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The Crash of Piedmont Airlines Flight 22: Completing the Record of the 1967 Midair Collision Near Hendersonville, North Carolina

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Against a backdrop of inadequate funding, misplaced priorities and a lack of manpower, American commercial aviation in the 1960s was in a perilous state. In July 1967, when a Piedmont Airlines Boeing 727 collided with a Cessna 310 over Hendersonville, North Carolina, killing 82 people, the industry was in crisis. Congress called hearings on aviation safety and government a Against a backdrop of inadequate funding, misplaced priorities and a lack of manpower, American commercial aviation in the 1960s was in a perilous state. In July 1967, when a Piedmont Airlines Boeing 727 collided with a Cessna 310 over Hendersonville, North Carolina, killing 82 people, the industry was in crisis. Congress called hearings on aviation safety and government and union officials pressured President Lyndon Johnson to request increased funding for aviation safety. But the National Transportation Safety Board's probe into the crash was flawed from the start. The investigative team was made up of individuals whose companies had certain interests in the outcome. The lead investigator was the brother of the vice president of Piedmont Airlines. In an effort to shift blame from the government and Piedmont, critical conversations recorded on tape never made it into the NTSB's report. Maintenance and training records, as well as industry warnings of the 727's operational limitations, were also omitted. This book reveals the true story of the investigation: what was left out and why.


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Against a backdrop of inadequate funding, misplaced priorities and a lack of manpower, American commercial aviation in the 1960s was in a perilous state. In July 1967, when a Piedmont Airlines Boeing 727 collided with a Cessna 310 over Hendersonville, North Carolina, killing 82 people, the industry was in crisis. Congress called hearings on aviation safety and government a Against a backdrop of inadequate funding, misplaced priorities and a lack of manpower, American commercial aviation in the 1960s was in a perilous state. In July 1967, when a Piedmont Airlines Boeing 727 collided with a Cessna 310 over Hendersonville, North Carolina, killing 82 people, the industry was in crisis. Congress called hearings on aviation safety and government and union officials pressured President Lyndon Johnson to request increased funding for aviation safety. But the National Transportation Safety Board's probe into the crash was flawed from the start. The investigative team was made up of individuals whose companies had certain interests in the outcome. The lead investigator was the brother of the vice president of Piedmont Airlines. In an effort to shift blame from the government and Piedmont, critical conversations recorded on tape never made it into the NTSB's report. Maintenance and training records, as well as industry warnings of the 727's operational limitations, were also omitted. This book reveals the true story of the investigation: what was left out and why.

18 review for The Crash of Piedmont Airlines Flight 22: Completing the Record of the 1967 Midair Collision Near Hendersonville, North Carolina

  1. 5 out of 5

    Zachary

    Air crashes terrify many fliers, but remarkably few stick in public consciousness, typically fading away quickly. This was particularly true in the 1967 case of Piedmont Airlines Flight 22, which collided with a Cessna in Hendersonville, NC. The investigation of a crash that owed its occurrence to flawed industry practices was swept aside by political events and the Vietnam War. The author writes with an informative, matter-of-fact style, with no sense of embellishment or melodrama, only an impar Air crashes terrify many fliers, but remarkably few stick in public consciousness, typically fading away quickly. This was particularly true in the 1967 case of Piedmont Airlines Flight 22, which collided with a Cessna in Hendersonville, NC. The investigation of a crash that owed its occurrence to flawed industry practices was swept aside by political events and the Vietnam War. The author writes with an informative, matter-of-fact style, with no sense of embellishment or melodrama, only an imparting of the facts. Details and background abound, adding flavor and interesting tidbits to the narrative. Impressively, the author largely avoids the ‘fourth-wall-knowledge-of-impending-doom’ trope that true-disaster books tend towards. This book is highly recommended to fans of the popular television show Air Crash Investigation, as the author draws from the same well of informative, analytical presentation (in fact, I found myself reading it in that smooth British accent). Well-researched and grippingly-written, any aviation enthusiast regardless of profession will find enjoyment in this immersive history.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Fascinating read for those interested in aviation disasters. In many ways, the accident the book is about is very similar to the much more well known PSA Flight 182 disaster in San Diego in 1978. (This similarity does not escape the author.) The same kinds of minor errors combined, resulting in two airplanes trying to occupy the same space at the same time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Steve Skelton

  4. 4 out of 5

    Douglas OKeeffe

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sallie Taylor

  6. 4 out of 5

    kenny

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brent

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tonja Tollison

  9. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Leckrone

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rob Springall

  12. 5 out of 5

    Monisa

  13. 4 out of 5

    Thomas King

  14. 5 out of 5

    Destiny Sadoski

  15. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis J. Barnes

  16. 4 out of 5

    scott p edwards

  17. 4 out of 5

    Robert E. Byrd, Jr.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sue E Tindel

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