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The conclusion of creative team Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo's #1 New York Times best-selling run! The people of Gotham all know who truly runs their city: Gotham is Batman. The fate of their home is time and time again tied to that of the Dark Knight, who would do anything to protect it. After months of living an ordinary civilian life while other heroes stood in for him The conclusion of creative team Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo's #1 New York Times best-selling run! The people of Gotham all know who truly runs their city: Gotham is Batman. The fate of their home is time and time again tied to that of the Dark Knight, who would do anything to protect it. After months of living an ordinary civilian life while other heroes stood in for him, Bruce Wayne has finally returned to his rightful role as Gotham’s vigilante protector. As a grateful city welcomes back its savior, both Batman and the people he protects consider the legacy he has created. What would Gotham be without its hero? Could it survive? And furthermore, what would Bruce Wayne be without the Batman? As acclaimed writer Scott Snyder draws the final curtain on his game-changing Batman series, the newly returned Dark Knight battles familiar foes and new enemies. These exquisite standalone stories take the Dark Knight into an alternate dystopian future, as well as deep into his own past, questioning who he is, how he came to be and what his legacy must be… Legendary Batman writer Scott Snyder (Batman, All-Star Batman, American Vampire) and James Tynion IV (Batman Eternal) are joined by artists Greg Capullo (Spawn), Roge Antonio (Batman and Robin Eternal), ACO (Midnighter) and Riley Rossmo (Constantine: The Hellblazer) in Batman Volume 10: Epilogue. This final volume collects Batman #51-52, Batman: Futures End #1, Batman Annual #4 and Batman: Rebirth #1.


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The conclusion of creative team Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo's #1 New York Times best-selling run! The people of Gotham all know who truly runs their city: Gotham is Batman. The fate of their home is time and time again tied to that of the Dark Knight, who would do anything to protect it. After months of living an ordinary civilian life while other heroes stood in for him The conclusion of creative team Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo's #1 New York Times best-selling run! The people of Gotham all know who truly runs their city: Gotham is Batman. The fate of their home is time and time again tied to that of the Dark Knight, who would do anything to protect it. After months of living an ordinary civilian life while other heroes stood in for him, Bruce Wayne has finally returned to his rightful role as Gotham’s vigilante protector. As a grateful city welcomes back its savior, both Batman and the people he protects consider the legacy he has created. What would Gotham be without its hero? Could it survive? And furthermore, what would Bruce Wayne be without the Batman? As acclaimed writer Scott Snyder draws the final curtain on his game-changing Batman series, the newly returned Dark Knight battles familiar foes and new enemies. These exquisite standalone stories take the Dark Knight into an alternate dystopian future, as well as deep into his own past, questioning who he is, how he came to be and what his legacy must be… Legendary Batman writer Scott Snyder (Batman, All-Star Batman, American Vampire) and James Tynion IV (Batman Eternal) are joined by artists Greg Capullo (Spawn), Roge Antonio (Batman and Robin Eternal), ACO (Midnighter) and Riley Rossmo (Constantine: The Hellblazer) in Batman Volume 10: Epilogue. This final volume collects Batman #51-52, Batman: Futures End #1, Batman Annual #4 and Batman: Rebirth #1.

30 review for Batman, Volume 10: Epilogue

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Epilogue lives up to its name, in that it's just a sort of bye-bye volume made up of random leftover issues. Some are good, some are bad, and most are meh. If you're a Snyder/Capullo Batman completionist, you'll want it. Otherwise, see if you can borrow this one from the library or a friend, because I just don't think it's something most casual fans would want to pay $$ for it...but maybe I'm wrong? Ok, as others have mentioned, the best story by far was Snyder's farewell to Batman in issue 51. I c Epilogue lives up to its name, in that it's just a sort of bye-bye volume made up of random leftover issues. Some are good, some are bad, and most are meh. If you're a Snyder/Capullo Batman completionist, you'll want it. Otherwise, see if you can borrow this one from the library or a friend, because I just don't think it's something most casual fans would want to pay $$ for it...but maybe I'm wrong? Ok, as others have mentioned, the best story by far was Snyder's farewell to Batman in issue 51. I can't even...*chokes up* Good stuff. Future's End was on the other end of the spectrum for me. Ugh! Just...*spits* The idea that Bruce clones himself so Batman can continue on forever is vile, gross, creepy, and most importantly...very unBatman-like. I hate everything about that concept, and it's stuff like that that makes me less sad than everyone else to see Snyder leave this title. The other issues in here are ok, but they feel like filler. Which, I guess was the point of this volume. Toss in whatever was leftover and call it a day. Of course, like all the other New 52 titles, this volume ends with the (rather mediocre) Rebirth issue. Ok. Well, I guess that's all. Here's hoping I start enjoying this character again!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo weren’t just the standout creative team in DC’s New 52 (to be fair that wasn’t especially hard), even managing to outlive the poorly thought-out reboot, but are also arguably the finest creative team Batman’s ever had (Grant Morrison is the greatest Batman writer but he had a revolving door of artistic talent during his run from Frank Quitely to Tony Daniel to Andy Kubert whereas Snyder had a consistent collaborator in Capullo). The Court of Owls, Death of the Famil Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo weren’t just the standout creative team in DC’s New 52 (to be fair that wasn’t especially hard), even managing to outlive the poorly thought-out reboot, but are also arguably the finest creative team Batman’s ever had (Grant Morrison is the greatest Batman writer but he had a revolving door of artistic talent during his run from Frank Quitely to Tony Daniel to Andy Kubert whereas Snyder had a consistent collaborator in Capullo). The Court of Owls, Death of the Family, Zero Year - all amazing Batman arcs. So it’s disappointing that their fantastic run ends on such a weak note with Batman, Volume 10: Epilogue. I can see why DC dunit though - Batman’s a moneymaker, Snyder and Capullo’s names sell, etc. But be warned: Epilogue is essentially a dumping ground for the remaining Batman issues from that run that haven’t been printed elsewhere and only one is by Snyder/Capullo. And their issue is definitely the best: Gotham Is… references their first book, The Court of Owls, from Batman fighting his rogues in Arkham to knocking out some Owl people. It’s not their best work but I thought it was a nice way for Snyder/Capullo to round out their run. There’s a Future’s End issue by Ray Fawkes that’s readable but feels pointless (though I successfully avoided that event so I wouldn’t know if it’s relevant or not - probably not knowing DC!). Batman steals Lex’s Bizarro/cloning tech to make a new Batman and has to navigate Lex’s various traps. Eh. Snyder co-plotted it which is probably why it’s the only decent Ray Fawkes comic I’ve read! There’s an extended, and unnecessary, postscript to the garbage Arkham Manor storyline by James Tynion IV. An amnesiac, pre-Bloom Bruce Wayne has to fight Riddler, Mister Freeze and Clayface for a certain number of pages before wrapping it up. Boring, stupid, forgettable: sounds like Arkham Manor to me! Also by Tynion IV is The List, an issue about some list a juvenile Bruce made after his parents’ murders. Snooze. And the first first (because there were two #1 issues for money reasons) Rebirth Batman ish is included with Snyder’s input before handing over the reins to Tom King. Calendar Man is reimagined as a mutant who lives and dies according to the seasons. Pee-yew! Oh boy. Well, thank goodness Tom King came along when he did because Snyder was clearly losing it at that point! The legacy of the New 52 may be largely shitty but by far the diamonds in the rough were Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo’s Batman books. Most of them are definitely worth checking out for anyone looking to read some quality Batman, though it might be an idea to stop before Endgame, Bloom and this rubbish Epilogue stuff come around!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    A mostly satisfying conclusion to this segment of Snyder’s Batman run. I say “mostly” because this is something of a scattershot grab bag of issues; it’s a little bit like watching Jeopardy with that one friend who thinks he’s a lot smarter than he is and who shouts out at least seven answers (well, technically, questions) for each question (technically answer), occasionally getting one right, but usually justifying a catastrophic series of misfires with comments like, “Oh, I thought they were r A mostly satisfying conclusion to this segment of Snyder’s Batman run. I say “mostly” because this is something of a scattershot grab bag of issues; it’s a little bit like watching Jeopardy with that one friend who thinks he’s a lot smarter than he is and who shouts out at least seven answers (well, technically, questions) for each question (technically answer), occasionally getting one right, but usually justifying a catastrophic series of misfires with comments like, “Oh, I thought they were referring to the Sumerian Bible, of course” or “I guess they’re not familiar with how geometry actually works in the post-Dryer era” (when pressed as to who “Dryer” was, naturally, he mumbles something unintelligible and gets up to go get more Doritos). Snyder is a very good Batman writer, but I have a slight preference for Tom King’s recent work.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Donovan

    What a fucked up, cash grab last volume. Snyder and Capullo literally have one issue in this entire book which should have just been included in Volume 9. But where's the money in that? It's unfortunate because their issue is actually a fitting end to the series. Quiet, bittersweet, and peaceful. I'm glad to see Alfred's hand is back. It's a damn short story, yet still a solid 4 stars. Snyder's run really pulled me back into Batman comics with his unique gothic poeticism. And although this issue What a fucked up, cash grab last volume. Snyder and Capullo literally have one issue in this entire book which should have just been included in Volume 9. But where's the money in that? It's unfortunate because their issue is actually a fitting end to the series. Quiet, bittersweet, and peaceful. I'm glad to see Alfred's hand is back. It's a damn short story, yet still a solid 4 stars. Snyder's run really pulled me back into Batman comics with his unique gothic poeticism. And although this issue is fantastic, this final volume doesn't do it justice. The other issues, to put it kindly, are pointless and irrelevant, 2 stars at best, and had me skimming or skipping altogether. They were written and therefore had to be included somewhere. Fucking DC. You made a mockery of this last volume.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    So it's a wrap-up to the series but it fails in several instances but I suppose it does well enough. The bar had been high previously so this one is disappointing. I doubt it was Snyder's decision but DC put in a lot of side stories which diluted the epilogue. The artwork was very good. OVERALL GRADE: B minus.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    What new thing can I say about the cash grab Epilogue, volume 10 of the fine Snyder-Capullo run. Nothing, but that won’t stop me, sorry. I will say that these guys are among the best Batman creators ever, and I probably should just leave it that, but I’ll add that the ONLY piece they did in this mixed bag, “Gotham Is. . .” is the best thing in the volume, and should have been tacked on the end of the dramatic and memorable volume 9. It’s sort of reflective, a kind of bookend that takes us back t What new thing can I say about the cash grab Epilogue, volume 10 of the fine Snyder-Capullo run. Nothing, but that won’t stop me, sorry. I will say that these guys are among the best Batman creators ever, and I probably should just leave it that, but I’ll add that the ONLY piece they did in this mixed bag, “Gotham Is. . .” is the best thing in the volume, and should have been tacked on the end of the dramatic and memorable volume 9. It’s sort of reflective, a kind of bookend that takes us back to the beginning of their run, so it’s thoughtful and very good, I think. That piece is really the epilogue. The rest of the volume is mostly padding. Okay, the second real purpose of this volume is to begin the new one with a co-written Tom King-Scott Snyder Rebirth issue, but it is surprisingly forgettable in that these are two great writers working together. Maybe they wrote it over the phone? The Guy Fawkes Future’s End piece about Batman wanting to clone himself because, uh, Lex Luthor is into cloning?! Well, okay. . . next? The James Tynion issues are even less interesting to me. Okay, I’ve said enough. But if you are an obsessive completest, as I am, you will have to read this, so I did. Okay, it’s not terrible, overall. I read it all; I didn't throw it across the room. I just wish it had some coherence.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This is where all the leftover Batman new 52 stories came to die I guess. First up is a terrible Future's End story where Batman decides to clone himself. Art's bad, story falls flat just like all the other Future's End stories have. Next up is from the Batman Annual and takes place before Bruce Wayne got his memory back. Bruce goes to take Wayne Manor back from Arkham Asylum and a few of the rogue's gallery are waiting for him. This was one of the better stories in the book with OK art by Roge This is where all the leftover Batman new 52 stories came to die I guess. First up is a terrible Future's End story where Batman decides to clone himself. Art's bad, story falls flat just like all the other Future's End stories have. Next up is from the Batman Annual and takes place before Bruce Wayne got his memory back. Bruce goes to take Wayne Manor back from Arkham Asylum and a few of the rogue's gallery are waiting for him. This was one of the better stories in the book with OK art by Roge Antonio that reminded me some of Sean Murphy. Then we have issue 51, the only thing in the book actually by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo. It's a great farewell to the character. The power goes out in Gotham and Batman goes around the city trying to find the culprit. Issue 52 is written by James Tynion. The story is decent but Riley Rossmo should never be allowed around Batman again. His art is awful. The story flashs back on some of Batman's backstory of how he dealt with his parents' death. Finally is the Batman Rebirth issue that appears in multiple Batman GN. I'll leave it at it's not good.

  8. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    So let me make it clear. I thought this collection was a 2 star. Not all the stories. Future's End - 2/5 - Was okay. I honestly just read through it quickly, kind of boring. Rebirth 2/5 - I reviewed this with Rebirth Omnibus. Really boring, crappy ending, and I just didn't like this Bruce. Issue 52 - 3/5 - Was okay. I didn't feel like this much either. I think mostly comes to the art and Batman not sounding like...Batman? Issue 51 - 5/5 - This issue was stunning. This showed who and what Batman So let me make it clear. I thought this collection was a 2 star. Not all the stories. Future's End - 2/5 - Was okay. I honestly just read through it quickly, kind of boring. Rebirth 2/5 - I reviewed this with Rebirth Omnibus. Really boring, crappy ending, and I just didn't like this Bruce. Issue 52 - 3/5 - Was okay. I didn't feel like this much either. I think mostly comes to the art and Batman not sounding like...Batman? Issue 51 - 5/5 - This issue was stunning. This showed who and what Batman is about. It nearly made me cry by the end because we finally see Scott's final thoughts were on the cape crusader. HOnestly, this should have been the final issue in volume 9, it would have made that volume a 5/5. So yeah, read issue 51 for sure, amazing final issue to Scott's New52 run, but the rest you can skip easily.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    What was most frustrating about the ninth volume of Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo’s run on Batman, which, although it featured a terrific climax for their last big arc Superheavy, their final issue wasn’t included. So as a bit of cash-in from DC, this tenth volume came into publication as it features whatever issue was left to staple together. However, this didn’t stop this Bat-fan collecting all ten volumes in a hardcover format. Beginning with Batman: Futures End #1, this issue – as part of The What was most frustrating about the ninth volume of Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo’s run on Batman, which, although it featured a terrific climax for their last big arc Superheavy, their final issue wasn’t included. So as a bit of cash-in from DC, this tenth volume came into publication as it features whatever issue was left to staple together. However, this didn’t stop this Bat-fan collecting all ten volumes in a hardcover format. Beginning with Batman: Futures End #1, this issue – as part of The New 52’s Futures End weekly comic book miniseries – is a future story where an old Bruce Wayne tries to artificially create his own legacy by achieving a heist. It’s a fun action-packed tale drawn by Aco that evokes classic Superman lore, whilst tying in with what Snyder’s been doing during his run. Next up is Batman Annual #4, which took place during the events of Superheavy as the then-amnesiac Bruce makes a step back into Wayne Manor, which was a temporary facility for some of the villainous patients from Arkham Asylum. As with most annual issues, this is simply an additional short story that doesn’t have any significance towards any of the main story arcs, but tries to put a different spin into the possibility of Bruce/Batman being the maker of his own enemies and how he may as well as be an Arkham inmate. Once we get to issue #51, this is the main course as Snyder and Capullo throws in the final curtain as after the epic return of Bruce as the Dark Knight following his bloody and brutal battle with Mr. Bloom, this explores a "quiet night" for Gotham’s hero. Throughout this wonderful run, I have always praised the creative team on how consistent the storytelling is from one big arc to a one-off issue (even with the occasional fumble along the way), and in the case of this finale, it nicely bookends with the beginning of the series and ultimately is about what Batman means to Gotham where it might be a birthplace of horrific evil, there is still good people living in it. For an issue that isn’t action-driven, Capullo still provides motion to Batman’s stance and for many of the panels, he is presented as a silhouetted figure that is more effective than displaying his cool new outfit. Following the final Snyder/Capullo hurrah, #52 by writer James Tynion IV and artist Riley Rossmo doesn't add much in the wake of the previous issue, but it’s a touching character-based story that encompasses Bruce’s history from how he moves on following the death of his parents and how important his relationship with Alfred is. Reminiscent of the art of Tim Burton, Riley Rossmo shows a dynamic freshness to Batman and his Gotham surroundings, even if the new villain Crypsis isn’t that visually interesting. Finally to cap off this volume is Batman: Rebirth #1, marking the beginning of Tom King as the current writer of the main Batman title which reads like a natural progression of what came before. Although there isn’t much in the way of story such as an explanation over why Duke Thomas becoming part of the Bat-family, you do get a surreal new spin on Calendar Man, which gives an idea of Tom King (along with artist Mikel Janin) might take the series into weird directions. In the end, the Epilogue volume – with each issue helmed by a different creative team – is somewhat a mixed bag, but it nicely caps off Snyder and Capullo’s five-year run, which brought some of the best graphic storytelling towards the streets of Gotham City in recent history.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    The Snyder-Capullo run of Batman was phenomenal. This is the best that have happened in DC's New 52 era. Not that I'm complaining though, Batman could have ended with the Endgame arc. Although Mr. Bloom is quite interesting and the end of his arc has the biggest boom the City of Gotham ever has, it pales compared with the other story arcs. An unnecessary volume. Batman could have ended with volume nine, but DC knows we have ten fingers, so there you have it. And then you get this, a completely unn The Snyder-Capullo run of Batman was phenomenal. This is the best that have happened in DC's New 52 era. Not that I'm complaining though, Batman could have ended with the Endgame arc. Although Mr. Bloom is quite interesting and the end of his arc has the biggest boom the City of Gotham ever has, it pales compared with the other story arcs. An unnecessary volume. Batman could have ended with volume nine, but DC knows we have ten fingers, so there you have it. And then you get this, a completely unnecessary volume ten. Because DC has to make money and we don't have nine fingers. We have ten. The only worthwhile issue to read here is issue #51 which easily gets a five-star rating. Everything Snyder and Capullo has been giving us for five years has come to a full circle with this poignant sendoff issue. The other issues were just there merely to make this a "collected edition". It has Batman Future's End which you have probably bought way back before because of its lenticular cover, an Annual issue which is always a pain to read, a Batman Rebirth issue you have also bought before because it is a Rebirth special and a Batman issue 52, because the number 52 is DC's googoo gaagaa. In the end, people will still buy this book (like I did) only because it's hard to accept the fact that their shelves do not have this final New 52 Batman volume.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    I don't know if I'm more disappointed that Scott Snyder is off the main Batman title or Greg Capullo. They both killed it and Im sad to see that era ended.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Travis Duke

    i guess calling it Epilogue they were never trying to fool anyone but as a final volume to a great series its a complete letdown. The book contains various short stories that are scattered all over Bruce's life. Sure they tie into this series but it feels so strange knowing this is the last book. Maybe if they took out the "volume 10" and just called it epilogue everyone would be happier. The stories themselves are good but not great. Some involve Bruce coming home after is was Arkham asylum. An i guess calling it Epilogue they were never trying to fool anyone but as a final volume to a great series its a complete letdown. The book contains various short stories that are scattered all over Bruce's life. Sure they tie into this series but it feels so strange knowing this is the last book. Maybe if they took out the "volume 10" and just called it epilogue everyone would be happier. The stories themselves are good but not great. Some involve Bruce coming home after is was Arkham asylum. Another was Bruce chasing down a precious book that Alfred helped create when he was a just a boy. Sure they are good but in the context of a final volume AND relating to this series specifically it just doesn't feel right. The art is good for the most part. Sad to see this series end on such a low note

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    I think this is good at being what it is: an epilogue. We get the Futures End one shot and an Annual set before the return of Bruce Wayne Batman, both of which are enjoyable enough. Then we get the final 2 issues of Batman, which are kinda just one shots really to cap off the long run, one written by series writer Snyder and the other by his regular collaborator James Tynion All this stuff probably could have fit into the previous 2 volumes, but they wanted to pad out to an even 10 volumes

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    An average ending for a series that had some hard ups and soft downs. Love Snyder with Batman, but vol. 3 was the highlight by far and it never lived back up to that. Even in concluding the series.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Γιώργος Γιώτσας

    The only volume with no coherent story. Instead a collection of 5 different short stories to conclude a bigger story that had allready a conclusion? (see future vision at Volume 9). Still first two stories add.. something to the whole Snyder story. The other 3 had their ups and downs. It is a 2.5/5 ps. In total Snyder / Capullo "Batman" is one of the GREATEST Batman stories ever! A magnificent, bold, emotional and so-much-fun collection of 10 volumes! Thank you guys for this journey...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Boy, Snyder and company just aren't even trying anymore. There is absolutely no reason to read this volume. It's not a wrap-up of anything, despite being called "Epilogue." It's just a mish-mash of disconnected one-off stories that do nothing to highlight or expand upon the stories that came before. I'd even argue the only thing they do is hurt the previous volumes, thanks to a bunch of dumb, poorly-executed premises. Worst of all, there's only one story in this entire thing written by Snyder & Boy, Snyder and company just aren't even trying anymore. There is absolutely no reason to read this volume. It's not a wrap-up of anything, despite being called "Epilogue." It's just a mish-mash of disconnected one-off stories that do nothing to highlight or expand upon the stories that came before. I'd even argue the only thing they do is hurt the previous volumes, thanks to a bunch of dumb, poorly-executed premises. Worst of all, there's only one story in this entire thing written by Snyder & Capullo, the original creative team behind this series, and it's pretty weak. First off is Batman: Future's End, a confusing, meandering pile of crap that does not deserve to be collected anywhere. As I was reading it, I kept thinking "What the hell happened to Snyder? Sure, he's gotten weaker over time, but this is pure trash." Then, at the end of the issue, the words "Written by Ray Fawkes" showed up, and suddenly everything made sense. Then comes Batman Annual #4. This one somehow managed to not only be bad, but fully made me angry. It takes place during the period in which Bruce Wayne had amnesia (i.e. had no idea he was ever Batman), but rather than telling an interesting story there, it just ends up being Bruce Wayne: Normal Guy vs. Every Batman Villain. The villains of course have no good reason to be attacking Bruce Wayne since they have no idea he was Batman, but here they are anyway. And then this Bruce, who time and again has been shown to be gentle, kind, and devoid of any fighting ability, totally outsmarts them all and kicks their asses. Guys, you could at least commit to your own premise. From here it's the final two issues of this run of Batman, and they're both pretty throwaway. One where Batman goes out and literally has no crime to fight (how interesting), and then one where we see young Bruce struggling to figure out how to move on after his parents' deaths. Wow, what a new idea. Also, I genuinely laughed out loud when young Bruce reveals that he's writing in a notebook called "How To Move On." That couldn't be any more on the nose if it was a nostril. Having now finished Snyder & Capullo's entire New 52 Batman run, it's safe to say I found it to be vastly overrated. Yes, it starts off great, but it's mostly pretty terrible. Snyder falls back on the same habits over and over: excruciatingly long monologues, characters holding forth on topics they should really have no expertise in, gigantic threats to the entire city. He clearly holds his own writing in very high regard, and it really started getting on my nerves by this point. This book, as well as several before it, is straight-up boring, and gives me no hope for his All-Star Batman or Dark Nights: Metal storylines. Oh well!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    I went into this knowing ahead of time that it was a catch-all for previous one off stories. The second half of Snyder's run wasn't been too appealing to me either, meaning my expectations were fairly low. However, I did enjoy the "future Batman" story, where he's at the end of his life and attempts one last mission that can save him. I also liked "The List" which gives you a peek into the mind of a young Bruce who begins to formulate his plans on becoming Batman. The one Snyder/Capullo story wa I went into this knowing ahead of time that it was a catch-all for previous one off stories. The second half of Snyder's run wasn't been too appealing to me either, meaning my expectations were fairly low. However, I did enjoy the "future Batman" story, where he's at the end of his life and attempts one last mission that can save him. I also liked "The List" which gives you a peek into the mind of a young Bruce who begins to formulate his plans on becoming Batman. The one Snyder/Capullo story was average, although it reminded me I'm going to miss Capullo's art. For the completists of Synder's run and New52 Batman, you will probably need to read this. It does end with a lead-in to the Rebirth King Batman.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    Barely more coherent than Batman: Odyssey, which isn't saying much. I wish I could un-read this collection of odds and ends. A very generous 2 stars. Barely more coherent than Batman: Odyssey, which isn't saying much. I wish I could un-read this collection of odds and ends. A very generous 2 stars.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Batman: Epilogue collects the last two issues (Batman #51–52) of the 2011 on-going series with Batman: Futures End #1, Batman Annual #4, and Batman: Rebirth and covers five one-issue storylines. "Gotham Is" is a one-issue storyline (Batman #51) that has Bruce Wayne as Batman reestablishing his return by taking on the Arkham Inmates: Bane, Clayface, Riddler, Scarecrow, Posion Ivy, Mister Freeze, Killer Croc, The Court of Owls and the Gotham Organized Crime in Penguin, Black Mask and Great White Sh Batman: Epilogue collects the last two issues (Batman #51–52) of the 2011 on-going series with Batman: Futures End #1, Batman Annual #4, and Batman: Rebirth and covers five one-issue storylines. "Gotham Is" is a one-issue storyline (Batman #51) that has Bruce Wayne as Batman reestablishing his return by taking on the Arkham Inmates: Bane, Clayface, Riddler, Scarecrow, Posion Ivy, Mister Freeze, Killer Croc, The Court of Owls and the Gotham Organized Crime in Penguin, Black Mask and Great White Shark – not to mention the Joker. "The List" is also a one-issue storyline (Batman #52) that reviews the back story of Bruce Wayne as Batman and the lessons he learns that he put in list form. "Madhouse" is a one-issue storyline (Batman Annual #4) and stars Bruce Wayne trying to figure out his life without Batman and to determine whether it is possible to truly escape the shadow of the Dark Knight. Two tie-in events are also included in this trade paperback. "Future Ends: Remains" is from the Future Ends event and stars Bruce Wayne, who had his back broken, trying to continue his legacy through clones. "Batman: Rebirth" is from the Rebirth event and has Bruce Wayne taking on Julian Day as Calendar Man with the help of Duke Thomas, who he has taken under his wing to train to be his next protégé. Scott Snyder (Batman #51, Batman: Futures End, and Batman: Rebirth), James Tynion IV (Batman #52 and Batman Annual #4), Ray Fawkes (Batman: Futures End), and Tom King (Batman: Rebirth) are the writer for trade paperback. For the most part, I enjoy most of the stories – individually, but having them together in one trade paperback seems like a hodgepodge mess with no theme running throughout except that it stars one person – Batman. Greg Capullo (Batman #51), Riley Rossmo (Batman #52), ACO (Batman: Futures End), Roge Antonio (Batman Annual #4), and Mikel Janín (Batman: Rebirth) are the pencilers for the trade paperback. While I like each penciler's style individually – especially Janín, they don't mesh well together and the artistic flow seems somewhat jagged. Overall, this Batman series was rather well with epic storylines introducing the Court of Owls, Zero Year, and Endgame. Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo have re-launched the Batman franchise rather well with incredible stories for the most part and consistent and even art as Capullo was the main penciler for the series. Along with Batman, the team has redefined the Joker and Riddler for the New 52 and introduced two new characters in Duke Thomas and Harper Row. All in all, Batman: Epilogue is a somewhat mediocre conclusion to a wonderful series.

  20. 5 out of 5

    47Time

    This banal ending to this series might be caused by the requirement to have 52 issues. The Gordon as Batman stories began a downward spiral into mediocrity. Gotham is thrown into complete darkness. Batman to the rescue! (view spoiler)[He chacks known criminals, but the power outage was caused by a natural phenomenon and it soon comes back on. Batman is left high and dry with nothing to save. (hide spoiler)] The 52nd issue at least has some relevance to the character. After his parents' ere killed  This banal ending to this series might be caused by the requirement to have 52 issues. The Gordon as Batman stories began a downward spiral into mediocrity. Gotham is thrown into complete darkness. Batman to the rescue! (view spoiler)[He chacks known criminals, but the power outage was caused by a natural phenomenon and it soon comes back on. Batman is left high and dry with nothing to save. (hide spoiler)] The 52nd issue at least has some relevance to the character. After his parents' ere killed Bruce went thrugh therapy to help him cope with the loss. He wrote a list of things that he needs to do in order to move on. (view spoiler)[A thief tried to steal the notebook, but Batman stops him. Bruce feels a connection to his past via the notebook and to Alfred in particular for never giving up on the boy. (hide spoiler)] The Rebirth issue is only a beginning to a new series, so it's tough to rate, but the Futures End one-shot is cool. Bruce is old now and wants to clone himself, but lacks the technology. He will steal Luthor's work to clone himself and add the memories he saved in the totally scifi device he developed previously.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Oli Kidsley

    I dont think this is essential to the Snyder/Capullo run, and actually think some issues sour the amazing ending of the previous book. But some issues rule and some don't.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brian Poole

    DC closes out the New 52 era of Batman with the Epilogue collection, gathering the remaining one-off stories from the run. The entry from the Futures End event sees a possible Batman from five years in the future, physically broken, risk his life to ensure the endurance of the Batman mythos. The Batman Annual features Bruce Wayne, still unencumbered of the Batman baggage, returning to Wayne Manor and facing down a threat to his family home. The final Scott Snyder/Greg Capullo issue sees a rejuven DC closes out the New 52 era of Batman with the Epilogue collection, gathering the remaining one-off stories from the run. The entry from the Futures End event sees a possible Batman from five years in the future, physically broken, risk his life to ensure the endurance of the Batman mythos. The Batman Annual features Bruce Wayne, still unencumbered of the Batman baggage, returning to Wayne Manor and facing down a threat to his family home. The final Scott Snyder/Greg Capullo issue sees a rejuvenated Batman take to the streets during a blackout, while contemplating what Gotham City means to its inhabitants. Batman takes on a bank robber after a crucial piece of Bruce Wayne’s past. And finally, the Batman Rebirth special tees up the character for his next phase. As a collection, Epilogue isn’t cohesive, but that’s the nature of an odds and sods collection like this. The writing comes from some combination of Snyder and James Tynion IV (with contributions from Ray Fawkes and Tom King). While there’s no logical connective thread between these stories, taken individually, they can be quite enjoyable. The Futures End story is more or less a “what if” moment, but a contest of wills between Batman and Lex Luthor will always be worth reading. The final Snyder/Capullo issue will be a sentimental favorite for a lot of fans, providing a surprisingly optimistic coda to the often dark New 52 years. The Rebirth special, where Snyder smoothly hands the reins to King, isn’t plot-intensive, but does a nice job of piquing interest for King’s run. Throughout, the writers have a strong read on Batman/Bruce and his key supporting characters, so that even if there’s no unifying plot, readers are getting interesting character studies that explore different shadings of the venerable hero. The art is all over the place. Capullo’s swan song is a decent capper to his time on the book. By the end, the artist has developed such a strong take on Batman that fans can only hope he returns to the character at some point. Mikel Janin produces some promising work on the Rebirth issue, turning out some impressive imagery that bodes well for the new era. Of the handful of other artists that contribute, Aco is probably the most memorable, his scratchy, paranoiac ethic a fairly strong fit for a dystopian Batman story. Batman: Epilogue isn’t really essential and probably doesn’t make sense unless you’ve already consumed the rest of the New 52 run. For established fans, it’s a decent transitional collection between creative regimes.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed Ahmed

    The Stories in this Vol was not That Good as others But i am Sad that this Run on Batman Has Ended.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Relstuart

    The end. Several issues in this book with different creative teams telling different shot stories. Overall Snyder and Capullo did a good job on Batman. From a collection standpoint this series does miss some things as a stand alone because things happen in other books you don't see here. It will be interesting to see if DC will do another story from this series in Absolute, try their hand at a few omnibus volumes, or just move on.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    New 52 Batman really ended with Batman, Volume 9: Bloom. You can either read this random collection of issues or skip it --but I recommend you read it just for the 5 star issues "Gotham Is" by Scott Snyder and "The List" by James Tynion IV. "Gotham Is" is a short meaningful standalone. We have Bruce and Alfred (with a new hand!) bantering in the cave ("This brand of justice tastes a lot like bananas."). It's funny, and sappy, and slightly sinister. "Gotham Is" (the newspaper column) is written ou New 52 Batman really ended with Batman, Volume 9: Bloom. You can either read this random collection of issues or skip it --but I recommend you read it just for the 5 star issues "Gotham Is" by Scott Snyder and "The List" by James Tynion IV. "Gotham Is" is a short meaningful standalone. We have Bruce and Alfred (with a new hand!) bantering in the cave ("This brand of justice tastes a lot like bananas."). It's funny, and sappy, and slightly sinister. "Gotham Is" (the newspaper column) is written out over the issue's dark pages as Batman watches over a dark Gotham after the power goes out. The issue ends with a sweet line how Gotham is Batman and Batman is Gotham. "The List" is my favorite because it deals with a mourning (child) Bruce after the death of his parents. He makes a list of 51 way to "move on" and sets out to conquer each number. At the end of the issue we see that Alfred had written in a number #52 (view spoiler)[Remeber that your parents will always be proud of you. (hide spoiler)] that Batman tries to work on every night. <3

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Snyder's Batman run started out so, so well, but faltered mightily once it hit Zero Year, at least in my opinion. Court of Owls is already a classic Batman story, and I could easily see it as the inspiration for a Batman movie in the near future. But man, things really fell off pretty quickly. I enjoyed Death of the Family a lot, and Zero Year was fine, but everything after was pretty terrible. The Batman: Eternal storyline, which was supposed to help set up Endgame, was a complete waste of time Snyder's Batman run started out so, so well, but faltered mightily once it hit Zero Year, at least in my opinion. Court of Owls is already a classic Batman story, and I could easily see it as the inspiration for a Batman movie in the near future. But man, things really fell off pretty quickly. I enjoyed Death of the Family a lot, and Zero Year was fine, but everything after was pretty terrible. The Batman: Eternal storyline, which was supposed to help set up Endgame, was a complete waste of time - it didn't help that the ending was very predictable from the first volume. Endgame felt like a hastily put together story that needed about two more drafts to bring it up to the quality story that it could have been, and Superheavy/Bloom were just straight trash to me. To me, Snyder's run started with Black Mirror, and ended at Death of the Family. Everything after that was by a Snyder imitator.

  27. 5 out of 5

    ((Silver O. Smith - "Which role do you prefer to play in stories?" "The angel. Who helps them once in their life, and then makes a quiet exit."))

    - 2* = Just didn't feel like five. A series that made me read to the end with Joker: Death of the Family and Joker: Endgame (Joker was just incredibly well written) being the highlights. Court of the Owls was certainly the worst out of all of it but still pleasing to know more about the universe. What I didn't like was the theme throughout the entire series: immortality and resurrection. It wasn't needed and, frankly, it's a theme overdone. I would have liked something new and while I agree, Batm - 2* = Just didn't feel like five. A series that made me read to the end with Joker: Death of the Family and Joker: Endgame (Joker was just incredibly well written) being the highlights. Court of the Owls was certainly the worst out of all of it but still pleasing to know more about the universe. What I didn't like was the theme throughout the entire series: immortality and resurrection. It wasn't needed and, frankly, it's a theme overdone. I would have liked something new and while I agree, Batman can never die, the fix to that problem was just annoying. I like Batman comics and while I do not believe I wasted my time on this series, the fact that I was not a fan of Bruce Wayne. . . I do not plan to read more comics by Scott Snyder. If I pick up a comic with his name on it, I'll read, but I won't purposely search them out. P.S. Even if the book is listed as #.#, still read it. It helps.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    This is the completionist's volume. There's no main story-line here, just a collection of loose issues, including the last two issues of the main run. It's worth reading for those - while not a whole lot of action is going on, the 'Gotham Is...' issue makes for a strong capstone to the New52 Batman experience. The Annual story, which puts a pre-re-Batman Bruce Wayne up against a few of the Arkham crew, has its moments but doesn't do a whole lot. The Future's End story is silly, getting some joke This is the completionist's volume. There's no main story-line here, just a collection of loose issues, including the last two issues of the main run. It's worth reading for those - while not a whole lot of action is going on, the 'Gotham Is...' issue makes for a strong capstone to the New52 Batman experience. The Annual story, which puts a pre-re-Batman Bruce Wayne up against a few of the Arkham crew, has its moments but doesn't do a whole lot. The Future's End story is silly, getting some jokes via Luther's automated defenses, but again isn't particularly important. And the Rebirth preview isn't anything spectacular either. It's a decent collection that exists because DC wanted an extra volume instead of putting Issues 51 and 52 in with Volume 9. If you're okay with that, it's worth a read. It's a decent send-off for the era.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emma Gerts

    This final volume fairly neatly sums up what I felt about the arc as a whole - hits and misses. Some of the little vignettes here were great, some I was bored with. The first story - Batman cloning himself over and over again - almost had me throwing the book across the room in disgust. The "Gotham Is" story had me remembering over again why it is I love Batman so much. There are moments in this arc I would strongly recommend to any Batfan. There are others I wish I could unread.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Mitchell

    So basically I paid $22 for the final issue of Batman and 4 standalone stories that range from "just ok" to "terrible"? Pretty disappointing, however the actual finale was decent so at least there's that. Also the art makes up for some of the lack of substance, but overall, they should have just included this epilogue in the previous volume.

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