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Judgment at Verdant Court

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The continuing adventures of Christopher Sinclair, mechanical engineer turned priest of war. Our hero faces evil on two fronts: a friend turned murderer by the power of magic, and an entire nation of murderous wolf-men. One he has to save from the vengeful clutches of the Druids, and the other from the mercenary greed of the king. But the true enemy is despair: the shame o The continuing adventures of Christopher Sinclair, mechanical engineer turned priest of war. Our hero faces evil on two fronts: a friend turned murderer by the power of magic, and an entire nation of murderous wolf-men. One he has to save from the vengeful clutches of the Druids, and the other from the mercenary greed of the king. But the true enemy is despair: the shame of a man who has done terrible things, and the madness of a man who is doing terrible violence. Can Christopher pick a path through broken and bloody bodies that still leaves room for goodness? From the Trade Paperback edition.


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The continuing adventures of Christopher Sinclair, mechanical engineer turned priest of war. Our hero faces evil on two fronts: a friend turned murderer by the power of magic, and an entire nation of murderous wolf-men. One he has to save from the vengeful clutches of the Druids, and the other from the mercenary greed of the king. But the true enemy is despair: the shame o The continuing adventures of Christopher Sinclair, mechanical engineer turned priest of war. Our hero faces evil on two fronts: a friend turned murderer by the power of magic, and an entire nation of murderous wolf-men. One he has to save from the vengeful clutches of the Druids, and the other from the mercenary greed of the king. But the true enemy is despair: the shame of a man who has done terrible things, and the madness of a man who is doing terrible violence. Can Christopher pick a path through broken and bloody bodies that still leaves room for goodness? From the Trade Paperback edition.

30 review for Judgment at Verdant Court

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I love the premise of M.C. Planck’s ‘World Of Prime’ series. One day, Christopher Sinclair wakes up in an alternate universe where technology is limited by a strict code of feudalism and the rules of magic, religion and time. I can’t elaborate further on that last point without spoiling the second book of the series. Sorry. An engineer by trade, Christopher seems perfectly suited to drag this oddly backward society into a full-fledged industrial revolution and he tries. Much to the annoyance of t I love the premise of M.C. Planck’s ‘World Of Prime’ series. One day, Christopher Sinclair wakes up in an alternate universe where technology is limited by a strict code of feudalism and the rules of magic, religion and time. I can’t elaborate further on that last point without spoiling the second book of the series. Sorry. An engineer by trade, Christopher seems perfectly suited to drag this oddly backward society into a full-fledged industrial revolution and he tries. Much to the annoyance of the nobility, whose rank depends entirely upon magical hierarchy, he is succeeding. Progress is slow, however, and hampered by politics, betrayal and roving bands of wolf men. We’re now up to the third book in the series, Judgment at Verdant Court, and the stakes are getting higher. Fresh from betrayal on two fronts, Christopher’s confidence is understandably shaken. He is faced with the worst of choices which basically come down to: damned if you do, damned if you don’t. This has been a theme throughout the series and one Planck presents well through the eyes and soul of the very conflicted Christopher. He wants to do good and be good. Christopher is essentially a good man. His present incarnation as a white priest of the Bright Lady proclaims so, quite loudly. Unfortunately, he’s also the sword of Marcius and, in this backward world, often the only way to good is through less than judicious use of this sword. Armed with this conflict, Christopher now faces enmity on two fronts: the Gold Throne and the Verdant Court. The first must be put aside in favour of the second for two reasons. Christopher hasn’t achieved a high enough rank to take on the Gold Throne and because he’s a good man. Saving a friend must take priority. So Christopher confronts the druids of the Verdant Court and bargains hard. This is where we see a lot of character growth for our priestly engineer. Up to this point, Christopher has come across as terribly naïve, particularly in relation to anything political. He’s an engineer. His mind moves in different directions. His dealings with the Verdant Court aren’t masterful by any measure, but they show he’s learning. He’s also relying less on his advisors, much to the annoyance of a new companion. I’d love to tell you who this companion is. You’ll find out in the first chapter of the book and will thank me for the surprise. After dealing with the Court, it’s back to the swamp and the relentless bands of wolf men or ulvenmen. This is where the novel gets even more interesting. We have to get through the swamp first, though. As I followed Christopher’s adventures through the swamp and back again, I wondered if the story had become as mired as Christopher’s army. There’s a lot of marching, fort-building and killing. In between, we get a few more moral lessons and some subtle shuffling of position within the camp. Here (and earlier) there are some nice parallels between the relationships of Christopher’s companions and his internal struggle to embody the archetype everyone has built around him. Then the good stuff happens. The secret of the ulvenmen begins to unravel, the speed of revelation keeping pace with Christopher’s mastery of new spells. Finally, Christopher has what he needs to face off against the Gold Throne. He’s still short of power and resources, but he’s been scrambling after those since he woke up in this strange world. It’s when Christopher is offered an extraordinary hand up that the story gets super interesting, however, and then it ends. Just like that. Generally, I’m displeased by loose ends that leave the reader dangling for a year or more while we wait for the next book in the series. ‘Judgment At Verdant Court’ does deliver a complete story, however, and once you think about it for a minute, the ending isn’t entirely unexpected. This had to happen sooner or later and now that it’s out of the way, the stage is set for the final act. Though sometimes slow and muddy, overall, ‘Judgement At Verdant Court’ is an enjoyable read. My hopes for the next and possibly final book include the introduction of more technology to the World of Prime. We didn’t see much in the way of industry this time around, though the theme of technology versus magic is kept alive through debate. I’d also like to see Christopher fail a little more spectacularly. It’s not a cruel wish. He’s come so far, but his main stumbles so far have been made through ignorance. With every book pitting his need to do good against the necessity to do bad, I’d like to see the ultimate test. Learn what this man is really made of. Finally, I’d like an answer to the mystery at the core of this series: how Christopher really got to the World of Prime and what that means. 3.5 (Upon reflection - which often happens as I'm writing a review - I'm rounding my 3.5 up to 4) Reviewed for SFCrowsnest.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

    First, gratitude to the Publisher and to the folks at Best Fantasy Books for sending this one my way. I read the first three books in the World of Prime series: Sword of the Bright Lady, Gold Throne in Shadow, and then Judgement at Verdant Court and being able to progress seamlessly was thoroughly appreciated and made for a more fulfilling and entertaining read. If anyone is interested, Id’ recommend reading them this way than standalones with time apart. Christopher is, in short, a one-man revol First, gratitude to the Publisher and to the folks at Best Fantasy Books for sending this one my way. I read the first three books in the World of Prime series: Sword of the Bright Lady, Gold Throne in Shadow, and then Judgement at Verdant Court and being able to progress seamlessly was thoroughly appreciated and made for a more fulfilling and entertaining read. If anyone is interested, Id’ recommend reading them this way than standalones with time apart. Christopher is, in short, a one-man revolution. He’s a modern American man, early middle-age, suddenly awakened in a fantasy world with medieval technology. The great masses of commonfolk look to powerful lords to keep them safe from the depredations of fantastic beasts and dark sorcery, as well as each other. The magic that imbues and sustains the preternatural abilities of these lords and cardinals and knights of the world of prime is tael, and can only be collected from vanquished foes, usually by boiling the head (as tael resides within the brain). So, our budding revolutionary awakes, intervenes chivalrously to protect a peasant girl from the lusty advances of an entitled and belligerent local lordling, and in doing so, comically embarks upon a mission to uproot the foundations of Prime’s very society. Aided by a sombre and heroically humble military veteran, Karl, and a slew of other memorable allies, Christopher sets out to gather Tael, to protect the innocent, and to tear down the elites of Prime through modern technology. Drawing on his engineering prowess (from his life back home), Christopher builds an army of nobodies that become dauntless riflemen; mills, machinery, mass production and economies of scale all become cornerstones that enrich the lives (and fill the pockets) of Christopher’s growing empire as he and his army push at the frontiers of Prime. These stalwart allies are quite admirable, especially in their initial enthusiasm to basically go off and die as is the fate of every generation. Their belief in Christopher’s abilities seconded only by their proud but misunderstood awe of his ‘virtue’ as he spurns several would-be sexual conquests, pining for his wife back in his ‘reality’. All the poor bugger wants to do is get home; to do it, he’ll need enough rank/power to open a gateway back. It’s actually quite a good read, straight-forward and descriptive without being laborious or grandiloquent, and is, for the most part, an enjoyable and entertaining adventure. There’s little doubt that Christopher is something of a ‘chosen one’ in his mission, though amusingly by sheer happenstance. The framework is very reminiscent of an RPG; there are knights and druids, lords and barons, wizards, cardinals, and minstrels. Each caste/discipline has a respective church or other governing body that facilitates and guards their respective secrets and operational knowledge, as well as a colour-based system of morality. Blue for those who hold the law as penultimate, green for honour/prestige, yellow for personal aggrandisement and selfish gain, white for purity and benevolence, red for aggression and wanton bloodshed, and black for the most nefarious of deeds and wilful evil. Hardly original, but it’s utilised consistently and helps to underpin the motivations of certain characters. Where it becomes more appealing is when there is discernible conflict between a character’s actions and their supposed moral affiliation/shading; though in the three books I’ve only encountered it a few times. Suffice to say, there’s political and personal conniving by almost every character except Christopher who remains quite blunt, and perhaps a little foolhardy, in how he approaches political convocations with peers, potential foes, and neutral parties. Brilliant engineering and technical aptitude, but lacking some common sense or social etiquette and tact. It can be endearing at times, and frustrating at others when seemingly every other character ‘gets it’, while Christopher bum-rushes and bumbles his way through these scenes. Thankfully, his dedication to his wife and his soldiers proves more than a satisfying counterbalance. Christopher’s character is genuinely empathetic to the common man, though his altruism comes across too saccharine at times when extolling the mighty egalitarian wonders of modern American society – a bit of a slap in the face and comes across as either too idealistic and naïve in the character, or the author’s less than subtle agitprop. It bothered me somewhat, but in light of the political efforts of individuals like Lincoln, Roosevelt, and Jefferson perhaps such patriotic sentiments are valid and appropriate. Other than this, Christopher proves to be an adequate leader and figurehead, leading from the front in battles that nearly kill him on multiple occasions, displaying considerable humility and recognition for the talents of his subordinates, if a little too trusting or forgiving of the greedy or seemingly sinister machinations and scheming of some of his more colourful or key personnel. The philandering mill guy comes to mind as an especially dislikeable jackarse, and Fey, the Alchemist, is, well, a cold, haughty bitch. There’s plenty of likeable characters, mind, and Christopher’s small group soon swells into a large army replete with heroes of their own renown. It is this veritable cast of thousands that help sell the narrative; each is detailed and nuanced with enough differences to make them stand out as separate individuals, and while there are some die-hard trope runners plying their wares here, there are also some disarmingly refreshing facets to the characterisation. Action scenes come in two flavours, minor skirmishes/duels, or massive set-pieces. And both are handled well, the latter in particular are great reading and these stood as the strongest aspects of the books for me. Grand adventures lead to an unsupported defence against a tide of goblin-esque marauders, where the only hero seemingly capable of winning the day is a Lord who orders a retreat, only to be upstaged by Christopher’s fledgling rifle battalion. Many of the common folk and soldiers end up dead in these books, but the miraculous skills of a Cardinal of the White who befriends Christopher ensures most can be resurrected, calling the spirit back and restoring the body as long as even a small piece remains, such as a bone or a thumb or some such. In that sense mortality isn’t really a worry for Christopher or his men; yes, there’s an associated cost in gold for the Cardinal’s efforts, and a somewhat restrictive time period for post-mortality triage and subsequent resurrection but it’s hardly disconcerting. As the series progresses with seemingly higher stakes and vastly more powerful foes, the sense of real danger, of permanent death, doesn’t hover as it did in the first battles of the first book, and I felt the risk of danger and death, while more pronounced, was far less likely to happen. Christopher and his swelling ranks, heroes and all, essentially are levelling up through tough odds, but they always seem to come out unscathed excepting one or two acceptable losses of a minor character. Everyone key to Christopher’s enterprise is, like Christopher, ultimately less and less likely to be killed off, despite a few close calls, and after a while I was acutely disappointed at the lessened potential for tragedy to befall the army. Knowing that real, permanent death could still occur helped flavour the sense of emotional investment and excitement as the larger battle sequences loomed, and eventually I came to care far less for the mighty heroes and Christopher, and more for the common footsloggers and the poor bastards who would get churned through the melee meat-grinder. That said, it may be the author’s intent to elicit this sense of peasant-soldier solidarity, all the more to root for Christopher’s efforts to upset the power balance and effect a more favourable and equitable distribution of resources and abilities across Prime. The landscapes are common enough; a sort of Scandinavian peasant countryside in winter, castle-towns and isolated bastions, druids in the woods, steaming swampy jungles, etc. Still plenty of fun to go wandering along with Christopher and his increasingly skilled and seasoned soldiers through. The world-building is sufficient for the tale, and that which is featured is relatively conventional (castles, cults, beasts, booze, warlords, wenches, necromancers, bad guys, etc - all familiar enough to anyone who’s read Fantasy once or twice in their time) and doesn’t hold many surprises. Conflicting loyalties, internecine and external politics on a micro and macro scale between factions - it’s all here, and can make for a little tedium depending on whether you like the characters or factions Christopher is engaging with. The sense of history (or lack thereof) for Prime gets explained and makes considerable sense, where the scale is a little ambiguous at times. Prime can’t be circumnavigated without a decent horse of two, and as yet I don’t recall much mention of the sea/ocean; fairly landlocked are the regions where Christopher’s adventure to date has occurred. Eventually Christopher and his crew find that, indeed, here be monsters, which isn’t as straight-forward as they initially assume. Much of the novels feels game-like, gathering resources and experience, curb-stomping or barely surviving a battle, only to level-up accordingly thereafter; unsurprisingly I discovered after reading that MC Planck has created an RPG with rules and such that correspond to the rank/cast/morality systems of the book… horse and cart/chicken and egg thing here, from what I read. That’s not to say such elements detract from the novel, rather they provide a semblance of verisimilitude and an overarching framework that ensures consistency. It’s all too easy to deus ex machina in some magic dragon sword and such, but thankfully Christopher and his allies suffer many setbacks and obstacles due to their various limitations and lack of rank/tael. Money talks, yo’, and Tael is it in the world of Prime. Gold too, but the former is rather more commanding of everyone’s attention and desire to obtain. Intriguingly, Christopher himself has noted the unquestioning avarice even he has begun to develop toward obtaining tael and the ranks it can bestow; so I’m curious to see how this plays out in the later novels. There’s also a looming, pseudo-Lovecraftian malevolence that has only been hinted at or discussed in hushed tones; it seems Christopher’s true mission from the War God Marcius (who makes Christopher his priest in the beginning of the first book) is to propagate massive changes across Prime, not just for the hell of it, but to ensure a more balanced civilisation capable of withstanding the eventual cataclysmic voraciousness of the dastardly squiddies (or the Hjerne-Spica, as they’re titled) when they finally rock up. Curious to see how the author explores this in the next book as it’s only been a small, but horrifying, revelation for Christopher. All in all, fairly strong characterisation and balance, decent plotting and pacing of the narrative, great action scenes, mostly likeable characters, one or two convenient escapes and near-misses but nothing unforgivable; MC Planck’s World of Prime series is one I would recommend, particularly for fans of Gunpowder fantasy, Warhammer novels, or RPGs. Sword of the Bright Lady 4/5 Gold Throne in Shadow 3/5 Judgement at Verdant Court 4/5

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Judgment at Verdant Court is book three in the World of Prime series, which I highly recommend reading in order. The first book is Sword of the Bright Lady, and the general hook is that a man from our world is dropped into a fantasy world that strongly resembles a fantasy RPG. If that sounds like your brand of nerdiness, I’d suggest checking the first book out. Forewarning, the rest of this review may contain spoilers for the first two books. Christopher has now discovered that there’s a threat l Judgment at Verdant Court is book three in the World of Prime series, which I highly recommend reading in order. The first book is Sword of the Bright Lady, and the general hook is that a man from our world is dropped into a fantasy world that strongly resembles a fantasy RPG. If that sounds like your brand of nerdiness, I’d suggest checking the first book out. Forewarning, the rest of this review may contain spoilers for the first two books. Christopher has now discovered that there’s a threat lurking in this world, worse than anything he’s yet encountered. The harvesting may be neigh, and his fledgling industrial revolution is more important than ever. Plus, he’s still got to deal with the monsters in the swamp, arrogant nobility, and political situations which he is totally unprepared for. In my review of Gold Throne in Shadow, I complained about how the book was straight forwardly using the “race of evil” trope in regards to the wolf-men creatures which live in the wilderness. I’m happy to report that Judgment at Court Verdant adds some moral ambiguity to this situation! This is the greatest improvement I’ve seen in the series, and I’m really pleased with this plot twist. I’ll leave the details for the reader to discover, but this is my favorite development of the series. I’m still lukewarm on characterization. Christopher is just too much of an every man character for me, and the secondary characters come off as mostly one note, although I think Karl and Lalania have potential. I’m still wary about how Fey’s being handled. I’m glad that the last book pointed out that what she did was rape, but I wish she faced more consequences. I was wondering if this series was going to be a trilogy or would contain more books. After the ending of Judgment at Court Verdant, I certainly hope there’s more books! Still, the ending felt more like an “End of Act I” than an outright cliffhanger, so I’m thankful for that. While this series isn’t without its flaws, I’ve generally found it be pretty solidly entertaining. I would recommend it to anyone interested in the idea of a fantasy world based off of RPG mechanics. Originally posted on The Illustrated Page. Disclaimer: I received a free copy from Pyr in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. I enjoyed this book. It is fast-moving and action packed. It is loaded with magic and fantasy. The characterization is well done. In particular, Christopher is a really interesting protagonist. He is technically adept with good motives but lacking in social skills and common sense. There is a nice set up for the next book in the series. If medieval fantasy interests you, then you will enjoy this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Clay Kallam

    It’s time for another rant, I’m afraid and though M.C. Planck’s “Judgment at Verdant Court” (Pyr, $17, 341 pages) is really a pretty good book, it just happens to be the one I read that pushed me over the edge. Note to authors: Readers do not remember every golden word you have ever written. What you said on page 132 of book one will not automatically spring to mind to a reader who is now in the middle of book three 18 months later. You have an obligation to explain to your reading audience what It’s time for another rant, I’m afraid and though M.C. Planck’s “Judgment at Verdant Court” (Pyr, $17, 341 pages) is really a pretty good book, it just happens to be the one I read that pushed me over the edge. Note to authors: Readers do not remember every golden word you have ever written. What you said on page 132 of book one will not automatically spring to mind to a reader who is now in the middle of book three 18 months later. You have an obligation to explain to your reading audience what is going on. Let’s just start with characters. In “Judgment at Verdant Court,” protagonist Christopher Sinclair is pretty memorable. He landed on this world through unknown means and as a man of our time, it’s easy to identify with him. Naturally, there one or two other characters that stick out, but really I do not remember the details of Ser Gregor’s life, nor exactly what powers Saints have, nor how many gods there are, or vicars, or priests. I don’t recall the ranking system, and I’m unsure of the exact relationship of the King to Saints. And then there are these horrible beings called the hjerne-spica that a brief reference was made to somewhere in volume two, along with some kind of explanation about the founding of this world. But I don’t remember much of it, because it was a long time ago and I’ve probably read 20 books since then – so help me out here, would you? So much as I enjoyed “Judgment at Verdant Court,” it was very frustrating to simply not know what was going on, especially since it would’ve been so easy for M.C. Planck to have explained it. I know authors hate writing synopses, but would a list of characters be asking too much? How about explaining the system of ranks? (On this world, if you consume enough of a certain magical substance, you gain rank – the more rank you have, the more powers you have. Simple enough, but I confess I don’t remember the details that were explained early on in the series, and a reminder would have made this book much more enjoyable.) Then again, maybe it isn’t the author’s fault. What it seems like is that these three books, and other series, are actually one large book that is cut up into parts by the publisher to maximize revenue. Fine, I understand, but how about giving the reader -- you know, the one that pays your salary -- a little consideration by either inserting more exposition that explains what is happened in the previous books, or actually going with the synopsis, which would start everyone off on roughly the same foot? OK, I think I’m done -- back to “Judgment at Verdant Court.” Planck does a great job of really exploring what it would mean to be an educated 21st century person transported into a medieval world of peasants, barons, and in this case magic. It seems so easy to uphold the values that we hold dear, but as Christopher discovers, it’s not nearly as simple as it seems. He doesn’t really want to be treated as royalty or protected by guards at all time, or have a retinue, but his perceived power protects the people who follow him, and so he must play by the rules of the society he is living in in order to do just that. And Planck does another nice thing as well. This world is as complex as Earth, and thus there are always things Christopher discovers that he doesn’t know, or didn’t understand, or forgot because he was just so overwhelmed with information. All of this means he’s constantly blundering his way through, but at the same time he’s able to introduce scientific concepts from the 21st century (such as rifles) and alter this new world in fundamental ways. After three books, he’s just exploring the surface of the inherent conflicts between our world and the world he finds himself on, and he’s also trying to do right by everyone. I’ve really enjoyed all three of these books, and it looks as though there will be at least two more. I’m totally on board, but I sure wish that M.C. Planck and publishers and other authors would have a little more consideration for their readers. We do have lives outside of your books, and we’re not trying to insult anybody by asking for a little more information about what you wrote before – we just want to get the maximum enjoyment out of the book we’re reading right now.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kes

    We meet the druids in this book (hinted at with D'Kan) as well as (view spoiler)[an elven explorer from another realm, who takes control of the ulvenmen (hide spoiler)] . Christopher accomplishes his mission from the king - who, just as this happens - (view spoiler)[deals with an accusation of treason as the book ends. (hide spoiler)] I liked the humour in this book - such as Lalania suggesting that the men stay on kitchen duty until they learn to cook. Christopher meets (view spoiler)[Cannan agai We meet the druids in this book (hinted at with D'Kan) as well as (view spoiler)[an elven explorer from another realm, who takes control of the ulvenmen (hide spoiler)] . Christopher accomplishes his mission from the king - who, just as this happens - (view spoiler)[deals with an accusation of treason as the book ends. (hide spoiler)] I liked the humour in this book - such as Lalania suggesting that the men stay on kitchen duty until they learn to cook. Christopher meets (view spoiler)[Cannan again, and "saves" him through learning atonement. (hide spoiler)] I also liked Christopher deciding (view spoiler)[not to go home just yet (hide spoiler)] . Each book is short but does a good job at expanding the world. 2.5/5 stars

  7. 4 out of 5

    Isaios

    At some point I just completely lost my patience with forgiveness. So a bunch of magical whores (and I'm not even gonna touch the use of that trope) betray and kidnap you, then threaten to off you because they believe in a magical head-eating space-squid or some such. The reasonable thing is NOT to believe them. It is CERTAINLY not reasonable to forgive them. Murder them in their treacherous, fanatical faces and eat their delicious XP. (I don't care if said space-squid are real or not, offensive At some point I just completely lost my patience with forgiveness. So a bunch of magical whores (and I'm not even gonna touch the use of that trope) betray and kidnap you, then threaten to off you because they believe in a magical head-eating space-squid or some such. The reasonable thing is NOT to believe them. It is CERTAINLY not reasonable to forgive them. Murder them in their treacherous, fanatical faces and eat their delicious XP. (I don't care if said space-squid are real or not, offensive action should be counter-indicated. With murder.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Clinton Sheppard

    Good series. This book was a bit slower out the gate than the previous one but had some good action later on. I'm hoping they decide to copy the design of armor they found and that maybe one of Christopher's advanced powers as he advances through the ranks will have something to do with armor. I'm looking forward to the next book. If you like this series you may also like The Cross-Time Engineer. Good series. This book was a bit slower out the gate than the previous one but had some good action later on. I'm hoping they decide to copy the design of armor they found and that maybe one of Christopher's advanced powers as he advances through the ranks will have something to do with armor. I'm looking forward to the next book. If you like this series you may also like The Cross-Time Engineer.

  9. 4 out of 5

    DaMaar

    Bardic Powers It was a very short read but it packed with excitement. To me, the best part of the book was the unveiling of the Minstrels powers. It was the first time I’ve read about a Bard being so overpowered. Favorite Line: Dashing swordsmen were overrated. Statistics ruled the world, not personality and steel.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Akiva

    Fast and fun. Almost like a light novel. It assumes you know all the tropes and details you've read in hundreds of stories, and focuses on its own fun. Engineer gets transported into a D&D world. A good example of Rational Fiction. Fast and fun. Almost like a light novel. It assumes you know all the tropes and details you've read in hundreds of stories, and focuses on its own fun. Engineer gets transported into a D&D world. A good example of Rational Fiction.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rudi Opperman

    The very intriguing journey of Christopher Sinclair, an modern time engineer, who gets transported to a medieval world with magic, continues. You can’t help but be fascinated by Christopher’s attempts to make this new world a better place.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hope

    This book felt pretty intense as a read and I like that. Usually, I don't enjoy these kinds of books, especially when I haven't read the previous books and just jumped into the one I have because goodreads giveaway reasons. But I liked it... More? This book felt pretty intense as a read and I like that. Usually, I don't enjoy these kinds of books, especially when I haven't read the previous books and just jumped into the one I have because goodreads giveaway reasons. But I liked it... More?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ian Denner

    Excellent What a way to end this book. What a way for Christopher to find out the truth? And in the end he decided that commitment trumps all...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Oh Christopher, what have you done?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Volpot

    4.5 stars. Good sequel. I liked it better than book #2

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Snow

    Still good A little less focused than the previous books in the series, it continues to develop the premise of game-style magic in interesting ways.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gowri

    Though each book completes its apportioned task, at the end you still feel as if you are left at the crossroads

  18. 5 out of 5

    william h payne 111

    Great book. Fast paced. I can't wait until the next book in the series is published. Great action scenes, magic and technology blended just right. Great book. Fast paced. I can't wait until the next book in the series is published. Great action scenes, magic and technology blended just right.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Louis R.

    Heading for the epic conclusion Another great book; Christopher’s power continues to grow but not as fast as his problems. A really fun twist on the trope.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jaye

    Mr. Planck continues to deliver on this top-notch fantasy series. Just when I thought I knew what was going to happen, he pulled the rug out from under me. Good show, sir!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    These books read strangely the ideas are compelling but the execution is flawed pretty much all telling and no showing and yet im driven to read them.... More review later

  22. 5 out of 5

    Skellingtonjr

    Feat series. I have been reading this series since the start and it never fails to entertains and delight. When is he next one?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jace

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rajesh Raman

  25. 4 out of 5

    Applemonkeyman

  26. 4 out of 5

    Arnaud

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Downs

  28. 4 out of 5

    Viens Divi

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kmsxkuse

  30. 4 out of 5

    Monica Plante

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