). I had been warned by a friend beforehand that the film is quite different from the short story. I can't say I approached this warning with much trepidation as though I enjoyed the campy gorefest of a film, I was not sure if I would have liked reading such a depiction. However, Jeffrey Combs read the story. OF COURSE I WOULD LIKE IT. He vocalizes dread, horror, and fear in such an effective way, in my humble opinion. Even without my bias, he did an excellent reading. I wish he was hired more for audiobook readings. DO IT, PEOPLE. I WILL GIVE YOU MY MONEY. Story-wise, I actually liked the story better than the film. It reminded me a lot of Gaston Laroux's Phantom of the Opera, in both feel and narrative style. Pulp gothic horror. I'll have to re-read this story again in text form without Mr. Combs clouding my judgement. Um, after I listen to the audiobook again. Which I will be doing... right now.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    I'll be completely honest and say that I don't know for sure if I allowed myself to fall victim to the age in which I was born; maybe I have come to expect and demand more detailed gore? Maybe it was because I'd mistakingly read Pete Rawlik's Reanimators before I read this one. Maybe I was colored by my personal dislike for the author and his description of people of color (and for his 'rectification' of said issue, I feel that Rawlik is owed kudos). I don't know. But I do know that I didn't I'll be completely honest and say that I don't know for sure if I allowed myself to fall victim to the age in which I was born; maybe I have come to expect and demand more detailed gore? Maybe it was because I'd mistakingly read Pete Rawlik's Reanimators before I read this one. Maybe I was colored by my personal dislike for the author and his description of people of color (and for his 'rectification' of said issue, I feel that Rawlik is owed kudos). I don't know. But I do know that I didn't much care for Herbert West: Reanimator. Lovecraft's novella tells the story of Herbert West, a doctor cum inventor who believes that 'death' is but a medical condition; one that should be possible to cure. After countless and horrendous experiements on bodies procured from grave robbers, Herbert West and his one and only friend, the narrator, Cain, decides that the only way forward is to turn to fresher specimens. I've never been a huge fan of Lovecraftiana; I do like the idea of the eldritch, of forgotten or hidden deities.... just not ones with tentacles... And I'm definitely not a fan of the opinions of the creator of Lovecraftiana. (That being said, I really did enjoy The Case of Charles Dexter Ward ; it had that special kind of dread that snuck up on you, that kept you constant company and while you knew that it would end badly, you couldn't quite foresee how.) While Herbert West: Reanimator didn't contain any tentacles, and did contain plenty of the risen dead, I can't say that it was one of my more enjoyable reads.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paul Ataua

    I remember chuckling my way through the movie back in 1985, and despite knowing it was ever so loosely based on the original story, I couldn’t resist reading this. Despite not being a Lovecraft fan, I found it surprisingly engaging. I soon got over the repetition (I later found out this came from joining several stories together), and found the ending quite chilling. More Lovecraft on the horizon? Maybe.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Linton

    Definitely one of Lovecraft's best in terms of tone and creativity. The only issue is the repetition of the narrator at the beginning of each section. This is due to the text originally being a serialization, though it is rather inconvenient for a modern reader. Definitely one of Lovecraft's best in terms of tone and creativity. The only issue is the repetition of the narrator at the beginning of each section. This is due to the text originally being a serialization, though it is rather inconvenient for a modern reader.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    Probably the best audiobook presentation I have ever listened to. Combs is amazing.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alex Bright

    ...corpses of doubtful vintage... I'd rather watch the movie in all it's b-rated glory. Lovecraft is hit and miss, especially when it comes to how much casual racism he injects into his stories. Sometimes there's little to nothing, but "Reanimator" is not one of those. I'm beginning to think he just hates people, period. There are some wonderfully morbid visuals and somewhat interesting ideas, yet none of it seems particularly unique -- Mary Shelley did it all before, and better. I prefer stories ...corpses of doubtful vintage... I'd rather watch the movie in all it's b-rated glory. Lovecraft is hit and miss, especially when it comes to how much casual racism he injects into his stories. Sometimes there's little to nothing, but "Reanimator" is not one of those. I'm beginning to think he just hates people, period. There are some wonderfully morbid visuals and somewhat interesting ideas, yet none of it seems particularly unique -- Mary Shelley did it all before, and better. I prefer stories in his cosmic horror mythos.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael Gardner

    Lovecraft does Frankenstein meets Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde meets Where'd I Leave My Zombie? meets Lovecraft. Honesty, Herbert West wasn't very good at keeping track of where he left his zombies. It's the kind of character flaw that comes back to bite you. Lovecraft does Frankenstein meets Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde meets Where'd I Leave My Zombie? meets Lovecraft. Honesty, Herbert West wasn't very good at keeping track of where he left his zombies. It's the kind of character flaw that comes back to bite you.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sundus

    Extremely disturbing !!!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth McKinley

    First off, I have to confess that I'm a huge fan of the 1985 Stuart Gordon-directed movie adaptation. So, I'm sure I was a little biased in that I was going to like the story. But this is where, as a reader and movie fan, you have to be careful. It's easy to be disappointed with any other version than the one you originally fell in love with. Most of the time, it's the movie adaptation from the book. But, since I fell in love with the movie first, I went into this story with guarded optimism. On First off, I have to confess that I'm a huge fan of the 1985 Stuart Gordon-directed movie adaptation. So, I'm sure I was a little biased in that I was going to like the story. But this is where, as a reader and movie fan, you have to be careful. It's easy to be disappointed with any other version than the one you originally fell in love with. Most of the time, it's the movie adaptation from the book. But, since I fell in love with the movie first, I went into this story with guarded optimism. One look will show that I gave it 5 out of 5 stars. Obviously, there was no let down going from cinema back to the original written page. If anything, it was better. The story is a parody of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Lovecraft was paid to write the story in installments and end each installment in a cliff hanger fashion. He was also required to begin each new installment with a recap of the previous installments. According to renowned Lovecraft historian, S.T. Joshi, Lovecraft was unhappy with the story and only wrote it because he was being paid five dollars for each installment. He also states that's Herbert West:Reanimator is "universally regarded as one of Lovecraft's poorest efforts". I couldn't disagree more. The story is edgy. Especially, when comparing it to the times. It was written between 1921 and 1922. Decapitations, grave robbing, disemboweling, and cannibalism? Not you're typical fare in literature from the Great Gatsby era. What I love most about this story and other ones written by Lovecraft, for that matter, is that you can see all the influences he had on the horror genre. The story is a recounting of a doctor who went to medical school with Herbert West and the two began experimenting on bringing the dead back to life through the use of West's research. What started with lab animals evolved into human cadavers. While the research shows promise, the results are problematic due to the lack of freshness of the corpse. This leads West on a quest for fresher specimens and ultimately down the road to the edge of madness. Herbert West:Reanimator is an easy and fun introduction to Lovecraft, especially if you're already familiar with the movie adaptation. The writing isn't as dry and tedious as some of his others and makes for a quick read. Its a great little story to see where many of the horror icons of today got their influences from. 5 out of 5 stars You can also follow my reviews at the following links: https://kenmckinley.wordpress.com https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/5... http://www.amazon.com/gp/profile/A2J1... TWITTER - @KenMcKinley5

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kaiva Koenig

    I read this short story by candle-light, in the dark, by the light of a fading lamp. :) The mood improves greatly when read in the right setting. This was a thrilling read, which was a pleasant surprise, because most (if not all) gothic fiction tends to bore me to death. This story actually chilled me to the bone and was an exciting scary read (perhaps the candles had something to do with it). Plot-wise, this is Frankenstein, but ten times shorter, without the moronic moral message, without the d I read this short story by candle-light, in the dark, by the light of a fading lamp. :) The mood improves greatly when read in the right setting. This was a thrilling read, which was a pleasant surprise, because most (if not all) gothic fiction tends to bore me to death. This story actually chilled me to the bone and was an exciting scary read (perhaps the candles had something to do with it). Plot-wise, this is Frankenstein, but ten times shorter, without the moronic moral message, without the depressing weepy prose, and with a likable narrator. Lovecraft did a fine job of creating tension in this story. The story is broken down in sections, and each section has a short recap of what happened in the previous section. Somehow this gave the story the feel of a Saturday morning cartoon a la Scooby-doo, and served to keep me very much engaged in the story. The recaps did not feel repetitive at all, but instead they worked to keep the suspense going. The narrator was someone you can relate to, and the Reanimator (the character) was a truly scary mysterious man whose many secrets to this day remain unknown. Unsettling in the right kind of way!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Godzilla

    This would have been a 5 star rating, but for a slightly irritating narrative technique that Lovecraft used. Each different chapter seems to recap the basic premise, in a similar fashion to some modern day tv programmes: "Before the break..." etc Now this may be due to the fact that it was initially serialised in some publication, a fact which has just occurred ot me at the point of writing this, so maybe I'll just shut up on the subject! That aside, the story is quite compelling. The idea of zombi This would have been a 5 star rating, but for a slightly irritating narrative technique that Lovecraft used. Each different chapter seems to recap the basic premise, in a similar fashion to some modern day tv programmes: "Before the break..." etc Now this may be due to the fact that it was initially serialised in some publication, a fact which has just occurred ot me at the point of writing this, so maybe I'll just shut up on the subject! That aside, the story is quite compelling. The idea of zombified corpses roaming the land is quite disturbing and Lovecraft invokes some wonderful detail and original twists into the idea.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Baal Of

    Ahhh, Lovecraft, you fucking racist, always having to mar your stories with your nasty judgmental shit. I love the ideas, but hate the way you were mired in your time. Anyway, this one is clearly serialized, since each chapter starts with a recap of what went before, so there is a lot of repetition, But the reason it gets three stars is because it inspired one of my all-time favorite zombie movies. It's got a decapitated zombie that speaks from the head it carries around in a suitcase for fucks Ahhh, Lovecraft, you fucking racist, always having to mar your stories with your nasty judgmental shit. I love the ideas, but hate the way you were mired in your time. Anyway, this one is clearly serialized, since each chapter starts with a recap of what went before, so there is a lot of repetition, But the reason it gets three stars is because it inspired one of my all-time favorite zombie movies. It's got a decapitated zombie that speaks from the head it carries around in a suitcase for fucks sake, which gives it points in my book. And the way West's creatures gather together and collude to rip him apart is fucking awesome, even if it's completely unexplained.

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