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A Path to Peace: A Brief History of Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations and a Way Forward in the Middle East

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The “illuminating” (Los Angeles Times) answer to why Israel and Palestine’s attempts at negotiation have failed and a practical, “admirably measured” (The New York Times) roadmap for bringing peace to the Middle East—by an impartial American diplomat experienced in solving international conflicts. George Mitchell knows how to bring peace to troubled regions. He was the prim The “illuminating” (Los Angeles Times) answer to why Israel and Palestine’s attempts at negotiation have failed and a practical, “admirably measured” (The New York Times) roadmap for bringing peace to the Middle East—by an impartial American diplomat experienced in solving international conflicts. George Mitchell knows how to bring peace to troubled regions. He was the primary architect of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement for peace in Northern Ireland. But when he served as US Special Envoy for Middle East Peace from 2009 to 2011—working to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict—diplomacy did not prevail. Now, for the first time, Mitchell offers his insider account of how the Israelis and the Palestinians have progressed (and regressed) in their negotiations through the years and outlines the specific concessions each side must make to finally achieve lasting peace.


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The “illuminating” (Los Angeles Times) answer to why Israel and Palestine’s attempts at negotiation have failed and a practical, “admirably measured” (The New York Times) roadmap for bringing peace to the Middle East—by an impartial American diplomat experienced in solving international conflicts. George Mitchell knows how to bring peace to troubled regions. He was the prim The “illuminating” (Los Angeles Times) answer to why Israel and Palestine’s attempts at negotiation have failed and a practical, “admirably measured” (The New York Times) roadmap for bringing peace to the Middle East—by an impartial American diplomat experienced in solving international conflicts. George Mitchell knows how to bring peace to troubled regions. He was the primary architect of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement for peace in Northern Ireland. But when he served as US Special Envoy for Middle East Peace from 2009 to 2011—working to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict—diplomacy did not prevail. Now, for the first time, Mitchell offers his insider account of how the Israelis and the Palestinians have progressed (and regressed) in their negotiations through the years and outlines the specific concessions each side must make to finally achieve lasting peace.

30 review for A Path to Peace: A Brief History of Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations and a Way Forward in the Middle East

  1. 5 out of 5

    Parashar B.

    Some good information in here, but nothing groundbreaking since most of this is public knowledge at this point. It's a good summary if you are not familiar with the situation at all. The recommendations for our "next President" seem quaint given our current regime.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ray

    ​Former Senator George Mitchell is a widely respected peace negotiator, helping settle the long standing conflict in Northern Ireland, and having served as an intermediary in Israeli - Palestinian peace talks from 2009 - 2011. His book, "A Path to Peace", takes the reader through the history of the Israeli - Palestinian conflict over the past 70 years, talks about previous peace talks between the two, and then offers an outline for negotiating peace, based on the established step-by-step methods ​Former Senator George Mitchell is a widely respected peace negotiator, helping settle the long standing conflict in Northern Ireland, and having served as an intermediary in Israeli - Palestinian peace talks from 2009 - 2011. His book, "A Path to Peace", takes the reader through the history of the Israeli - Palestinian conflict over the past 70 years, talks about previous peace talks between the two, and then offers an outline for negotiating peace, based on the established step-by-step methods which proved successful in settling the longstanding dispute in Northern Ireland. Mitchell's peace plan would result in two States, side-by-side, one being the Israeli State, and the other being the Palestinian State. This has been the stated goal of the Palestinians and Arab Nations in the region, and has been endorsed by the U.S. and Israeli leaders. However, as the delays drag on, and peace talks get postponed, support for that two state solution is losing support among many Israeli leaders, and many Palestinians as well. Peace talks in the past typically fail, or fail to even begin, due to the continuing settlement activity by Jewish settlers, which is a red-line to the Palestinians, and failure of Palestinian leaders to begin direct negotiations without pre-conditions. Security is a main concern of Netanyahu, and boundaries for a Palestinian state a main concern of PNA leader Abbas. Mitchell envisioned the U.S. laying out a broad acceptable outline which would set a goal for, but not fully define boundaries for, a Palestinian State, which would call for a temporary end to settlement expansion into that envisioned territory, guarantee boundary security for Israel, and support the return of a number of refugees to return to the Palestinian state. The U.S. would be an essential partner in this effort, by guaranteeing Israel's security, along with NATO and other nations, and by creating an international fund to support returning refugees and settlers forced to relocate. However, my guess is that whatever Mitchell envisioned will not get started. Mitchell wrote his book just before the 2016 Presidential elections, not being sure who would become the new President. But his hopes were that Obama would lay out a general approach for peace, and the next President would continue to refine the plan with Israeli and Palestinian leaders. Disputes are created and continue by humans, and Mitchell feels that disputes can be resolved by humans. But that requires that they sit down and TALK. Mitchell feels that if a negotiator can meet with the leaders, and identify a take tiny, easy baby-step for one side, then take that to the other side and see if they'll make a reciprocal, tiny, easy baby-step in response, and then go back and forth, continuing the process, with the U.S. as guarantor, eventually the two side could gain trust and begin talking amongst themselves. But, it appears Mitchell will have to write a new book now. Following President Trump's decision to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to "the Jewish Capital of Jerusalem", Palestinian leaders no longer see the U.S. as a credible mediator in this conflict. ​ Many other Countries have already voiced concern that this declaration by the President would alienate Arab allies and further complicate prospects for a two-state solution, as evidenced by the December U.N. Security Council and General Council condemnations of this singular move. George Mitchell himself, ever the diplomat, simply called the President's declaration "premature and unwise". So, unless President Trump's peace envoy and son-in-law Jared Kushner can come up with a better plan, new negotiations by either party seem more unlikely in the near future, and things may have to get worse before they get better. For the curious, see Mitchell's short interview on the subject from early December here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxE_R...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    A useful primer that reflects George Mitchell's fair-mindedness.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ryan King

    Pretty decent and quick summary of actions in the Middle East and what it'll take for both Palestine and Israel to agree to peace.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cory Dankner

  6. 5 out of 5

    Briynne

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emory

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ryan D

  9. 5 out of 5

    Benay

  10. 5 out of 5

    Langston Morrison

  11. 4 out of 5

    Zhewen Fu

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Gardner

  14. 5 out of 5

    Constance F

  15. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Buley

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jack Kelly

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Coffin

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sabra

  19. 5 out of 5

    A Okeil

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leigh

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cait

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aniruddh Nerlekar

  23. 4 out of 5

    Craig MacFarlane

  24. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Victoroff

  27. 4 out of 5

    X

  28. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Corbett

  29. 4 out of 5

    AZ

  30. 4 out of 5

    Murray Goldenblatt

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