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The Essential Cuisines of Mexico: Revised and Updated Throughout, with More than 30 New Recipes

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More than twenty-five years ago, when Diana Kennedy published The Cuisines of Mexico, knowledge and appreciation of authentic Mexican cooking were in their infancy. But change was in the air. Home cooks were turning to Julia Child for an introduction to French cuisine and to Marcella Hazan for the tastes of Italy. Through Diana Kennedy they discovered a delicious and highl More than twenty-five years ago, when Diana Kennedy published The Cuisines of Mexico, knowledge and appreciation of authentic Mexican cooking were in their infancy. But change was in the air. Home cooks were turning to Julia Child for an introduction to French cuisine and to Marcella Hazan for the tastes of Italy. Through Diana Kennedy they discovered a delicious and highly developed culinary tradition they barely knew existed. The Cuisines of Mexico, Mexican Regional Cooking, and The Tortilla Book became best-sellers, and Diana Kennedy was recognized as the authority on Mexican food. Now a new generation has discovered that Mexican food is more than chimichangas, that they can find fresh hierbas de olor (pot herbs, including marjoram and Mexican bayleaf) and chilacas in their markets. The book that will become indispensable in their kitchens is The Essential Cuisines of Mexico. Diana has combined her three classic books in one volume, refining recipes when possible, bringing them up to date without losing the spirit of their generation. Old friends will be delighted to revisit these refreshed classics and to find more than thirty new recipes from different regions of Mexico. Among these discoveries are the very popular arroz a la tumbada (rice with seafood) from Veracruz, a pico de gallo with peaches from the state of Mexico, and tasty snacks from the cantinas of Mérida. Newcomers will delight in Diana's "word pictures" -- descriptions of her travels and discoveries -- and in her off-the-cuff comments. Whether they turn to this book for the final word on tamales, recipes for tasty antojitos to serve with drinks, or superb tacos, they will find there is no better teacher of Mexican food. How enviable to attempt for the first time Calzones del Diablo (yes, the Devil's Pants), and what a pleasure to succumb to Diana's passion for Mexican food.


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More than twenty-five years ago, when Diana Kennedy published The Cuisines of Mexico, knowledge and appreciation of authentic Mexican cooking were in their infancy. But change was in the air. Home cooks were turning to Julia Child for an introduction to French cuisine and to Marcella Hazan for the tastes of Italy. Through Diana Kennedy they discovered a delicious and highl More than twenty-five years ago, when Diana Kennedy published The Cuisines of Mexico, knowledge and appreciation of authentic Mexican cooking were in their infancy. But change was in the air. Home cooks were turning to Julia Child for an introduction to French cuisine and to Marcella Hazan for the tastes of Italy. Through Diana Kennedy they discovered a delicious and highly developed culinary tradition they barely knew existed. The Cuisines of Mexico, Mexican Regional Cooking, and The Tortilla Book became best-sellers, and Diana Kennedy was recognized as the authority on Mexican food. Now a new generation has discovered that Mexican food is more than chimichangas, that they can find fresh hierbas de olor (pot herbs, including marjoram and Mexican bayleaf) and chilacas in their markets. The book that will become indispensable in their kitchens is The Essential Cuisines of Mexico. Diana has combined her three classic books in one volume, refining recipes when possible, bringing them up to date without losing the spirit of their generation. Old friends will be delighted to revisit these refreshed classics and to find more than thirty new recipes from different regions of Mexico. Among these discoveries are the very popular arroz a la tumbada (rice with seafood) from Veracruz, a pico de gallo with peaches from the state of Mexico, and tasty snacks from the cantinas of Mérida. Newcomers will delight in Diana's "word pictures" -- descriptions of her travels and discoveries -- and in her off-the-cuff comments. Whether they turn to this book for the final word on tamales, recipes for tasty antojitos to serve with drinks, or superb tacos, they will find there is no better teacher of Mexican food. How enviable to attempt for the first time Calzones del Diablo (yes, the Devil's Pants), and what a pleasure to succumb to Diana's passion for Mexican food.

30 review for The Essential Cuisines of Mexico: Revised and Updated Throughout, with More than 30 New Recipes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Leighton

    Put down the chalupa; this ain't Taco Bell. It's not even Rick Bayless, not that I'm down on him or anything. But I think he would agree that Diana Kennedy is the place to start if you want to learn to cook mole poblano, make your own tortillas (yes, it's worth every minute) and generally discover the richness and regional variety of Mexican cooking. I have run into only a couple of recipes that require an ingredient you can't easily get on Buford Highway. Good stuff. My only reservation about t Put down the chalupa; this ain't Taco Bell. It's not even Rick Bayless, not that I'm down on him or anything. But I think he would agree that Diana Kennedy is the place to start if you want to learn to cook mole poblano, make your own tortillas (yes, it's worth every minute) and generally discover the richness and regional variety of Mexican cooking. I have run into only a couple of recipes that require an ingredient you can't easily get on Buford Highway. Good stuff. My only reservation about this book -- and it's not a criticism -- is that several of the recipes call for cuts of meat that Americans of my generation do not consider food. That's our provincialism, of course, but there it is. Still, I'm sure similar criticisms were possible when Kennedy wrote the book, and I'm glad she didn't compromise authenticity for the sake of easy acceptance.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cherie

    Eh. Disappointingly meat-heavy. (I've been to Mexico and most of the times it wasn't that hard. Sigh.) Eh. Disappointingly meat-heavy. (I've been to Mexico and most of the times it wasn't that hard. Sigh.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    Another no nonsense cookbook: just recipes supplemented with information on techniques and ingredients. The recipes are accessible, i.e., not overly complicated or time-consuming, and the flavors are good. An excellent catalog of the variety of Mexican cuisine.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ashani

    Diana's previous 3 books are bound together in this one ! What a nostalgic read this has been ! Diana's previous 3 books are bound together in this one ! What a nostalgic read this has been !

  5. 4 out of 5

    Margery Osborne

    must read

  6. 5 out of 5

    Yaaresse

    My rating reflects my feelings about the Kindle edition of this book. The content of this book is about a 4.5, but other non-content factors are closer to a 1.0. I used to own this book. I remember it was very good, and I learned a lot from it. Somewhere, over the years, it disappeared, either borrowed and never returned or a sacrifice to the God of Moving or stolen by space aliens. Who knows? When I saw the Kindle format come up for a ridiculously cheap price, I thought I might replace it. As i My rating reflects my feelings about the Kindle edition of this book. The content of this book is about a 4.5, but other non-content factors are closer to a 1.0. I used to own this book. I remember it was very good, and I learned a lot from it. Somewhere, over the years, it disappeared, either borrowed and never returned or a sacrifice to the God of Moving or stolen by space aliens. Who knows? When I saw the Kindle format come up for a ridiculously cheap price, I thought I might replace it. As is my habit, I downloaded the sample to be sure. Even at an almost-free price, there's no point in obtaining it if I can't use it. Glad I did that because the formatting of this book is terrible. Thing is, the more I think about it, the more I think it might not be too unlike the print formatting, but some things are not nearly as annoying on paper, and putting the ingredient list in bold, tightly-kerned ALL CAPS FONT is one of those things. Wordy instructions in long tightly-spaced paragraphs is another. Maybe I had more patience with that stuff 15+ years ago. My eyes were definitely younger and strong then. Bottom line: The formatting of this is migraine bait. If you don't mind dealing with the font, aren't vegetarian, and can follow a recipe without needing a bunch of photos, it's well worth obtaining. For me, legibility is a priority in a cookbook, so I won't be replacing my MIA print edition.

  7. 5 out of 5

    תניה

    A compilation volume of Diana Kennedy's 3 books: "The Cuisines of Mexico", "The Tortilla Book" and "Mexican Regional Cooking". Great buy! Diana Kennedy is a recognised authority on Mexican cuisine having dedicated most of her life to its study. And I love it! Kennedy has something that is palpably missing from Rick Bayless's "Authentic Mexican" - she specifies origin of dishes. She, very wisely, goes about this book from a regional point of view; all the chapters are organised in the expected wa A compilation volume of Diana Kennedy's 3 books: "The Cuisines of Mexico", "The Tortilla Book" and "Mexican Regional Cooking". Great buy! Diana Kennedy is a recognised authority on Mexican cuisine having dedicated most of her life to its study. And I love it! Kennedy has something that is palpably missing from Rick Bayless's "Authentic Mexican" - she specifies origin of dishes. She, very wisely, goes about this book from a regional point of view; all the chapters are organised in the expected way: starters, mains, snacks, yadda yadda yadda, but within these she organised recipes by region. Mexico has a very wide range of different regional cuisines and although they have the basic ingredients in common, certain other ingredients and techniques are only found in specific parts of the country and it is important for the culinary student who seeks authenticity and accuracy to be aware of the differences. Kennedy makes this exceptionally easy. I can't wait to find an affordable copy of her "Oaxaca al Gusto: An Infinite Gastronomy".

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cami

    Although the recipes in this book are excellent and authentic, as a cookbook it is very difficult to get into and follow. The sections are set up regionally instead of the typical appetizers, entrees, dessert set-up of most cookbooks I encounter. This is almost more interesting as book to read cover to cover, containing many interesting stories about the native Mexican cooks that the author received her tutelage and recipes from. However, I rated it in view that it is a cookbook and hence, two st Although the recipes in this book are excellent and authentic, as a cookbook it is very difficult to get into and follow. The sections are set up regionally instead of the typical appetizers, entrees, dessert set-up of most cookbooks I encounter. This is almost more interesting as book to read cover to cover, containing many interesting stories about the native Mexican cooks that the author received her tutelage and recipes from. However, I rated it in view that it is a cookbook and hence, two stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    This is one of my favorite cookbooks. Reading and cooking the recipes in this book is both a culinary and cultural adventure. Tracing the history of colonization, indigenous foods, and the widely varying traditions of different regions of Mexico, Diane Kennedy has brought a lot of joy to my life and kitchen by making these cuisines available to a wider audience. I love cooking and eating the soups, moles, salsas, pescados and everything in between. Amazing food!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dave Laskowski

    Diana knows her Mexican cooking Full of very useful information and great recipes I, however, love Tex Mex despite Diana not liking it. I will try her recipes as well as Rick Bayless as they sound really good

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Oh Diana Kennedy. I grew up with a copy of The Cuisines of Mexico; though I love my Essential Cuisines, whenever I'm sick in body or heart, it's that familiar oxblood leather-bound book that I turn to, huddled on the couch under an afghan, and it soothes me every time. Oh Diana Kennedy. I grew up with a copy of The Cuisines of Mexico; though I love my Essential Cuisines, whenever I'm sick in body or heart, it's that familiar oxblood leather-bound book that I turn to, huddled on the couch under an afghan, and it soothes me every time.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    One of the things I love about Diana Kennedy's cookbooks, is that it's not just the recipes. There is also commentary about ingredients, experiences, and people she has met, which makes her cookbooks far more engaging. One of the things I love about Diana Kennedy's cookbooks, is that it's not just the recipes. There is also commentary about ingredients, experiences, and people she has met, which makes her cookbooks far more engaging.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I constantly discover new and wonderful recipes in this book. The recipes taste authentic and wonderful! You'll impress your family and guests with any dish from Kennedy's recipes. I constantly discover new and wonderful recipes in this book. The recipes taste authentic and wonderful! You'll impress your family and guests with any dish from Kennedy's recipes.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne

    20.00

  15. 5 out of 5

    nicole

    not rated since i didn't cook anything, but interesting to read! not rated since i didn't cook anything, but interesting to read!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brian Mcdaniel

    Read it only for the anthropological interest. Its easier to put together basic mexican food yourself by mixing and matching elements found at the local mexican grocery.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    A great reference but probably way too focused on authenticity to be a practical resource.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Grace Sobieralski

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ellyn Smith

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hjiglray

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cherokee Tyson

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alice M. White

  23. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anne Bourget

  25. 4 out of 5

    Evergreengirl

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  28. 4 out of 5

    Judith

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zachary Weil

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