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When Computers Went to Sea: The Digitization of the United States Navy

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When Computers Went to Sea explores the history of the United States Navy's secret development of code-breaking computers and their adaptation to solve a critical fleet radar data handling problem in the Navy's first seaborne digital computer system - that went to sea in 1962. This is the only book written on the United States Navy's initial application of shipboard digita When Computers Went to Sea explores the history of the United States Navy's secret development of code-breaking computers and their adaptation to solve a critical fleet radar data handling problem in the Navy's first seaborne digital computer system - that went to sea in 1962. This is the only book written on the United States Navy's initial application of shipboard digital computers to naval warfare. Considered one of the most successful projects ever undertaken by the US Navy, the Naval Tactical Data System (NTDS) was the subject of numerous studies attempting to pinpoint the reason for the systems inordinate success in the face of seemingly impossible technical challenges and stiff resistance from some in the military. The system's success precipitated a digital revolution in naval warfare systems. Dave Boslaugh details the innovations developed by the NTDS project managers including: project management techniques, modular digital hardware for ship systems, top-down modular computer programming techniques, innovative computer program documentation, and other novel real-time computer system concepts. Automated military systems users and developers, real-time process control systems designers, automated system project managers, and digital technology history students will find this account of a United States military organization's initial foray into computerization interesting and thought provoking.


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When Computers Went to Sea explores the history of the United States Navy's secret development of code-breaking computers and their adaptation to solve a critical fleet radar data handling problem in the Navy's first seaborne digital computer system - that went to sea in 1962. This is the only book written on the United States Navy's initial application of shipboard digita When Computers Went to Sea explores the history of the United States Navy's secret development of code-breaking computers and their adaptation to solve a critical fleet radar data handling problem in the Navy's first seaborne digital computer system - that went to sea in 1962. This is the only book written on the United States Navy's initial application of shipboard digital computers to naval warfare. Considered one of the most successful projects ever undertaken by the US Navy, the Naval Tactical Data System (NTDS) was the subject of numerous studies attempting to pinpoint the reason for the systems inordinate success in the face of seemingly impossible technical challenges and stiff resistance from some in the military. The system's success precipitated a digital revolution in naval warfare systems. Dave Boslaugh details the innovations developed by the NTDS project managers including: project management techniques, modular digital hardware for ship systems, top-down modular computer programming techniques, innovative computer program documentation, and other novel real-time computer system concepts. Automated military systems users and developers, real-time process control systems designers, automated system project managers, and digital technology history students will find this account of a United States military organization's initial foray into computerization interesting and thought provoking.

25 review for When Computers Went to Sea: The Digitization of the United States Navy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ari

    Seems sort of rambly and digressive -- author wants to document the experiences and careers of his mentors in the navy. This is actually sort of fun -- you get a sense what sort of people were doing project management for the navy in the 50s and 60s. But this includes a lot of invaluable material about the early history of radar, with yummy gooey technical details, so I can't complain. The material on the hardware is excellent, and the discussion of project management techniques was also interest Seems sort of rambly and digressive -- author wants to document the experiences and careers of his mentors in the navy. This is actually sort of fun -- you get a sense what sort of people were doing project management for the navy in the 50s and 60s. But this includes a lot of invaluable material about the early history of radar, with yummy gooey technical details, so I can't complain. The material on the hardware is excellent, and the discussion of project management techniques was also interesting. I wish there were a bit more about the software side, though. UC Berkeley Engineering library has a copy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    How could you not like this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Robert Fess

  4. 4 out of 5

    Xavier Edwards

  5. 4 out of 5

    Charles Dawson

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cobrachen

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

  8. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Hardy

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris1

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Shapiro

  11. 4 out of 5

    Donmbrown

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tanya.irizarry

  13. 5 out of 5

    Whatwhenwhere

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rick Lazier

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  16. 4 out of 5

    Josh Kvavle

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christina

  20. 4 out of 5

    J V

  21. 4 out of 5

    Al Crain

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cody

  23. 5 out of 5

    Car Bauer

  24. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

  25. 5 out of 5

    Markus Salmijärvi

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