counter create hit A Hallucinogenic Tea, Laced with Controversy: Ayahuasca in the Amazon and the United States - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

A Hallucinogenic Tea, Laced with Controversy: Ayahuasca in the Amazon and the United States

Availability: Ready to download

One country's sacrament is another's illicit drug, as officials in South America and the United States are well aware. For centuries, a hallucinogenic tea made from a giant vine native to the Amazonian rainforest has been taken as a religious sacrament across several cultures in South America. Many spiritual leaders, shamans, and their followers consider the tea and its ma One country's sacrament is another's illicit drug, as officials in South America and the United States are well aware. For centuries, a hallucinogenic tea made from a giant vine native to the Amazonian rainforest has been taken as a religious sacrament across several cultures in South America. Many spiritual leaders, shamans, and their followers consider the tea and its main component - ayahuasca - to be both enlightening and healing. In fact, ayahuasca (pronounced a-ja-was-ka) loosely translated means spirit vine. In this book, de Rios and Rumrrill take us inside the history and realm of, as well as the raging arguments about, the substance that seems a sacrament to some and a scourge to others. Their book includes text from the United Nations Convention on Psychotropic Substances and interviews with shamans in the Amazon. One country's sacrament is another's illicit drug, as officials in South America and the United States are well aware. For centuries, a hallucinogenic tea made from a giant vine native to the Amazonian rainforest has been taken as a religious sacrament across several cultures in South America. Many spiritual leaders, shamans, and their followers consider the tea and its main component - ayahuasca - to be both enlightening and healing. In fact, ayahuasca (pronounced a-ja-was-ka) loosely translated means spirit vine. Ayahuasca has moved into the United States, causing legal battles in the Supreme Court and rulings from the United Nations. Some U.S. church groups are using the hallucinogen in their ceremonies and have fought for government approval to do so. The sacrament has also drawn American drug tourists to South America to partake, say authors de Rios and Rumrrill. But they warn that these tourists are being put at risk by charlatans who are not true shamans or religious figures, just profiteers. In this book, de Rios and Rumrrill take us inside the history and realm of, as well as the raging arguments about, the substance that seems a sacrament to some and a scourge to others. Opponents fight its use even as U.S. scientists and psychologists continue investigations of whether ayahuasca has healing properties that might be put to conventional use for physical and mental health. This book includes text from the United Nations Convention on Psychotropic Substances and interviews with shamans in the Amazon.


Compare
Ads Banner

One country's sacrament is another's illicit drug, as officials in South America and the United States are well aware. For centuries, a hallucinogenic tea made from a giant vine native to the Amazonian rainforest has been taken as a religious sacrament across several cultures in South America. Many spiritual leaders, shamans, and their followers consider the tea and its ma One country's sacrament is another's illicit drug, as officials in South America and the United States are well aware. For centuries, a hallucinogenic tea made from a giant vine native to the Amazonian rainforest has been taken as a religious sacrament across several cultures in South America. Many spiritual leaders, shamans, and their followers consider the tea and its main component - ayahuasca - to be both enlightening and healing. In fact, ayahuasca (pronounced a-ja-was-ka) loosely translated means spirit vine. In this book, de Rios and Rumrrill take us inside the history and realm of, as well as the raging arguments about, the substance that seems a sacrament to some and a scourge to others. Their book includes text from the United Nations Convention on Psychotropic Substances and interviews with shamans in the Amazon. One country's sacrament is another's illicit drug, as officials in South America and the United States are well aware. For centuries, a hallucinogenic tea made from a giant vine native to the Amazonian rainforest has been taken as a religious sacrament across several cultures in South America. Many spiritual leaders, shamans, and their followers consider the tea and its main component - ayahuasca - to be both enlightening and healing. In fact, ayahuasca (pronounced a-ja-was-ka) loosely translated means spirit vine. Ayahuasca has moved into the United States, causing legal battles in the Supreme Court and rulings from the United Nations. Some U.S. church groups are using the hallucinogen in their ceremonies and have fought for government approval to do so. The sacrament has also drawn American drug tourists to South America to partake, say authors de Rios and Rumrrill. But they warn that these tourists are being put at risk by charlatans who are not true shamans or religious figures, just profiteers. In this book, de Rios and Rumrrill take us inside the history and realm of, as well as the raging arguments about, the substance that seems a sacrament to some and a scourge to others. Opponents fight its use even as U.S. scientists and psychologists continue investigations of whether ayahuasca has healing properties that might be put to conventional use for physical and mental health. This book includes text from the United Nations Convention on Psychotropic Substances and interviews with shamans in the Amazon.

32 review for A Hallucinogenic Tea, Laced with Controversy: Ayahuasca in the Amazon and the United States

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    A good academic and contemporary treatment of ayahuasca.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Roger Green

    In general, this is a very good book and I agree with many of its sentiments. However, there are points where source work is rather sloppy and minimal, especially concerning the RFRA and UDV discussion. I don't think the authors are trying to hide anything or being dubious in any way. I just wish they would point to more for further study.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brick ONeil

    A Hallucinogenic Tea, Laced with Controversy: Ayahuasca in the Amazon and the United States, 168 pages from Praeger Publishers (July 30, 2008). Authors MARLENE DOBKIN DE RIOS and ROGER RUMRRILL discuss Amazon Shamans (Ayahuascaros, among other terms that have slightly different meanings) use of a tea made from the Ayahuasca plant, native to the Amazon. There are few true Shamans left, according to the Shamans de Rios interviews for the book. Training takes two years and requires many hardships, s A Hallucinogenic Tea, Laced with Controversy: Ayahuasca in the Amazon and the United States, 168 pages from Praeger Publishers (July 30, 2008). Authors MARLENE DOBKIN DE RIOS and ROGER RUMRRILL discuss Amazon Shamans (Ayahuascaros, among other terms that have slightly different meanings) use of a tea made from the Ayahuasca plant, native to the Amazon. There are few true Shamans left, according to the Shamans de Rios interviews for the book. Training takes two years and requires many hardships, such as forays into the forrest, severe diets, celibacy: so much so, that the Amazon youth prefer city life to taking up tribal customs, such as Shamanism. That's not to say they don't produce their own brand of Shamanism to tourists, offering Ayahuasca Tea (without the proper prayers, chanting, etc) to tourists. This is called "Drug Tourism" and the authors detail what Drug Tourism is and how it is harming Tribal life and how it affects how the plant is disappearing from the Amazon. This is a great book that discusses the manners in which Shamans train, believe, go about their vocation, administer to local tribes (mostly women and children). With drinking the tea, a Shaman 'communicates' with spirits (not as we in the West describe them) then help whomever comes to him. In it's proper respect, Ayahuasca Tea helps the proper Shaman delve into the problem, thus helping his 'customer'. Improper use of the tea has skyrocketed, and many false Shamans have sprung up around the Countries. Countries don't seem to mind, as the 'drug tourism' brings in much needed capital. Although Shamanism is dying out, the religion it professes has spread to many Western and Industrialized Nations, including the United States. And there was the problem, according to the Drug Enforcement Agency here in the U.S. When the religion started, the U.S. placed the tea on their list of forbidden substances. After many years and lawsuits later, the religion won their right to use the tea for their services. The book is enjoyable, as the authors discuss conversations with Shamans, details religious rites, reasons for using the Hallucinogenic Tea, their use of psychology, biology, counseling, consultation of spirits, etc., the authors do repeat themselves quite often. Overall, I recommend this book to anyone interested in Cultural Anthropology, Shamanism, Amazonin Influences, Religions.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ciro

    Here are the facts. Don't expect anything radical or theoretical.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Geomaria

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tynan

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  8. 4 out of 5

    K

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Homan

  10. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tomáš Hrčka

  12. 5 out of 5

    Evgenia

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samantha McGuire (Mirror Bridge Books)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  15. 5 out of 5

    Josh Chambers

  16. 4 out of 5

    David

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eric Hutchison

  18. 5 out of 5

    Allan Cronin

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paola G.M.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sydney

  21. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  22. 5 out of 5

    Spectraz

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jet Ringo

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lily

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dhattūra

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marc-antoine Perreault

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bri

  28. 5 out of 5

    Steven Wooten Jr

  29. 5 out of 5

    C.J.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Derek

  31. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Monaghan

  32. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Leach

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.