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Deadmonton: Crime Stories from Canada's Murder City

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In 2011, the lives of 48 Edmontonians came to a sudden, violent end, leading to the city of Edmonton gaining the dubious moniker of the year: "Murder Capital of Canada." It wasn't the first time the city of champions had snagged the title nobody wants to claim. In Deadmonton, former Edmonton Sun reporter Pamela Roth takes a look at some of Edmonton's most notorious murders, In 2011, the lives of 48 Edmontonians came to a sudden, violent end, leading to the city of Edmonton gaining the dubious moniker of the year: "Murder Capital of Canada." It wasn't the first time the city of champions had snagged the title nobody wants to claim. In Deadmonton, former Edmonton Sun reporter Pamela Roth takes a look at some of Edmonton's most notorious murders, both solved and unsolved. Told first-hand by the victims' families, these stories serve as a disturbing reminder of the horror that humans are capable of inflicting upon each other, and highlight the immense sadness and pain left in the wake of these crimes. But Deadmonton also gives a glimpse into the lives of detectives working tirelessly to bring closure to the families and justice to the victims' names.


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In 2011, the lives of 48 Edmontonians came to a sudden, violent end, leading to the city of Edmonton gaining the dubious moniker of the year: "Murder Capital of Canada." It wasn't the first time the city of champions had snagged the title nobody wants to claim. In Deadmonton, former Edmonton Sun reporter Pamela Roth takes a look at some of Edmonton's most notorious murders, In 2011, the lives of 48 Edmontonians came to a sudden, violent end, leading to the city of Edmonton gaining the dubious moniker of the year: "Murder Capital of Canada." It wasn't the first time the city of champions had snagged the title nobody wants to claim. In Deadmonton, former Edmonton Sun reporter Pamela Roth takes a look at some of Edmonton's most notorious murders, both solved and unsolved. Told first-hand by the victims' families, these stories serve as a disturbing reminder of the horror that humans are capable of inflicting upon each other, and highlight the immense sadness and pain left in the wake of these crimes. But Deadmonton also gives a glimpse into the lives of detectives working tirelessly to bring closure to the families and justice to the victims' names.

30 review for Deadmonton: Crime Stories from Canada's Murder City

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fishface

    This was a good read, collecting 45 murders that have taken place in and around Edmonton, Alberta from the 1980s or so until just a couple of years back. Although as a Detroiter I was a little puzzled that 47 murders in one year would seem that outrageous, I was disturbed at how many of them are languishing unsolved and even more disturbed at the reoccurring scenario of someone walking into, out of, or past a bar or nightclub, only to be set upon by a mob of angry drunks with knives or workboots This was a good read, collecting 45 murders that have taken place in and around Edmonton, Alberta from the 1980s or so until just a couple of years back. Although as a Detroiter I was a little puzzled that 47 murders in one year would seem that outrageous, I was disturbed at how many of them are languishing unsolved and even more disturbed at the reoccurring scenario of someone walking into, out of, or past a bar or nightclub, only to be set upon by a mob of angry drunks with knives or workboots or some other weapon. And the number of cases with a zillion witnesses and nobody who wants to talk...that was disturbing too. But none of that bothered me as much as a police unit called KARE, supposedly out there protecting prostitutes, but whose only function -- at least all this author cares to tell us -- is to collect DNA samples and so forth from the women in case they turn up dead. Cheesus grits.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karlie

    Disappointed in this book. The writing is very bland and, although each murder case discussed in the book is unique, the author somehow manages to be very repetitive. I found that she didn't include nearly enough details about the murders themselves or the investigations, and used too many quotes from officers and family members of victims which, naturally, were all quite similar. Some of the chapters were only three pages long and read like brief newspaper articles. There were a few interesting Disappointed in this book. The writing is very bland and, although each murder case discussed in the book is unique, the author somehow manages to be very repetitive. I found that she didn't include nearly enough details about the murders themselves or the investigations, and used too many quotes from officers and family members of victims which, naturally, were all quite similar. Some of the chapters were only three pages long and read like brief newspaper articles. There were a few interesting cases discussed, but overall I wouldn't recommend this book. I also found it unnerving that the author included exact addresses of some of these crimes - i can't imagine the residents love having hat information broadcast, if they even knew about it in the first place. Contrary to the back of the book, this book covers more than just the murders that occurred in 2011.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    I read a lot of true crime but as an Edmontonian, this was hard. The book is a good mix of crimes both cold and solved. The author includes interviews with police and families, making the stories deeply touching and giving good insight into the people who spend their lives working so hard to solve these crimes.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Glen Farrelly

    I recently moved to Edmonton for work (as many have done before me). As I'm a fan of local history and true crime, my family got this book for me recently for a birthday gift. Edmonton has an exceptionally high murder rate for its population of a million, which has earned it the status of murder capital of Canada. Some of this is due to the boom and bust economy of Alberta, but the overall reasons are varied. Edmonton earned the nickname "Deadmonton" not because of its many murders, but rather d I recently moved to Edmonton for work (as many have done before me). As I'm a fan of local history and true crime, my family got this book for me recently for a birthday gift. Edmonton has an exceptionally high murder rate for its population of a million, which has earned it the status of murder capital of Canada. Some of this is due to the boom and bust economy of Alberta, but the overall reasons are varied. Edmonton earned the nickname "Deadmonton" not because of its many murders, but rather due to its lack of a social and cultural life (which isn't true anymore). This book is a collection of short, newspaper-type stories covering 50 murders in the last four decades here. I've read true crime before and this book is quite different. It doesn't focus on the sleuthing or forensics of murder cases. Instead, this author interviews victims' friends and families and the detectives to poignantly address the great human cost of crime in this city and its horrible lingering effects lasting decades for those affected. I generally prefer more whodunit type mysteries, but this book made me realize how those stories often dehumanize the victims and ignore the dreadful impact on the victims (let alone the detectives). The author covers the murders and impacts with the same care whether the victims were sex workers, addicts, gang members, or wild partiers. I appreciate this as it is surprising how often our coverage of murder victims has an implicit (or even explicit!) moral judgement - those deemed less innocent are not given the same amount of coverage or basic human respect. Many true-crime stories end with the conviction. However, this book also covers the often ridiculously easy sentences that murderers get in Canada and the impact of this lack of justice has on the victims. Overall, this is an important book for locals, Albertans, and Canadians to read to gain a much better sense of the true cost of the murders that quickly gain a lot of media attention but then just as quickly fade from memory.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Jensen

    I read this book because my daughter and her husband live in Edmonton. Unsurprisingly, I suppose, I found it depressing. Some of the cases have been solved, others remain open. Something which I have not previously fully appreciated is that those most vulnerable members of society - mentally ill or compromised, poor, addicts, etc - are also the most frequent targets of murder. It seems unfair that people born into poverty and/or dysfunctional families pay the price throughout their lives for a p I read this book because my daughter and her husband live in Edmonton. Unsurprisingly, I suppose, I found it depressing. Some of the cases have been solved, others remain open. Something which I have not previously fully appreciated is that those most vulnerable members of society - mentally ill or compromised, poor, addicts, etc - are also the most frequent targets of murder. It seems unfair that people born into poverty and/or dysfunctional families pay the price throughout their lives for a poor beginning, something over which they had no choice.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tess

    Each chapter focuses on a specific murder or groups together similar murders that occurred in Edmonton, AB. Some of the stories are interesting but far too much focus is placed on the emotions of friends and families of the victims because of course people are sad and angry. More facts to each event would have been of more interest. Of cases that are not solved more information of what police know about suspects would also be helpful.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lael

    As an Edmontonian, I have an intense urge to train and maintain a very large, protective attack dog after reading this book! It scared me. Just...wow. The book itself was ok, a quick read. The stories read like newspaper articles-The author was a reporter after all-so if that's your jam, you're in luck! As an Edmontonian, I have an intense urge to train and maintain a very large, protective attack dog after reading this book! It scared me. Just...wow. The book itself was ok, a quick read. The stories read like newspaper articles-The author was a reporter after all-so if that's your jam, you're in luck!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Turnip Cake

    Good bathroom book, the histories are brief and good for short reading moments.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicola

    It was very interesting to read about the behind the scenes investigations into these murders, many of them which happened during the time I've lived in Edmonton and are familiar news stories. It's a morbid topic, but homicide investigations never fail to fascinate me. It was very interesting to read about the behind the scenes investigations into these murders, many of them which happened during the time I've lived in Edmonton and are familiar news stories. It's a morbid topic, but homicide investigations never fail to fascinate me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Myers

    A solid collection of reporting by former Edmonton Sun reporter, Pamela Roth.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Interesting enough, and updated some cases I hadn't caught the resolution on. I do take exception to the title, though. "Deadmonton" doesn't bother me, but the reference to Canada's Murder City is just plain sensationalistic. I'm fairly certain there are a few other cities that have earned that distinction more consistently than Edmonton's two separate years. Interesting enough, and updated some cases I hadn't caught the resolution on. I do take exception to the title, though. "Deadmonton" doesn't bother me, but the reference to Canada's Murder City is just plain sensationalistic. I'm fairly certain there are a few other cities that have earned that distinction more consistently than Edmonton's two separate years.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Justin

  13. 4 out of 5

    Liesha Kupser

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Childs

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ashley England

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alma

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lori Mitchell

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sar

  19. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alison

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jordhana Rempel

  22. 4 out of 5

    Haley

  23. 4 out of 5

    Darcee

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dallas

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Derkson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Chorney

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kendra Mills

  29. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Darren Brenneis

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