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The Jungle Book and Other Classics

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Adventure abounds in The Jungle Book and Other Classics, a collection of three of Rudyard Kipling's most popular books. In the stories gathered here, wild animals speak with the wisdom and insight of humankind, and young boys learn to master the skills they need to become men in their society. Books included: The Jungle Book; The Second Jungle Book; Kim Adventure abounds in The Jungle Book and Other Classics, a collection of three of Rudyard Kipling's most popular books. In the stories gathered here, wild animals speak with the wisdom and insight of humankind, and young boys learn to master the skills they need to become men in their society. Books included: The Jungle Book; The Second Jungle Book; Kim


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Adventure abounds in The Jungle Book and Other Classics, a collection of three of Rudyard Kipling's most popular books. In the stories gathered here, wild animals speak with the wisdom and insight of humankind, and young boys learn to master the skills they need to become men in their society. Books included: The Jungle Book; The Second Jungle Book; Kim Adventure abounds in The Jungle Book and Other Classics, a collection of three of Rudyard Kipling's most popular books. In the stories gathered here, wild animals speak with the wisdom and insight of humankind, and young boys learn to master the skills they need to become men in their society. Books included: The Jungle Book; The Second Jungle Book; Kim

30 review for The Jungle Book and Other Classics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    Disney really did a makeover with this one. Review to come. YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Snapchat @miranda_reads Disney really did a makeover with this one. Review to come. YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Snapchat @miranda_reads

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erika L. Miller

    Sometimes we have to get back to basics – or classics, rather. Every year Barnes & Noble has a members’ sale where a person can grab a basketful of books for a discount price. One day I managed to grab The Jungle Book and Other Classics by Rudyard Kipling. I’m sure some – possibly a small few, not sure who is reading these – but will probably gasp and say, ‘But Kei! You’re black and Rudyard Kipling was racist!’ I’ve not read Kipling’s work that cemented his racism, The White Man’s Burden but I’v Sometimes we have to get back to basics – or classics, rather. Every year Barnes & Noble has a members’ sale where a person can grab a basketful of books for a discount price. One day I managed to grab The Jungle Book and Other Classics by Rudyard Kipling. I’m sure some – possibly a small few, not sure who is reading these – but will probably gasp and say, ‘But Kei! You’re black and Rudyard Kipling was racist!’ I’ve not read Kipling’s work that cemented his racism, The White Man’s Burden but I’ve heard about it but being a child of the 80s I grew up seeing the animated shorts of The White Seal and Rikki Tikki-Tavi which were part of the Chuck Jones collection. And it is the same Chuck Jones you’re thinking of…or maybe not?? But Chuck Jones has been the animation director of most, if not all of the Looney Toons cartoons. It’s why the animation style probably looks so familiar if you’re a fan of the old style. The copy I purchased was broken down into three separate parts: The Jungle Book, The Second Book and Kim. Much like a good portion of children I grew up watching and singing along with Disney’s The Jungle Book where Mowgli happens upon the lazy and wise-cracking Baloo the Bear, has to be rescued from King Louie, an orangutan and proclaimed leader of the monkeys and wants to be like Man and rule the jungle, the smooth and seductive Kaa and the cool, calm and blood thirsty tiger, Shere Khan. Of topic, anyone else ever wonder how come Bagheera never made it into the Tailspin series? No? Just me? Alright. The story of Mowgli is broken into two parts and there are some parts of the original storyline from Kipling that Disney followed in the live action movie. But the main differences are in the characters traits and roles in the story. Baloo is a teacher to the wolf cubs and Mowgli winds up under his tutelage. Due to Mowgli’s slow growth rate in comparison to his pack brothers and sisters, Baloo must teach Mowgli so much more to ensure his survival in the jungle. Bagheera is another guardian but he actually paid for Mowgli to remain with the wolf pack because wolfy brows were raised when Mowgli first appeared as a toddler before the pack as a whole. Shere Khan isn’t as regal as he’s been portrayed in media, he’s actually born with a limp which leads him to prey upon Man because they are easier prey. And another thing, King Louie doesn’t exist. He was completely made up by Disney and based upon Louis Armstrong which is why he has a jazz style about him in the full-length animated motion picture. Mowgli’s relationship with the animals of the forest is one of respect that is developed as he learns how to communicate with them; the exception being Shere Khan for obvious reasons because he wants to eat our hero and the monkeys because they are deemed unworthy and troublesome by the rest of the jungle because of their erratic behavior and unwarranted teasing. Things still don’t work out for Mowgli as he gets order and Shere Khan takes over the pack but through his own strength and bond with his friends and brothers, the wolf pack, he’s able to overcome the challenges and proving himself a person of respect in the jungle. The second half picks up with an older Mowgli which Disney did do a live action version in 1994 starring Jason Scott Lee. Hey…at least he’s…Asian…??? But he played an older Mowgli and happened upon a white cobra in an abandoned temple. I don’t recall much else about the movie but Mowgli does eventually find the balance he has been seeking settling down, getting married, having a man cub of his own and still running with his pack brothers. Other stories included The White Seal which is the story of Kotick, a white seal, who decides to save his kind from the seal hunters by finding them a new home. I’ve always thought Happy Feet received its inspiration from this classic. There was also the story of Rikki Tikki-Tavi, the story of a mongoose who defends his new home and family from two cobras that have been terrorizing a garden. There are other stories that aren’t animal centric such as Quiquern which is the story of a young Inuit and his journey to find food to help his village survive. It’s a harrowing story of a young boy facing off against nature, starvation all for the greater good. There’s also the story of Toomai of the Elephants, a young boy who travels with his father and their elephant, Kala Nag, taking on jobs for the British-Indian government. Toomai finds himself caught up in a nocturnal dance of the elephants affording him prestige among his family and peers but also has an eerily beautiful story of nature and animal instincts. Those stories I was familiar with in some capacity or other but one that was wholly new to me was Kim. Kim is the story of a white boy, one of only two that had a white male as the main character, who has grown up in India all his life and finds himself an orphan. Kim is resourceful, warm and witty. Through his skills he recognized as a potential spy. Kim finds himself caught up in a ‘Great Game’ played out by a number of people, one being a dear friend, Mahbub Ali. Kim has been told of a prophecy about finding his place, recognition and wealth in a Red Bull. It is a wonderful story, the longest second only to the story of Mowgli, but there are a variety of characters from a Chinese lama, who Kim loves and adores and lama back as if grandson and grandfather. Kim is taught skills of profiling and disguise that aids an ally later on. Overall, it is a great story and something I wish I had read earlier on as it follows Kim from the age of 13 to 17 where you go on wonderful adventures with him, chuckle at banter thrown back and forth between him and others, and feel a moment of worry and chill when the lama is attacked by a self-entitled Russian. The stories are fairly short and even made some good bedtime stories for my niece by just reading one chapter a night – although I kept reading without her, she’s only two. I’m looking forward to reading more of his works. So despite Kipling’s stances he is still a great writer and as Neil Gaiman said, “It would be a poor sort of world if one were only able to read authors who expressed points of view that one agreed with entirely. It would be a bland sort of world if we could not spend time with people who thought differently and who saw the world from a different place. Kipling was many things that I am not, and I like that in my authors.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim Short

    I enjoyed reading all the short stories: finding out where the scenes for all the Mowgli stories originated and what was changed to make the movies. His other short stories were equally enjoyable but so far removed from the jungles of India (being mostly set in the Arctic) as to make me curious about Kipling's interests. While I enjoyed the novel portion (Kim), the ending seemed to simply stop in mid-story without providing any completion/ending; otherwise it was good. I enjoyed reading all the short stories: finding out where the scenes for all the Mowgli stories originated and what was changed to make the movies. His other short stories were equally enjoyable but so far removed from the jungles of India (being mostly set in the Arctic) as to make me curious about Kipling's interests. While I enjoyed the novel portion (Kim), the ending seemed to simply stop in mid-story without providing any completion/ending; otherwise it was good.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dan Logue

    Jungle book alone would be a 5* review but the other stories, whilst still good, bring this down.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Vivek Nair

    The Jungle Book and Other Classics By Rudyard Kipling __________________________________________ A book that was written more than 120 years back, still fascinating readers all around the world - well that's what Rudyard Kipling did through his book The Jungle Book. The huge success of Disney's version of The Jungle Book which was released in 2016 shows how captivating it is even for the younger generation. The Jungle Book and Other Classics, is essentially a collection of Kipling's three major works The Jungle Book and Other Classics By Rudyard Kipling __________________________________________ A book that was written more than 120 years back, still fascinating readers all around the world - well that's what Rudyard Kipling did through his book The Jungle Book. The huge success of Disney's version of The Jungle Book which was released in 2016 shows how captivating it is even for the younger generation. The Jungle Book and Other Classics, is essentially a collection of Kipling's three major works - The Jungle Book, The Second Jungle Book and Kim. The Jungle Book and The Second Jungle Book not just features the tales of Mowgli, but also includes stories of other animal characters like the brave mongoose, the white seal etc. All of the stories personify animals and the relationship between these animals and Mowgli, the complexities of the wild, the rules of the jungle is brilliantly written. Kim, on the other hand, is the tale of Kimball O'Hara, a vagabond and his adventures. I enjoyed this one thoroughly and I must admit that it took me back to my childhood where I used to watch the adventures of Mowgli in Doordarshan.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    # NC Own in hardback. FS: "It was seven o'clock of a very warm evening in the Seeonee Hills when Father Wolf woke up from his day's rest, scratched himself, yawned, and spread out his paws one after the other to get rid of the sleepy feelings in the tips." LS: "He crossed his hands on his lap and smiled, as a man may who has won Salvation for himself and his beloved." # NC Own in hardback. FS: "It was seven o'clock of a very warm evening in the Seeonee Hills when Father Wolf woke up from his day's rest, scratched himself, yawned, and spread out his paws one after the other to get rid of the sleepy feelings in the tips." LS: "He crossed his hands on his lap and smiled, as a man may who has won Salvation for himself and his beloved."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Trishten

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kali Ann

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Moore

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Seng

  11. 5 out of 5

    Héber Ribeiro

  12. 5 out of 5

    Torendana

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan W. Lounsberry

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mel

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dan Shamanbear

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan D Meggyesy

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amie Adrian

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sam Cook

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Marshall

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Long

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kiley

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bipul

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gitai Ben-ammi

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matthe

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Branch

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  29. 5 out of 5

    Irene

  30. 4 out of 5

    Myrna Urbina

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