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Decision Quality: Value Creation from Better Business Decisions

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Add value with every decision using a simple yet powerful framework Few things are as valuable in business, and in life, as the ability to make good decisions. Can you imagine how much more rewarding your life and your business would be if every decision you made were the best it could be? Decision Quality empowers you to make the best possible choice and get more of what Add value with every decision using a simple yet powerful framework Few things are as valuable in business, and in life, as the ability to make good decisions. Can you imagine how much more rewarding your life and your business would be if every decision you made were the best it could be? Decision Quality empowers you to make the best possible choice and get more of what you truly want from every decision. Dr. Carl Spetzler is a leader in the field of decision science and has worked with organizations across industries to improve their decision-making capabilities. He and his co-authors, all experienced consultants and educators in this field, show you how to frame a problem or opportunity, create a set of attractive alternatives, identify relevant uncertain information, clarify the values that are important in the decision, apply tools of analysis, and develop buy-in among stakeholders. Their straightforward approach is elegantly simple, yet practical and powerful. It can be applied to all types of decisions. Our business and our personal lives are marked by a stream of decisions. Some are small. Some are large. Some are life-altering or strategic. How well we make those decisions truly matters. This book gives you a framework and thinking tools that will help you to improve the odds of getting more of what you value from every choice. You will learn: The six requirements for decision quality, and how to apply them The difference between a good decision and a good outcome Why a decision can only be as good as the best of the available alternatives Methods for making both "significant" and strategic decisions The mental traps that undermine decision quality and how to avoid them How to deal with uncertainty—a factor in every important choice How to judge the quality of a decision at the time you're making it How organizations have benefited from building quality into their decisions. Many people are satisfied with 'good enough' when making important decisions. This book provides a method that will take you and your co-workers beyond 'good enough' to true Decision Quality.


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Add value with every decision using a simple yet powerful framework Few things are as valuable in business, and in life, as the ability to make good decisions. Can you imagine how much more rewarding your life and your business would be if every decision you made were the best it could be? Decision Quality empowers you to make the best possible choice and get more of what Add value with every decision using a simple yet powerful framework Few things are as valuable in business, and in life, as the ability to make good decisions. Can you imagine how much more rewarding your life and your business would be if every decision you made were the best it could be? Decision Quality empowers you to make the best possible choice and get more of what you truly want from every decision. Dr. Carl Spetzler is a leader in the field of decision science and has worked with organizations across industries to improve their decision-making capabilities. He and his co-authors, all experienced consultants and educators in this field, show you how to frame a problem or opportunity, create a set of attractive alternatives, identify relevant uncertain information, clarify the values that are important in the decision, apply tools of analysis, and develop buy-in among stakeholders. Their straightforward approach is elegantly simple, yet practical and powerful. It can be applied to all types of decisions. Our business and our personal lives are marked by a stream of decisions. Some are small. Some are large. Some are life-altering or strategic. How well we make those decisions truly matters. This book gives you a framework and thinking tools that will help you to improve the odds of getting more of what you value from every choice. You will learn: The six requirements for decision quality, and how to apply them The difference between a good decision and a good outcome Why a decision can only be as good as the best of the available alternatives Methods for making both "significant" and strategic decisions The mental traps that undermine decision quality and how to avoid them How to deal with uncertainty—a factor in every important choice How to judge the quality of a decision at the time you're making it How organizations have benefited from building quality into their decisions. Many people are satisfied with 'good enough' when making important decisions. This book provides a method that will take you and your co-workers beyond 'good enough' to true Decision Quality.

30 review for Decision Quality: Value Creation from Better Business Decisions

  1. 4 out of 5

    Frank Calberg

    What I found particularly useful reading the book: 1. What is the real problem that needs to be solved? - Page 22: Find the reasons for the problem. - Page 150: Avoid dragging the real problem over to a problem you know how to solve. Understand and define the real problem that needs to be solved. - Page 151: Ask yourself how someone with a different skill set or experience would think of the situation. - Page 172: Are you solving the right problem? 2. What possibilities and alternatives are there to s What I found particularly useful reading the book: 1. What is the real problem that needs to be solved? - Page 22: Find the reasons for the problem. - Page 150: Avoid dragging the real problem over to a problem you know how to solve. Understand and define the real problem that needs to be solved. - Page 151: Ask yourself how someone with a different skill set or experience would think of the situation. - Page 172: Are you solving the right problem? 2. What possibilities and alternatives are there to solve the problem? - Page 14: A decision cannot be better than the best alternative. - Page 60: What is the wildest idea that has been considered? - Page 60: What external people will you ask to suggest alternatives? - Page 60: Do the alternatives, you have, cover all potential sources of value? - Page 60: Are differences between alternatives clear and significant? - Pages 94 and 103: To help yourself decide between alternatives, draw a simple decision tree. - Page 106: What is the best alternative? Why is this alternative better than the others? 3. What are possible outcomes and probabilities of doing x? - Page 15: What are some possible outcomes of doing x? - Page 15: When you do x, what is the probability that y will happen? - Page 66: Quality information must be relevant and reliable. - Page 72: Who will you ask to get a second opinion about what the probability is that y will happen? - Page 76: If you had more time / money, what additional information would you seek? - Page 113: Involving people in or becoming involved in decision-making engenders a sense of ownership that results in commitment and effectiveness during implementation. - Page 134: What facts do you have? Note that stories, you hear / read, are not necessarily true. - Page 138 and 149: Avoid taking part in group-think during which a group generates overconfidence in what they think and closes their minds to contrary views. In this regard, do not confuse agreeing with good decision making. - Page 145: Avoid making unsupported assumptions and treating them as facts. 4. What values, purpose and personality do you have? What is needed for good decision making? - Page 16: The clearer you are about which values are important for you, the easier it becomes for you to make a decision about what to do when. - Page 31: To define your purpose, ask why you do what you do? - Page 81: What is it that you really want? What are your most important values? - Page 126: Avoid discrediting or ignoring information that does not fit your current way of thinking. Be open-minded. - Page 126: Strengthen curiosity. Avoid thinking that you know more than you do. - Page 127: Avoid holding on too long to current technology or strategies. When something is not working, move on. - Page 129: Extroverts prefer a decision process where they can talk things out in a group. Introverts prefer a decision process where they can write things down on their own. Additional research from the book: - Page 21: A decision making challenge starts when a person demands a decision. - Pages 3, 130 and 144: We often want to simplify, ignore what we don't think is important and settle for good enough. - Pages 7 and 116: We need to judge a decision at the time it is being made. Good decisions will generate more good outcomes, but they are not a guarantee. We cannot control outcomes, but we can control the choices we make. - Page 175: Perfection is the enemy of decision quality because it gives an excuse for delaying decisions that need to be made. - Page 175: We usually experience peace of mind when we are clear and feel good about our decision and are doing what makes sense and feels right.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brahm

    Many organizations are bad at making decisions. Decision Quality (DQ) is a framework to help leaders and teams make better decisions. I like the articulation of the "advocacy/approval megabias" (p152): - Advocacy myth: "in which effective advocacy is misinterpreted as evidence in the quality of the recommended decision" - Approval myth: "the idea that any proposed solution that is approved after intense interrogation by the approval body must be of high quality" I'm keen to use DQ to help make dec Many organizations are bad at making decisions. Decision Quality (DQ) is a framework to help leaders and teams make better decisions. I like the articulation of the "advocacy/approval megabias" (p152): - Advocacy myth: "in which effective advocacy is misinterpreted as evidence in the quality of the recommended decision" - Approval myth: "the idea that any proposed solution that is approved after intense interrogation by the approval body must be of high quality" I'm keen to use DQ to help make decisions. There are good tools and processes here. I'm rating 3 stars because I usually rate books on emotional impact, and there are several sections that are quite repetitive (maybe a function of the audience - people who need to hear these messages repeated), which makes for dry reading. Less repetition and more case studies would have been great.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Janel

    I read this as part of a Book Club at work. I found it very insightful on how to make quality decisions. The insights are both about the individual and the organization with respect to how decisions are made.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Easy to read, this book gives a disciplined approach to improve decisions, especially those that are more complex. Worth the effort.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    A nice introduction to decision science, pitfalls of normal decision-making and how to apply decision science into personal and business decisions. I liked the scaled up and simplified versions for use with strategic and significant decisions respectively. Made me want to know more about this field.

  6. 5 out of 5

    kim hartman

    Exceptional book for decision makers This is a must read for leader / executives required to make decisions as a significant component of their work. It provides a practical way to approach sections large and small.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kent Kostuk

  8. 5 out of 5

    Serhat Bilyaz

  9. 5 out of 5

    Antonio Gonzalez

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  11. 4 out of 5

    Turaj

  12. 5 out of 5

    Leo

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary-Pauline Vatsis

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shashwat

  15. 4 out of 5

    James Dolan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Kiroko

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gail Adrienne

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gowtham Varma

  19. 4 out of 5

    Margarida Frango

  20. 4 out of 5

    Felipe Leite

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ameen Amiri

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael Solstad

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cole Heap

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kanagat

  28. 4 out of 5

    James Bartel

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michael Seewald

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mario

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