counter create hit Lincoln's White House: The People's House in Wartime - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Lincoln's White House: The People's House in Wartime

Availability: Ready to download

Lincolns White House is the first book devoted to capturing the look, feel, and smell of the executive mansion from Lincolns inauguration in 1861 to his assassination in 1865. James Conroy brings to life the people who knew it, from servants to cabinet secretaries. We see the constant stream of visitors, from ordinary citizens to visiting dignitaries and diplomats. Conroy Lincoln’s White House is the first book devoted to capturing the look, feel, and smell of the executive mansion from Lincoln’s inauguration in 1861 to his assassination in 1865. James Conroy brings to life the people who knew it, from servants to cabinet secretaries. We see the constant stream of visitors, from ordinary citizens to visiting dignitaries and diplomats. Conroy enables the reader to see how the Lincolns lived and how the administration conducted day-to-day business during four of the most tumultuous years in American history. Relying on fresh research and a character-driven narrative and drawing on untapped primary sources, he takes the reader on a behind-the-scenes tour that provides new insight into how Lincoln lived, led the government, conducted war, and ultimately, unified the country to build a better government of, by, and for the people.


Compare
Ads Banner

Lincolns White House is the first book devoted to capturing the look, feel, and smell of the executive mansion from Lincolns inauguration in 1861 to his assassination in 1865. James Conroy brings to life the people who knew it, from servants to cabinet secretaries. We see the constant stream of visitors, from ordinary citizens to visiting dignitaries and diplomats. Conroy Lincoln’s White House is the first book devoted to capturing the look, feel, and smell of the executive mansion from Lincoln’s inauguration in 1861 to his assassination in 1865. James Conroy brings to life the people who knew it, from servants to cabinet secretaries. We see the constant stream of visitors, from ordinary citizens to visiting dignitaries and diplomats. Conroy enables the reader to see how the Lincolns lived and how the administration conducted day-to-day business during four of the most tumultuous years in American history. Relying on fresh research and a character-driven narrative and drawing on untapped primary sources, he takes the reader on a behind-the-scenes tour that provides new insight into how Lincoln lived, led the government, conducted war, and ultimately, unified the country to build a better government of, by, and for the people.

30 review for Lincoln's White House: The People's House in Wartime

  1. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Jerviss

    2 1/2-3 stars. I read this book because it won the Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize, and the subject matter sounded interesting. The book does contain fascinating material, but Conroy seems unsure what to do with it all. In spite of the author's grandly stated intention to portray the Executive Mansion as "a rallying point for the war, a sounding board for the people, a platform for social change, and an engine for racial progress p. 5)," the book reads more like a compiled collection of amusing 2 1/2-3 stars. I read this book because it won the Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize, and the subject matter sounded interesting. The book does contain fascinating material, but Conroy seems unsure what to do with it all. In spite of the author's grandly stated intention to portray the Executive Mansion as "a rallying point for the war, a sounding board for the people, a platform for social change, and an engine for racial progress p. 5)," the book reads more like a compiled collection of amusing anecdotes than a work of substantive Lincoln scholarship. "Life in the White House" encompasses everything from mundane descriptions of office furniture and White House stationery to rather extensive biographical material on John Nicolay, John Hay, and Mary Todd Lincoln. Again, an absorbing read, but ultimately too unfocused for my tastes.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Leidner

    If you have an interest in what life in Lincoln's White House was like during the Civil War, James B. Conroy's book is the definitive word. Using over two hundred primary and secondary sources, he weaves a fascinating behind-the-scenes story of the lives of Abraham Lincoln, his family, his staff and visitors in the Executive Mansion. Lincoln's accomplishments become nobler, and his wife's schemes plainer, in this well-written narrative life at the top in wartime.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Harris

    I am always profoundly interested in non fiction history that is fresh and interesting. This investigation of Washington and the White House during Lincolns time in office is fun, informative, and well written. It moved quickly and, if a history buff can find some new tidbits to learn, I consider that a success! I am always profoundly interested in non fiction history that is fresh and interesting. This investigation of Washington and the White House during Lincoln’s time in office is fun, informative, and well written. It moved quickly and, if a history buff can find some new tidbits to learn, I consider that a success!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mike Stewart

    An antidote to the current White House and its odious occupant. Conroy vividly recreates the White House of 1861-65, attempting to give the reader a sense of what it was like to live and work there, and to wander through its halls (as the general public was free to do). Although her image has been somewhat resurrected in recent years, Mary Lincoln comes off very poorly- vain, petty, venal, self-centered, etc. Lincoln was supposedly drawn to her by her interest in politics and shrewd political An antidote to the current White House and its odious occupant. Conroy vividly recreates the White House of 1861-65, attempting to give the reader a sense of what it was like to live and work there, and to wander through its halls (as the general public was free to do). Although her image has been somewhat resurrected in recent years, Mary Lincoln comes off very poorly- vain, petty, venal, self-centered, etc. Lincoln was supposedly drawn to her by her interest in politics and shrewd political instincts. If that was the case, judging by her obliviousness to the optics of her behavior, these instincts must have deserted her by the time she became First Lady. I suspect Herndon, who knew her well and detested her, had it right. Lincoln, on the other hand, while all too human, is seen as the unaffected, humane, highly intelligent man he undoubtedly was. Conroy's research is first rate. He has unearthed details and anecdotes which I have encountered for the first time.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Good read on what the White House was like during Lincoln's presidency Well-constructed book, drawn from first- hand account source material, on what the White House was like, including how the president and staff conducted business, during the Lincoln presidency.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gerry Connolly

    In Lincoln's White House James Conroy has recreated the atmosphere in and physical layout of the civil war era White House. Unceasing office seekers and endless streams of visitors plagued Lincoln for all four years of his tenure.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    a good read on life in the White House during the Civil War. It does go into details on the various schemes used by hiss wife to pad her expenses and the fudging of accounts. It gives a very honest history of life before assassinations became normal.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marshall

    Very interesting anecdotal account of life in the White House during Lincolns tenure, with an emphasis on the staff and family. Very interesting anecdotal account of life in the White House during Lincoln’s tenure, with an emphasis on the staff and family.

  9. 4 out of 5

    C.C.

    Clear and well ordered The look behind the curtain of Lincolns White House makes the Lincoln family more accessible and real. Not just statuary or photos. Clear and well ordered The look behind the curtain of Lincoln’s White House makes the Lincoln family more accessible and real. Not just statuary or photos.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Patricia LaChance

    Liked was well written.

  11. 4 out of 5

    James

    A remarkable look at chaos and clarity in the White House during Lincoln's time. I had an ancestor who visited Lincoln and I wanted to see what that must have been like. She caught him on a good day and with a letter of introduction from Lincoln to Blair she got a job in the Government. An absolute fascinating time which Conroy's book does it justice.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Glenn

  13. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey Blaha

  14. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  15. 5 out of 5

    robert purtock

  16. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chris Slavin

  18. 5 out of 5

    MWAD049a

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  20. 4 out of 5

    John Vuotto

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anne

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ebrussell

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Bradley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tom Link

  26. 5 out of 5

    Erik Snell

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ben Wilson

  28. 5 out of 5

    Randy Morrison

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kara

  30. 4 out of 5

    Robert

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.