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Chicano Homeland: The Movement in East Los Angeles for Mexican American Power, Justice, and Equality

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Chicano Homeland tells the dynamic story of the movement for the rights of Mexican-Americans. Focusing on the Chicano movement at its epicenter in Los Angeles, author Louis R. Negrete brings to life the issues that triggered this wide-ranging civil rights movement - police brutality, institutionalized poverty, demands for better schools, opposition to the war in Vietnam, a Chicano Homeland tells the dynamic story of the movement for the rights of Mexican-Americans. Focusing on the Chicano movement at its epicenter in Los Angeles, author Louis R. Negrete brings to life the issues that triggered this wide-ranging civil rights movement - police brutality, institutionalized poverty, demands for better schools, opposition to the war in Vietnam, and defense of undocumented immigrants. He blends personal experiences and eyewitness accounts with stories of the many leaders, organizations, and successful political strategies. Negrete provides a vision of how a new generation of activists - who represent the largest minority voting block in the country --might revive this crucial human rights movement.


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Chicano Homeland tells the dynamic story of the movement for the rights of Mexican-Americans. Focusing on the Chicano movement at its epicenter in Los Angeles, author Louis R. Negrete brings to life the issues that triggered this wide-ranging civil rights movement - police brutality, institutionalized poverty, demands for better schools, opposition to the war in Vietnam, a Chicano Homeland tells the dynamic story of the movement for the rights of Mexican-Americans. Focusing on the Chicano movement at its epicenter in Los Angeles, author Louis R. Negrete brings to life the issues that triggered this wide-ranging civil rights movement - police brutality, institutionalized poverty, demands for better schools, opposition to the war in Vietnam, and defense of undocumented immigrants. He blends personal experiences and eyewitness accounts with stories of the many leaders, organizations, and successful political strategies. Negrete provides a vision of how a new generation of activists - who represent the largest minority voting block in the country --might revive this crucial human rights movement.

18 review for Chicano Homeland: The Movement in East Los Angeles for Mexican American Power, Justice, and Equality

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael M Clements

    Author was immersed in the stories highlighted in this valuable work. Important contribution to capturing political history of E L A over a span of decades. Useful for wide audience. Read and share!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Chicano Homeland is a Historical Nonfiction novel. It opens with a scene that catches you right in the feelings. Students refusing to go to class, unfair treatment because of their race and skin color. Police chasing them, though very ineffectively. Louis felt amazed at this, and at the time he served as Director of Project Head Start for the Council of Mexican American Affairs that was headquartered in Lincoln Heights. You find out that the students are hoping to promote the slogan “Walk Out Now Chicano Homeland is a Historical Nonfiction novel. It opens with a scene that catches you right in the feelings. Students refusing to go to class, unfair treatment because of their race and skin color. Police chasing them, though very ineffectively. Louis felt amazed at this, and at the time he served as Director of Project Head Start for the Council of Mexican American Affairs that was headquartered in Lincoln Heights. You find out that the students are hoping to promote the slogan “Walk Out Now or Drop Out Tomorrow” meaning that they knew protest was necessary to force the schools to teach. All these students were wanting was in fact, better schools. The students called their strike “walkouts” or “blowouts” However, the walkouts only enraged school officials. They summoned the police who arrested several students on the picket line. During this time, Louis observed a young male absorb a blow from a police baton while he stood between a student protester and an angry policeman in front of Roosevelt High School in Boyle Heights. Roots of Activism Activists traces the origins of the Chicano Movement to Aztec resistance against the Spanish invasion of Mexico. Some said the movement started over resentment from the loss of the U.S. Southwest after the U.S. War with Mexico, while others pointed to a legacy of the Mexican Revolution of 1910. However, the roots of the movement can also be traced to a series of events that were closer to home. — In Los Angeles during World War II, U.S. sailors assisted by police officers attacked young Chicanos on the streets in downtown Los Angeles, Lincoln Heights, and Watts. The assaults in June 1943, became known in the media as the Zoot Suit Riots. Of course, the media blamed Chicano youth or street confrontations with the sailors, but in truth, the confrontations should have been called “The Sailor Riots.” So many young people were attacked and abused during this time. Media, police officers and other school officials mainly looked over it. No one wanted to acknowledge what was going on during this horrible time. Louis shares how he also experienced abuse as a teenager growing up in Watts. He had an asthma attack at his home which caused him to fall and hit his head. He managed to walk out his front door completely unseen. He was in a daze and having difficulty breathing. Two police officers stopped him and began to ask him questions which he couldn’t properly answer since he was dazed. Instead of helping him out they took him into custody, where later his parents picked him up off a cot at the police station. He had bruises on his chest and back, but none on his face. The following day his parents noticed a police car pass their house slowly which caused them to fear for Louis’ safety. His parents then rented him a room across town and he stayed there for weeks, taking the bus to school so he could attend his classes. He returned home after the police car stopped cruising in front of their house. Louis says that “Inspite of this, I respect police officers, but understand a lingering community mistrust of law enforcement” A quote in the book really stood out to me, “To create our future, it is important to know and understand our history,” which I couldn’t agree with more. This also made me think of the quote “Those who fail to learn from history, are destined to repeat it.” I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I loved learning about the movement and how so many fought to overcome the racial discrimination that was so prominent in Los Angeles. It was heartbreaking to read about the young people who only wanted action taken for better schools to just lose their lives over it. I give this book a rating of 5/5 stars. I’m grateful to have been given the chance to read and review it as part of Pump Up Your Book Blog Tours

  3. 5 out of 5

    Diego Negrete

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marguerita

  6. 5 out of 5

    Irene

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kitzia

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kim Marie

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gloriaberry

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

  12. 5 out of 5

    Blue Truong

  13. 4 out of 5

    Venere Di Tella

  14. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

  15. 5 out of 5

    Reno Ibarra

  16. 4 out of 5

    NENA VANESSA ESPINOSA

  17. 4 out of 5

    Yesenia Gutierrez

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Chavez

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