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Justice in an Age of Metal and Men

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Librarian's note: This is an alternate cover edition for ASIN: B00ISKWNC2 Technology has boomed in the years since Texas became independent. Antigravity’s cheap. Weapons shoot all manner of energy. Human modification has become as common as football on a Friday night. Yet, not everyone embraces technology. When a rancher is murdered, Sheriff J.D. Crow calls upon his old-fashi Librarian's note: This is an alternate cover edition for ASIN: B00ISKWNC2 Technology has boomed in the years since Texas became independent. Antigravity’s cheap. Weapons shoot all manner of energy. Human modification has become as common as football on a Friday night. Yet, not everyone embraces technology. When a rancher is murdered, Sheriff J.D. Crow calls upon his old-fashioned tracking skills to find the killer. When the trail leads him to a complex conspiracy, J.D. is forced to confront the very core of his beliefs. Doing the right thing has always been straightforward, but now things don’t seem so simple. What does it mean to hold hard the line of Justice in an Age of Metal and Men?


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Librarian's note: This is an alternate cover edition for ASIN: B00ISKWNC2 Technology has boomed in the years since Texas became independent. Antigravity’s cheap. Weapons shoot all manner of energy. Human modification has become as common as football on a Friday night. Yet, not everyone embraces technology. When a rancher is murdered, Sheriff J.D. Crow calls upon his old-fashi Librarian's note: This is an alternate cover edition for ASIN: B00ISKWNC2 Technology has boomed in the years since Texas became independent. Antigravity’s cheap. Weapons shoot all manner of energy. Human modification has become as common as football on a Friday night. Yet, not everyone embraces technology. When a rancher is murdered, Sheriff J.D. Crow calls upon his old-fashioned tracking skills to find the killer. When the trail leads him to a complex conspiracy, J.D. is forced to confront the very core of his beliefs. Doing the right thing has always been straightforward, but now things don’t seem so simple. What does it mean to hold hard the line of Justice in an Age of Metal and Men?

30 review for Justice in an Age of Metal and Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Teal

    This post-apocalyptic Western with a gay MC is quirky and occasionally funny, with a unique take on future Texas. It's the first in the series, but I thought it worked fine as a standalone. This post-apocalyptic Western with a gay MC is quirky and occasionally funny, with a unique take on future Texas. It's the first in the series, but I thought it worked fine as a standalone.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda ~ they got the mustard out! ~

    Well, this certainly was different. Kind of like if Robocop were a washed out has-been that held onto his badge too long, set in a world full of barely-humans addicted to their tech so much that they turn themselves into it. There's a mystery of sorts, that doesn't get solved in anything resembling proper police procedure, but we're in a dystopian future where people prefer to have metal skin and flashing eyes than actually being human, so whatever. If anti-heroes are your thing, you might like Well, this certainly was different. Kind of like if Robocop were a washed out has-been that held onto his badge too long, set in a world full of barely-humans addicted to their tech so much that they turn themselves into it. There's a mystery of sorts, that doesn't get solved in anything resembling proper police procedure, but we're in a dystopian future where people prefer to have metal skin and flashing eyes than actually being human, so whatever. If anti-heroes are your thing, you might like this more. I did appreciate the world building, such as it was, but after this year, I don't know if I'm in a mood for this type of story, where good intentions are barely discernible from bad ones, and where humans have screwed up nature so badly that we're barely hanging onto existence. Not sure if I'm going to continue this or not. Edit: And also, I refuse to believe there's any future, I don't care how dystopian, where we use the metric system. Like, what even? Texas is its own country? Sure, why not. They already think they are anyway. People modding themselves into half-machines? That's a standard in sci-fi, so whatever. But using the metric system? I don't think so. And it's not because we aren't taught it, because we are, but for one reason or another it never took off here and I don't see that changing any time soon.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    I actually really like science fiction, but it seems that wild wild west is only ever appealing to me when featuring the considerable charms of Will Smith. So this sci fi western thing didn’t quite work for me, tried as I might. This isn’t to say there was something inherently wrong with the book. In fact, it was objectively quite good for what it was…there was some very interesting world building of a future world where Texas has finally, finally seceded from the Union after decades of war and I actually really like science fiction, but it seems that wild wild west is only ever appealing to me when featuring the considerable charms of Will Smith. So this sci fi western thing didn’t quite work for me, tried as I might. This isn’t to say there was something inherently wrong with the book. In fact, it was objectively quite good for what it was…there was some very interesting world building of a future world where Texas has finally, finally seceded from the Union after decades of war and became what it was always meant to do, a near lawless free for all desert wasteland of gun totting violent individuals with barely a glimpse of civilization to be found outside of Austin. Actually, that doesn’t sound too far from present day Texas, but the Texas of the author’s imagination went all cyberpunk, high tech, low lives. Since it is nearly lawless there are still some who would serve the law. Such as the book’s protagonist, Sheriff J.D., a war veteran with a robotic arm to show for it. J.D. gets involved in solving a seemingly simple local case that turns out to have statewide political and economic ramifications. Enter action, high speed chases on flying vehicles and gun fights made challenging by everyone’s enhanced bulletproof skin. It’s fun, it reads quickly, it has a properly grizzled lead (who is refreshingly gay in a subtle matter of fact way…surprising for Texas, future or not)…it’s just too dusty, too Texan, too western for my liking. Don’t let this reader/book mismatch put you off checking it out, especially if the idea of science fiction cyberpunk western appeals to you.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mike Kalmbach

    Justice in an Age of Metal and Men is a rough-and-tumble futuristic dystopian sci-fi with a Western flair. It's fast-paced and exciting, with short chapters perfect for night-time reading (when I usually read for pleasure). It's not really steampunk, but it does have the same feeling as many of those novels--it is probably more appropriate to classify this as cyberpunk, though I haven't read much of that genre. Overall, I enjoyed this novel for its imagination of one possible future (and the new/ Justice in an Age of Metal and Men is a rough-and-tumble futuristic dystopian sci-fi with a Western flair. It's fast-paced and exciting, with short chapters perfect for night-time reading (when I usually read for pleasure). It's not really steampunk, but it does have the same feeling as many of those novels--it is probably more appropriate to classify this as cyberpunk, though I haven't read much of that genre. Overall, I enjoyed this novel for its imagination of one possible future (and the new/updated technologies that involves), the moral quandaries between the haves and have-nots, and the dispensation of justice in a world that largely ignores the law. JD also makes for a gritty, realistic character who keeps you turning the pages. I'd recommend this to folks who love Westerns, shows like Joss Whedon's Firefly or Amazon's Falling Skies, and a bit of dystopian science fiction. In future books in this world (assuming there are more coming), I'd hope to see more on the resource scarcity (water, oil, other resources) that surely impact this world, as well as the broader consequences of the second Civil War. I'd like to see how the Civil War changed this world, and better understand how it affected the rest of the world. What is the world population? Do countries communicate with each other? Have we colonized space yet?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I enjoyed this book. I suspect if you enjoy either Zane Grey, or Neil Stephenson..then you should give this book a try. It had an easy pace that kept me wanting to read more. There was alot of action, more than I'm used to in a book this size, but very well written action scenes! The main character, JD is great and really keeps you invested in the outcome of the book. He's very interesting, and entertaining. I hope this will turn into a series because I want to see how the character JD develops, I enjoyed this book. I suspect if you enjoy either Zane Grey, or Neil Stephenson..then you should give this book a try. It had an easy pace that kept me wanting to read more. There was alot of action, more than I'm used to in a book this size, but very well written action scenes! The main character, JD is great and really keeps you invested in the outcome of the book. He's very interesting, and entertaining. I hope this will turn into a series because I want to see how the character JD develops, I would definitely read more!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    I enjoyed this book and the voice of the main character. Although I haven't read books from this genre much, I found it entertaining and interesting. I felt a bit like I was reading a book in the Old West in Texas, but with a futuristic twist! I thought there were many creative aspects, such as flying cars and motorcycles. Also, the plot and story were believable and interesting and kept me reading it until the end. I enjoyed this book and the voice of the main character. Although I haven't read books from this genre much, I found it entertaining and interesting. I felt a bit like I was reading a book in the Old West in Texas, but with a futuristic twist! I thought there were many creative aspects, such as flying cars and motorcycles. Also, the plot and story were believable and interesting and kept me reading it until the end.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gerry Burnie

    A futuristic story with its roots in "Gunsmoke" and "The Rifleman." 4.5 Bees To see the full review, to to: Gerry B's Book Reviews A futuristic story with its roots in "Gunsmoke" and "The Rifleman." 4.5 Bees To see the full review, to to: Gerry B's Book Reviews

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    I truly enjoyed reading this book. Anyone interested in this topic should give the book a shot. It's a good one! Thanks for offering the book as a Goodreads give-away. I'm happy to own a copy! I truly enjoyed reading this book. Anyone interested in this topic should give the book a shot. It's a good one! Thanks for offering the book as a Goodreads give-away. I'm happy to own a copy!

  9. 5 out of 5

    K.

    I won a free copy from the Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Program and think that it interesting. I would recommend it to everyone.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Len

    Good pacing, good transitions from humor to regret to fear, etc. Quirky, and the reader is not pounded with descriptions of the future tech which are still central to the story. Odd and clever.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ambre

    More than meets the eye This is one of those books that really is about more than the story. Justice is an old west gunslinger set in a future nation of Texas, the landscape of which has been altered by global warming. The society was created in the aftermath of a civil war between urban elites and rural producers. There are lots of added goodies like mechanical body upgrades and flying cars. The worldbuilding is top notch. I was impressed every page by the insight and thought put into creating t More than meets the eye This is one of those books that really is about more than the story. Justice is an old west gunslinger set in a future nation of Texas, the landscape of which has been altered by global warming. The society was created in the aftermath of a civil war between urban elites and rural producers. There are lots of added goodies like mechanical body upgrades and flying cars. The worldbuilding is top notch. I was impressed every page by the insight and thought put into creating this unlikely but fascinating future. The minor plotline in this story follows Jasper Davis Crow, the sheriff of a small ranching town. He and his new deputy Trish (who was sent from the city, and who he dislikes) are investigating the death of a dairy farmer. The plot thickens quickly and involves a massive conspiracy, "Big Milk," nanobots, and mind control. There are moments of brilliance, and moments that make you go "huh? What just happened?" The ending sets up for a series with this as the sendoff. Crow is of ambiguous sexuality but mostly gay, but there is no romance at all in this book. His sexuality is backstory. I enjoyed the play of power against power. The city people had the power of wealth and technology and organized action, while the outlanders controlled access to food and milk (which was needed to power the nanobots that keep people going). Both sides resented the power that the other had over them, and there had already been one civil war that resulted in a draw. There are lots of parallels that could be drawn here. And of course climate post-apocalyptic stories have new relevance in the age of Trump. This story also has something to say about religion and authoritarianism. Lots of food for thought. I find the writing style is reminiscent of Jim Butcher, and the book has a similar mood to Dresden Files with the morally flexible and irreverent hero. The overall presentation is less polished but it's worth a read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steve Semler

    Definitely worth reading! I was fascinated by the concept of a cyberpunk Western and bought the book from the author's signing table at a convention. Eichenlaub pulled off the mix amazingly, with an excellent plot that was believable and kept me guessing until the last few chapters. He included enough hints to give the reader that, "Oh, yeah! I see where that clue fits in!" or "I can't believe I missed that!" feeling that a good crime/detective story should deliver. The characters and the settin Definitely worth reading! I was fascinated by the concept of a cyberpunk Western and bought the book from the author's signing table at a convention. Eichenlaub pulled off the mix amazingly, with an excellent plot that was believable and kept me guessing until the last few chapters. He included enough hints to give the reader that, "Oh, yeah! I see where that clue fits in!" or "I can't believe I missed that!" feeling that a good crime/detective story should deliver. The characters and the setting had just enough of a piece-by-piece introduction and build to keep it developing without being distracting or going into long expositions about the history and how the future came to be the way it was. The future setting--technological, social, political, environmental, economic--is well thought out and presented as needed. This left me with some confusion at times, but held together very well and served the story over the course of the book. There are a couple of points that threw me off a little, but nothing big. The main character gets beat up and then drives on a bit too often to remain believable, to me, but it wasn't gratuitous, action-movie nonsense; just, "After all that just happened, you can STILL get into the next scrap?" There is a lot of grit on top of the tech in a way that makes sense for the character and story. A couple of supporting characters do things that are never explained, and this goes unresolved at the end. Not big, but a couple of normal distractions. I think this is Eichenlaub's first novel, so he did a very good job on the writing, overall. "Justice" is a book I definitely recommend. I am looking forward to reading more in Eichenlaub's series/setting.

  13. 5 out of 5

    A.R. Zerby

    I got my copy at an author signing in Rochester at Collective Books and Records. How cool! Fun book. Anthony crafts an interesting future world full of tech including anti-gravity and man/machine hybrids. He incorporates it all in a plot pitting the downtrodden on the fringe of civilization against the entitled townies. His protagonist dispenses justice as Sheriff in a lawless landscape. The plot and characters are well written with clever dialogue and fast pacing. The author wraps everything up I got my copy at an author signing in Rochester at Collective Books and Records. How cool! Fun book. Anthony crafts an interesting future world full of tech including anti-gravity and man/machine hybrids. He incorporates it all in a plot pitting the downtrodden on the fringe of civilization against the entitled townies. His protagonist dispenses justice as Sheriff in a lawless landscape. The plot and characters are well written with clever dialogue and fast pacing. The author wraps everything up in a whirlwind ending. This reader wants to investigate Anthony's world again and will do so in Book 2.

  14. 4 out of 5

    William Wheeler

    Met the author last year and purchase the book from him. Nice guy! First time reading anything by him. It was an awesome story. One is which I can relate to. Each character I loved and I really didn't have everything figured out until the story told me. You know sometimes you can figure out who did what early on and then you have to push yourself to finish the book. I didn't have that problem in this book. I was guessing up until the last couple pages of who did what and why. Met the author last year and purchase the book from him. Nice guy! First time reading anything by him. It was an awesome story. One is which I can relate to. Each character I loved and I really didn't have everything figured out until the story told me. You know sometimes you can figure out who did what early on and then you have to push yourself to finish the book. I didn't have that problem in this book. I was guessing up until the last couple pages of who did what and why.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Norman

    an interesting book in futuristic Texas. An old fastion sherif JD Crow prefers things slow and peaceful but that evaporates when he is called into a murder on a local ranch. A new female deputy does not help matter much since she is much more high tech than the sherif and he resents that but justice much prevail. Humor and action all make for a good read oin the old western sense.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    Meh I like westerners and I love science fiction. But I don't much like this book. The plot was obtuse. The plot holes are huge (a huge explosion and everyone shows up in the next scene? What's that?) the characters are wooden, and the locale is uninviting. I doubt I will read anything else by this author. Meh I like westerners and I love science fiction. But I don't much like this book. The plot was obtuse. The plot holes are huge (a huge explosion and everyone shows up in the next scene? What's that?) the characters are wooden, and the locale is uninviting. I doubt I will read anything else by this author.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is a great read if you don't mind some over the top tech supposedly in place in the future. This is my first sci-fi western murder mystery. Didn't know that genre even existed. The story is told in first person and MC comes across as an interesting and likeable character. First in a series but still a complete story. This is a great read if you don't mind some over the top tech supposedly in place in the future. This is my first sci-fi western murder mystery. Didn't know that genre even existed. The story is told in first person and MC comes across as an interesting and likeable character. First in a series but still a complete story.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    The writing was good enough that I kept reading, even though I didn't like the world presented in the story. I think it is smartly put together and despite not particularly liking the world, I like the protagonist enough to get the second book, just to see what happens next. That's some good writing. The writing was good enough that I kept reading, even though I didn't like the world presented in the story. I think it is smartly put together and despite not particularly liking the world, I like the protagonist enough to get the second book, just to see what happens next. That's some good writing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pedro Bedro

    Sometimes you have to rely on someone who is less than perfect to come up with a solution to your problems and I'm this case J. D. is just that someone. Enough tech to do the job tempered with humanity and determination. Sometimes you have to rely on someone who is less than perfect to come up with a solution to your problems and I'm this case J. D. is just that someone. Enough tech to do the job tempered with humanity and determination.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Scooby Doo

    DNF 20% I like sci-fi but the advanced tech in this story was too farfetched for me, e.g., bulletproof skin? It seemed more like a fantasy than sci-fi. And the twists and turns of the plot are too arbitrary, whenever some new deus ex machine tech comes along.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angus Watson

    An engaging adventure mystery told with old Western style and gentle humour.

  22. 4 out of 5

    David G Donaldson

    Not my usual reading. Engaging and inventive. I liked main characters but sometimes got lost in the plot but it came to a satisfactory end.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Grant

    Different I Was confused about some of the tech. Ok read. It Didn’t make me want to read the next book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gwenellen

    Review for Justice in an Age of Metal and Men “I wore cowboy boots and a dark brown duster made of real oilskin. I chewed snuff derived from a real fine tobacco extract. I had Texas Army-issued black metal replacing my whole left arm. I carried a modified Smith and Wesson Model 500 that had been manufactured before neural implants were even a thing. I believed in traditional Texas values, right down to my soul. Nobody was above the law and the law ought to stay out of people’s business when it’s Review for Justice in an Age of Metal and Men “I wore cowboy boots and a dark brown duster made of real oilskin. I chewed snuff derived from a real fine tobacco extract. I had Texas Army-issued black metal replacing my whole left arm. I carried a modified Smith and Wesson Model 500 that had been manufactured before neural implants were even a thing. I believed in traditional Texas values, right down to my soul. Nobody was above the law and the law ought to stay out of people’s business when it’s not needed. As sheriff, my job was to keep it that way.” This introductory paragraph from Anthony W. Eichenlaub’s book, Justice in an Age of Metal and Men, perfectly sums up the main character; Sheriff J.D. Crow. Believe me, Sherif Crow is about to have a couple of really bad days which will test both the mettle of his conviction and the metal of his army issued prosthesis. J.D. Crow is a typical hero in many ways, but with enough quirky elements to make him likeable, annoying, and extremely interesting. He’s a man trying to do his job, who doesn’t always make the best decisions, but is tenacious enough to stick it through to the very end. I understand from my kids that the book fits a genre called Cyberpunk. I’m an old science fiction fan. I hail back to the days of the Apollo program, Heinlein, Ray Bradbury and the original Star Trek series. Space operas in other words. I have to admit I don’t know a lot about Cyberpunk, so of course I looked it up online. I didn’t know that the classic movie ‘Bladerunner’ is Cyberpunk. Well, there’s a reason that my kids call me a dinosaur. However, if “Justice in an Age of Metal and Men is an example of Cyberpunk, I’ll be signing up for more. I found the story a little confusing in a couple of places, but not enough to affect the fun I had reading it. Eichenlaub’s writing is excellent and I had no trouble immersing myself in the world that he presents and I appreciated that I didn’t need a Master’s in Science to understand what was going on. The pacing and flow of the story kept me reading to find out what would happen next. I have the feeling that Sheriff Crow’s story isn’t finished yet and I look forward to getting to know him better in the future. Most of all, I very much liked the fact that the story is complete and satisfying on its own. I hate being forced to read a series of four or five books to find out what the end of a story is. It’s one of the reasons that I stopped reading fantasy. Justice in an Age of Metal and Men is well written and fun to read and I look forward to more writing from Anthony W. Eichenlaub. Overall, I give it a 4.5 out of five stars. Thanks Anthony!

  25. 4 out of 5

    J. Else

    This book has a great narrative that is delightfully sarcastic. I enjoyed the way the story unfolds. (view spoiler)[There's also a sneaky sub-plot which is hinted at throughout the book which becomes very significant by the end leading readers to believe and look forward to a second book in this world. The undercurrent in the narrative was intriguing and kept me guessing (hide spoiler)] Eichenlaub offers up a futuristic world seen through the eyes of a character that is very "old school" cowboy. This book has a great narrative that is delightfully sarcastic. I enjoyed the way the story unfolds. (view spoiler)[There's also a sneaky sub-plot which is hinted at throughout the book which becomes very significant by the end leading readers to believe and look forward to a second book in this world. The undercurrent in the narrative was intriguing and kept me guessing (hide spoiler)] Eichenlaub offers up a futuristic world seen through the eyes of a character that is very "old school" cowboy. You have a relatable main character in an unfamiliar world which helps guide the reader through this dystopian-like future. There are lots of interesting tech in this world. I think a lot more will be explored if there is a book two. Eichenlaub's title character, J.D., while very cowboy-ish is also not your stereotypical cowboy. I appreciated the moments of vulnerability and growth that Eichenlaub explored with this character. I liked how the relationship between J.D. & Trish changed through the story also. I think she'll be an excellent character to explore in the future! There are a few things I did not like. One was a cigarette-smoking 11 year old. The other was the religious fanatical element of the story. There was a good amout of religious slamming and not a good character counterpoint to the fanaticism. I had hoped more Hopi would have come in to play, and I think it will if this becomes a series. However, I tire of crazy religious leaders who have clearly not read the New Testament or anything Jesus taught. Overall, Eichenlaub is a great storyteller. He masterfully laces subtle hints along the current of the main story to create a multi-layered plot structure. He creates unique characters and an interesting setting. I look forward to more from this author.

  26. 5 out of 5

    K. Lincoln

    Cyber-Westerns may not be an official genre (although Cherie Priest's alternate history Clockwork Century series touches on that, amongst other authors) Eichenlaub creates a rural, Texas society thrust back to frontier law days due to the disintegration of civilization. There was a civil war. J.D. Crow, the sheriff around these here parts, was on the "losing" side (although he claims they fought to a draw). Crow is mostly human, unlike many of the modded youngsters running around in gangs or on f Cyber-Westerns may not be an official genre (although Cherie Priest's alternate history Clockwork Century series touches on that, amongst other authors) Eichenlaub creates a rural, Texas society thrust back to frontier law days due to the disintegration of civilization. There was a civil war. J.D. Crow, the sheriff around these here parts, was on the "losing" side (although he claims they fought to a draw). Crow is mostly human, unlike many of the modded youngsters running around in gangs or on far-flung ranches. Courtesy of war-time trauma he sports a "black metal" arm and "nannies" (nanites) that keep him from getting too drunk-- a slight complication for a tough, old alcoholic. He's just trying to keep a little order in this lawless land, and suffer the unwanted addition of a new, city-bred deputy he suspects is there for political reasons. Then a rancher is found dead. And there's complaints about a new Preacher stirring up unwanted attention, and a Cincas Armas gang member causing trouble-- and part of the fun here is finding out how all those things connect. Crow's voice is pretty fun. He's weary, and wise, and philosophically obsessed with honor and determined to be a force against chaos. There's not quite enough time for my personal taste spent on him interacting with his deputies, and I got a little confused about some of the criminal plotting, as well as I kept mistaking a few minor characters for each other, but this is certainly a fun book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jason Nickey

    This book is an odd little tale. It is like an old western, only set in a futuristic world where Texas is it's own country, people drive hovercrafts, and technology pretty much runs the world. One thing I really liked about this book was that the main character JD, while flawed, is a good guy who tries to do right, but also a badass. I also liked that the author made the main character gay, but not in the common way. JD's sexuality is only mentioned a few times in the story, so it's not a focal This book is an odd little tale. It is like an old western, only set in a futuristic world where Texas is it's own country, people drive hovercrafts, and technology pretty much runs the world. One thing I really liked about this book was that the main character JD, while flawed, is a good guy who tries to do right, but also a badass. I also liked that the author made the main character gay, but not in the common way. JD's sexuality is only mentioned a few times in the story, so it's not a focal point, but he's also not made out to be a stereotype. This is a very creative story that I found to be very enjoyable and an easy read. Definitely recommended!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Green

    I joined Goodreads to get acquainted with some new authors, I was lucky enough to win this book. This author floored me with his idea of a futuristic time in the state of Texas. I guess you can recognize a real author when they come up with ideas like this one...very novel. I really liked the character, Jasper Davis Crow (JD). He is not perfect. He realizes his faults and, he is trying to do better. I love Anthony W. Eichenlaub's writing style. I can just "feel" the pace of the people in Texas a I joined Goodreads to get acquainted with some new authors, I was lucky enough to win this book. This author floored me with his idea of a futuristic time in the state of Texas. I guess you can recognize a real author when they come up with ideas like this one...very novel. I really liked the character, Jasper Davis Crow (JD). He is not perfect. He realizes his faults and, he is trying to do better. I love Anthony W. Eichenlaub's writing style. I can just "feel" the pace of the people in Texas as I was reading this story. After reading this story, I feel the need to investigate more of this author's books.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tony Wirt

    Justice in an Age of Metal and Men was a great introduction to Cyberpunk for me. It's fast paced and can be devoured quickly. The world the author built is a fascinating one, especially in terms of the high tech "mods" people (especially the bad guys) sported. I'm excited for other tales in the world. Justice in an Age of Metal and Men was a great introduction to Cyberpunk for me. It's fast paced and can be devoured quickly. The world the author built is a fascinating one, especially in terms of the high tech "mods" people (especially the bad guys) sported. I'm excited for other tales in the world.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rod Starcke

    This book is thoroughly entertaining. I especially liked the use of horticulture, material science and biology in the creation of his characters. The sheriff get beat up more often than Clint Eastwood in a spaghetti western.

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