counter create hit Feeling White: Whiteness, Emotionality, and Education - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Feeling White: Whiteness, Emotionality, and Education

Availability: Ready to download

Nominated--Society of Professors of Education Outstanding Book Award 2017. Discussing race and racism often conjures up emotions of guilt, shame, anger, defensiveness, denial, sadness, dissonance, and discomfort. Instead of suppressing those feelings, coined emotionalities of whiteness, they are, nonetheless, important to identify, understand, and deconstruct if one ever h Nominated--Society of Professors of Education Outstanding Book Award 2017. Discussing race and racism often conjures up emotions of guilt, shame, anger, defensiveness, denial, sadness, dissonance, and discomfort. Instead of suppressing those feelings, coined emotionalities of whiteness, they are, nonetheless, important to identify, understand, and deconstruct if one ever hopes to fully commit to racial equity. Feeling White: Whiteness, Emotionality, and Education delves deeper into these white emotionalities and other latent ones by providing theoretical and psychoanalytic analyses to determine where these emotions so stem, how they operate, and how they perpetuate racial inequities in education and society. The author beautifully weaves in creative writing with theoretical work to artistically illustrate how these emotions operate while also engaging the reader in an emotional experience in and of itself, claiming one must feel to understand. This book does not rehash former race concepts; rather, it applies them in novel ways that get at the heart of humanity, thus revealing how feeling white ultimately impacts race relations. Without a proper investigation on these underlying emotions, that can both stifle or enhance one's commitment to racial justice in education and society, the field of education denies itself a proper emotional preparation so needed to engage in prolonged educative projects of racial and social justice. By digging deep to what impacts humanity most--our hearts--this book dares to expose one's daily experiences with race, thus individually challenging us all to self-investigate our own racialized emotionalities. About the author: Cheryl E. Matias, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the School of Education and Human Development at the University of Colorado Denver. She is a motherscholar of three children, including boy-girl twins.


Compare
Ads Banner

Nominated--Society of Professors of Education Outstanding Book Award 2017. Discussing race and racism often conjures up emotions of guilt, shame, anger, defensiveness, denial, sadness, dissonance, and discomfort. Instead of suppressing those feelings, coined emotionalities of whiteness, they are, nonetheless, important to identify, understand, and deconstruct if one ever h Nominated--Society of Professors of Education Outstanding Book Award 2017. Discussing race and racism often conjures up emotions of guilt, shame, anger, defensiveness, denial, sadness, dissonance, and discomfort. Instead of suppressing those feelings, coined emotionalities of whiteness, they are, nonetheless, important to identify, understand, and deconstruct if one ever hopes to fully commit to racial equity. Feeling White: Whiteness, Emotionality, and Education delves deeper into these white emotionalities and other latent ones by providing theoretical and psychoanalytic analyses to determine where these emotions so stem, how they operate, and how they perpetuate racial inequities in education and society. The author beautifully weaves in creative writing with theoretical work to artistically illustrate how these emotions operate while also engaging the reader in an emotional experience in and of itself, claiming one must feel to understand. This book does not rehash former race concepts; rather, it applies them in novel ways that get at the heart of humanity, thus revealing how feeling white ultimately impacts race relations. Without a proper investigation on these underlying emotions, that can both stifle or enhance one's commitment to racial justice in education and society, the field of education denies itself a proper emotional preparation so needed to engage in prolonged educative projects of racial and social justice. By digging deep to what impacts humanity most--our hearts--this book dares to expose one's daily experiences with race, thus individually challenging us all to self-investigate our own racialized emotionalities. About the author: Cheryl E. Matias, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the School of Education and Human Development at the University of Colorado Denver. She is a motherscholar of three children, including boy-girl twins.

49 review for Feeling White: Whiteness, Emotionality, and Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Pete

    Matias writes, "This book is a project to reaffirm our humanity by recognizing the racialized states of our emotionalities, its association with the permanence of whiteness, and how education can be one avenue that can lead us down a path that liberates our communal heart." Doing so takes work, however, which Matias delineates over the course of the book---exploring how and why "feelings" have a symbiotic relationship with socially constructed norms. These norms, of course, often stem from *whit Matias writes, "This book is a project to reaffirm our humanity by recognizing the racialized states of our emotionalities, its association with the permanence of whiteness, and how education can be one avenue that can lead us down a path that liberates our communal heart." Doing so takes work, however, which Matias delineates over the course of the book---exploring how and why "feelings" have a symbiotic relationship with socially constructed norms. These norms, of course, often stem from *whiteness* as the hegemonic, driving force behind it all. Thus, we see from Matias' work precisely why it is (drawing from Noel Ignatiev) that a "betrayal to whiteness is loyalty to humanity." Selah.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Evans

    I've spent a lot of time wondering about how we can best integrate therapeutic understandings of emotion with critical race theory. Dr. Matias does that here in a way that is masterful and actively challenges the status quo—pushing her students to engage in difficult ways in the classroom, because trust and connection require discomfort. About 5 pages into reading the introduction in my library copy, I immediately went and bought another copy online for myself, because I knew it was one I'd revi I've spent a lot of time wondering about how we can best integrate therapeutic understandings of emotion with critical race theory. Dr. Matias does that here in a way that is masterful and actively challenges the status quo—pushing her students to engage in difficult ways in the classroom, because trust and connection require discomfort. About 5 pages into reading the introduction in my library copy, I immediately went and bought another copy online for myself, because I knew it was one I'd revisit again. 5/5 stars for sure.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Completed for graduate level course in educational psychology and diverse learners — Dr. Matias evaluates how race plays out in society and the classroom, and specifically, how white pre-service teachers can strategically and authentically care for their students from all backgrounds.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Had to read this for my diversity class. It is written like a series of higher ed essays but was still easy to understand. This book is an essential read for every teacher.

  5. 5 out of 5

    CJ Venable

    I think this book is very important, but was a mixed bag for me personally. Some of the analysis was extremely powerful and valuable to challenge me as a White person to consider more deeply my complicity in Whiteness and colonization. Some of the connections, however, did not work for me. In particular, some of the author's personal narratives about motherhood fell flat for me as a nonbinary trans person. Perhaps it was my own discomfort at personal sharing in scholarly work (or the tone that w I think this book is very important, but was a mixed bag for me personally. Some of the analysis was extremely powerful and valuable to challenge me as a White person to consider more deeply my complicity in Whiteness and colonization. Some of the connections, however, did not work for me. In particular, some of the author's personal narratives about motherhood fell flat for me as a nonbinary trans person. Perhaps it was my own discomfort at personal sharing in scholarly work (or the tone that was used to do so) that threw me off. I've been wrestling with whether or not my Whiteness is causing me to be overly critical of some of these moments. I'm still unsure. One thing I would have liked more of was deep engagement with the literature and theorizing about Whiteness. Some of the chapters felt repetitive and much of the literature in each chapter was used in subsequent chapters. While it's certainly not a bad idea to reinforce concepts, having essentially the same point and the same quote from a text used repeatedly felt unhelpful and could have had a greater impact if there was a greater variety of literature used and argument made. Sometimes I felt like just as some deep engagement was established and a source (like Fanon's Black Skin, White Masks or Memmi's The Colonizer and the Colonized), a chapter ended and a new topic was introduced. Perhaps this book's intended audience is someone for whom these concepts are new, but I was hoping for a deeper dive into this theorization. I'm excited to see what comes next as more complex theorization and analysis of Whiteness develops from/alongside this work.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Timothy J Carrier

    If you want to read a collection of essays that uncritically lays out post modernist/Marxian/Freudian thinking on race and education in America, this is it. It's as if the author of has never familiarized herself with the knockdown arguments against what appear to be her received wisdom. It's very lightly sourced and heavily relies on the genre's habit of treating anecdotal stories (think poor man's T. N. Coates) as normative. It's also heart breaking in its illustration of the self indulgent "f If you want to read a collection of essays that uncritically lays out post modernist/Marxian/Freudian thinking on race and education in America, this is it. It's as if the author of has never familiarized herself with the knockdown arguments against what appear to be her received wisdom. It's very lightly sourced and heavily relies on the genre's habit of treating anecdotal stories (think poor man's T. N. Coates) as normative. It's also heart breaking in its illustration of the self indulgent "fear" of the author. She actually shares a moment of terror she imparts on her 7 year old son. Explaining to the probably confused as hell kid that his skin tone makes him a target on a daily basis for marauding police. Setting aside whether there is in fact a nationwide crises of police assassinating people of color, wtf does she think she is accomplishing by frightening her 7 yo???

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Nieder

  8. 4 out of 5

    sarah

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cami

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  11. 4 out of 5

    Binh Phan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

  13. 4 out of 5

    Xgirl

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  15. 5 out of 5

    Diane

  16. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Toliver

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Merica

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Intrabartola

  20. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dana

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lee

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ying

  24. 5 out of 5

    Erika Reece Bloembergen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dean Ramser

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  27. 4 out of 5

    Crazyarms777

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tashia

  29. 4 out of 5

    ErinM

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Sierk

  31. 5 out of 5

    Armartinez

  32. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

  33. 5 out of 5

    khafilah malik

  34. 5 out of 5

    Logan

  35. 5 out of 5

    Megan McDanel

  36. 5 out of 5

    Concetta

  37. 4 out of 5

    Ariel Steele

  38. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  39. 4 out of 5

    Liliana

  40. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  41. 5 out of 5

    April D.

  42. 5 out of 5

    Armartinez

  43. 5 out of 5

    Jeani

  44. 5 out of 5

    Celestia

  45. 5 out of 5

    Harry Brich

  46. 5 out of 5

    Karly Grice

  47. 5 out of 5

    Laura Williams

  48. 4 out of 5

    Jennyjojohnson

  49. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.