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For the Love of Meat: Nine Illustrated Stories

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FOR THE LOVE OF MEAT combines whimsical and surreal illustrations with engaging, intimate encounters that explore the depths of human experience. Unique and diverse in setting, with touches of magical-realism, these nine stories will tug at the wandering, romantic heart, setting it delightfully ablaze. In Wander the Desert, Sister Aurelia, a nun from the early 20th century, FOR THE LOVE OF MEAT combines whimsical and surreal illustrations with engaging, intimate encounters that explore the depths of human experience. Unique and diverse in setting, with touches of magical-realism, these nine stories will tug at the wandering, romantic heart, setting it delightfully ablaze. In Wander the Desert, Sister Aurelia, a nun from the early 20th century, finds herself stranded in the Mexican desert with nothing but a few cobs of corn and a stray horse who becomes her faithful companion. In Stumble and Fall, we meet Dara, a young Londoner hungry for adventure who, unwilling to settle for the safety and comfort of home, travels to Vancouver, city of immigrants, where a handsome stranger entices her to take a leap into the unknown. The Kid takes us to Granada, Spain, to the fix-it shop of Rubén, and his encounters with a young traveler, whose flirtations spark memories of a past love that both haunts and hinders him. The Two explores the tender bond between two young cousins, growing up in 1940s Philadelphia, who are as inseparable as light and shadow. Jenny Jaeckel’s compelling storytelling takes us across the world and through the ages, with remarkable insight and soul-moving moments Her language, imagery and attention to detail plunge the reader into these memorable lives, soaking us in tales of adventure, courage, love, loss, longing and all the hope in between.


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FOR THE LOVE OF MEAT combines whimsical and surreal illustrations with engaging, intimate encounters that explore the depths of human experience. Unique and diverse in setting, with touches of magical-realism, these nine stories will tug at the wandering, romantic heart, setting it delightfully ablaze. In Wander the Desert, Sister Aurelia, a nun from the early 20th century, FOR THE LOVE OF MEAT combines whimsical and surreal illustrations with engaging, intimate encounters that explore the depths of human experience. Unique and diverse in setting, with touches of magical-realism, these nine stories will tug at the wandering, romantic heart, setting it delightfully ablaze. In Wander the Desert, Sister Aurelia, a nun from the early 20th century, finds herself stranded in the Mexican desert with nothing but a few cobs of corn and a stray horse who becomes her faithful companion. In Stumble and Fall, we meet Dara, a young Londoner hungry for adventure who, unwilling to settle for the safety and comfort of home, travels to Vancouver, city of immigrants, where a handsome stranger entices her to take a leap into the unknown. The Kid takes us to Granada, Spain, to the fix-it shop of Rubén, and his encounters with a young traveler, whose flirtations spark memories of a past love that both haunts and hinders him. The Two explores the tender bond between two young cousins, growing up in 1940s Philadelphia, who are as inseparable as light and shadow. Jenny Jaeckel’s compelling storytelling takes us across the world and through the ages, with remarkable insight and soul-moving moments Her language, imagery and attention to detail plunge the reader into these memorable lives, soaking us in tales of adventure, courage, love, loss, longing and all the hope in between.

30 review for For the Love of Meat: Nine Illustrated Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    Barry Bash

    Great short stores telling of experiences and glimpse into people's lives

  2. 5 out of 5

    Zoe's Human

    A collection of shorts which seize moments of life and display a glimpse of the human soul. The stories tend to live on the the boundary of that which is completely realistic and faintly surreal at the same time. The illustrations perplex me. If they have some connection to the stories, it is simply to subtle for me. I received a complimentary copy of this book through the Goodreads First Reads program.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Debee Sue

    Awesome book. I just couldn't put it down. I won this in a Goodreads giveaway and already searching for more books by Jenny Jaeckel. Wonderful.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    I really enjoyed these short stories. They are deeply personal and diverse, taking us all over the globe and to different cultures. I was actually impressed with how much characterization Jaeckel was able to achieve in such short stories. They are short but satisfying (with the exception of Wander the Desert, which I really loved but that ending was way too abrupt) glimpses of transcending moments in the lives of normal people. A very slight magical touch helps to show the inner feelings of a fe I really enjoyed these short stories. They are deeply personal and diverse, taking us all over the globe and to different cultures. I was actually impressed with how much characterization Jaeckel was able to achieve in such short stories. They are short but satisfying (with the exception of Wander the Desert, which I really loved but that ending was way too abrupt) glimpses of transcending moments in the lives of normal people. A very slight magical touch helps to show the inner feelings of a few of our narrators. I was completely invested in most of them, with only a few exceptions. There are two stories that are more like first person rambling conversations (The Incident and the book's namesake, For the Love of Meat); I didn’t really get the point of them and took nothing away from them in the end. The illustrations that are speckled throughout the stories were a bit strange, to be honest; most of them had nothing to do with the stories, I felt, and only served to take up space. There are only a few that seemed to actually connect with the stories, and those are the ones I appreciated most. I think it would have been better to stick with a single picture for each title page- ones with meaning to the story, like the winged horse or the intricate picture of the mystical bird. Overall, The Kid and The Two were my favorites. Such depth of character and sadness, with just a little bit of hope. To me, they are the most memorable of the stories in this collection. Many thanks to goodreads and the publisher for providing me with an ARC, which I won through a goodreads giveaway, in return for my honest opinion.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    First, I should start by saying this was a Goodreads giveaway. Ordinarily, I would probably not give a book of short stories a second glance, preferring to get lost in a good, juicy, long novel! But, I was quite surprised (despite the distasteful title to a vegetarian...ha ha) by just how much I did enjoy the book. I couldn’t wait to pick the book up and start another little tale. Each story was completely different from the next. My favorite was “Wander the Desert”. We have a lot of house guests First, I should start by saying this was a Goodreads giveaway. Ordinarily, I would probably not give a book of short stories a second glance, preferring to get lost in a good, juicy, long novel! But, I was quite surprised (despite the distasteful title to a vegetarian...ha ha) by just how much I did enjoy the book. I couldn’t wait to pick the book up and start another little tale. Each story was completely different from the next. My favorite was “Wander the Desert”. We have a lot of house guests come to stay. This is the perfect little book to leave on a nightstand or next to a big, comfy chair. So now I appreciate a little book of well written short stories. I would rate his 3.5 stars if I could.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I place this clearly in the genre of literary fiction. Each narrative short tale expresses an experience in human emotion. Many have traits in common, not only between the protagonists, but also with the supporting characters. There is despair, yet hope, in trying and seeming to fail, yet not giving up. With wry humor at times, the author draws you into each experience. She sets scenes very effectively. Even if you do not have a guilt inducing Jewish mother or have not heard Yiddish spoken quickly I place this clearly in the genre of literary fiction. Each narrative short tale expresses an experience in human emotion. Many have traits in common, not only between the protagonists, but also with the supporting characters. There is despair, yet hope, in trying and seeming to fail, yet not giving up. With wry humor at times, the author draws you into each experience. She sets scenes very effectively. Even if you do not have a guilt inducing Jewish mother or have not heard Yiddish spoken quickly and judgmentally, you will get the feel of one particularly well written exchange. I accepted a copy of this book for an unbiased review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Toni Laliberte

    I really enjoyed these nine stories! The author has a way with words, that's for sure. A couple of the stories, really touched my heart. She hit on human emotions, relationships and self worth. I like how the stories were set all over the world, in different times. I think my favorite was the last one, Me'Me'. It's about mothers and who doesn't love a good story about mothers?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kirstie

    This was a quick, fun read... I'm a big fan of quirky short story collections and this one fit the bill. The little illustrations were a bonus! If you like the funky short story, give this a go... Am looking forward to hearing more from Jenny Jaeckel.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

    I won an advanced reading copy of this book during a Goodreads giveaway. I am under no obligation to leave a review or rating and do so voluntarily. So that others may also enjoy this book, I am paying it forward by donating it a local library.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I liked the stories in this book. They were all tied together with a religious/spiritual theme. I didn't care for the illustrations. In some cases they seemed to have nothing to do with the story. I received this book in a Goodreads giveaway.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Renee Morgan

    This book was a very engaging, easy read. I enjoyed the short stories and there was a good variety of stories.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mayhew8

    Very good book that I would recommend to others. The short stories make it a faster read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Barry Payne

    I enjoyed the stories and the meaning of most 0f them, but I was left hanging on some of them because the endings were so vague. Barry

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    Not really my type of book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    R.K. Cowles

    3 1/2 stars

  16. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Wade

    I haven't read a lot of short story books. This is the first book I have read by Jenny Jaeckel. I enjoyed most of the stories in the collection. There were a couple where I was hoping for more of the story when it ended. I did enjoy the illustrations through out the book related to the stories.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gretchen

    For the Love of Meat is a compilation of nine different stories spread across a variety of topics, set in different years and different places around the world. The title piece was amusing, but it wasn't my favorite. I liked The Kid, and I really enjoyed The Teteriv, with its tale of clandestine love. One of my favorites was actually Stumble and Fall, just because I identified so well with the main character and her love of travel.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ally

    Jenny Jaeckel's FOR THE LOVE OF MEAT presents the reader with nine short stories, each with a nuanced perspective on the human condition. Each story is introduced with a title page containing the name, the year and location of the setting, and a small illustration that relates to the story in some way. For example, in "Wander the Desert", the title page features a drawing of a piece of luggage. In the course of the story, the main character becomes separated from her luggage while on a trip in t Jenny Jaeckel's FOR THE LOVE OF MEAT presents the reader with nine short stories, each with a nuanced perspective on the human condition. Each story is introduced with a title page containing the name, the year and location of the setting, and a small illustration that relates to the story in some way. For example, in "Wander the Desert", the title page features a drawing of a piece of luggage. In the course of the story, the main character becomes separated from her luggage while on a trip in the Mexican desert. There are also illustrations throughout the pages of the collection, all of are reminiscent of cave drawings from ancient human civilizations. Birds, llamas gazing at telephone poles, plants, a record player, a dress. The illustrations appear, sometimes repeating from one story to another, as a way to bind the collection together and to demonstrate the similarities between individuals from different times and cultures. A thematic thread that connected many of the stories was that of movement. Characters relocated to a new locale, experienced some kind of conflict or hardship, and had to overcome it. In "The Incident", a lawyer from Paris becomes a Buddhist monk and moves to a monastery outside of Bordeaux. His Buddhist principles are challenged by the frustrations of dealing with the French bureaucracy to obtain a needed permit. In "Stumble and Fall" a woman moves to Canada for a job that falls through, leaving her to scramble to find a job and a place to live until her visa expires. Other stories shared a connection in how they addressed racism. There is a brief history of the Haitian slave trade in "Meme", told through the eyes of one of the longest-living women in her community. "The Two" explores the friendship between two young black girls in mid-twentieth century Philadelphia, and the toll it takes on their families when one of the girls becomes seriously ill. There are instances of brutal action taken by white people against those who are darker skinned, but also of deep humanity and compassion. Religion was a strong component in many of the stories as well. The religions themselves differ - Buddhism, Catholicism, Protestantism, Judiasm, and Muslim faiths are all mentioned - and the ways that characters interact with the religions are quite different. Some are strong adherents to religious customs and principles, while others actively turn away from the dogma. The consequences of these actions seem to be genuinely of the characters' own decision making. It never feels as though the author is trying to make a "religious point" through these situations, which is refreshing. There was a disjointedness to the collection that affected the reading experience negatively for me. Some of the stories did a fantastic job of evoking authentic emotions through the characters and settings. "Stumble and Fall" and "The Teteriv" are excellent examples of this. I was moved by the characters, felt a strong connection to them, and found myself completely immersed in their world. However, there were other stories that fell completely flat for me, mainly "For the Love of Meat", Up on a Mountian", and "The Two". These stories would have benefited from more time spent describing the scenes, and less time spent summarizing. When an author chooses to "tell" instead of "show", I am no longer engaged in the reading experience. The disconnect that I occasionally felt was the main reason that I didn't love this collection of short stories. Although, for me, it wasn't perfect, I found much to enjoy about FOR THE LOVE OF MEAT. It tackles many different time periods, social and cultural norms, and religious practices. It truly speaks to what makes us human, and what connects and separates us from each other.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Bender

    Nice short stories that only take a couple of minutes to read

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gayle Pace

    MY THOUGHTS The author gives the reader various tastes of time periods and places. It's like taking an Atlas, closing your eyes and pointing to a place on the map. Could be anywhere and at any time. The author didn't spare the detailed descriptions of the characters and places. You are there, traveling throughout different times and places. I especially liked feeling the ice cold snow that the sled dogs felt under their feet. As the reader, you almost wanted a camera when you were traveling to ta MY THOUGHTS The author gives the reader various tastes of time periods and places. It's like taking an Atlas, closing your eyes and pointing to a place on the map. Could be anywhere and at any time. The author didn't spare the detailed descriptions of the characters and places. You are there, traveling throughout different times and places. I especially liked feeling the ice cold snow that the sled dogs felt under their feet. As the reader, you almost wanted a camera when you were traveling to take pictures for your album. I love the romantic parts. They bring out the emotions in your heart. For you as the reader, every daydream about roaming, just taking off and going where your heart leads you, this book let's you do that. The peeks of the character's lives is fleeting but bits and pieces stay with you after you've finished the book. The author leads you through a variety of feelings from smiling, sometimes a little sad, reflective and sometimes a look into a "what if" world. The stories are written with loving care and have such a personal touch to them. If you are a short story lover, this book will give you more than most short story books. You get to travel the globe with many different people, from young, elderly, male, female, different ethnics, each with their own story. I feel the title, FOR THE LOVE OF MEAT, means loving the substance of what you see and feel. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the author, Jenny Jaeckel and PUYB in exchange for my unbiased and honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    The stories in this collection offer a brief glimpse into people's lives that span both time and place. The Teteriv takes place in 15th century Poland while other stories like The Kid (Grenada, Spain in 1995) and For the Love of Meat (Los Angeles, CA in 1981) are much more contemporary. As the book's summary states, Jaeckel's collection of short stories explore human experience through narrations that although short and often abrupt, are very personal. While each story may connect through this on The stories in this collection offer a brief glimpse into people's lives that span both time and place. The Teteriv takes place in 15th century Poland while other stories like The Kid (Grenada, Spain in 1995) and For the Love of Meat (Los Angeles, CA in 1981) are much more contemporary. As the book's summary states, Jaeckel's collection of short stories explore human experience through narrations that although short and often abrupt, are very personal. While each story may connect through this one specific theme, Jaeckel manages to tell nine unique tales and so there is definitely a strong sense of diversity when reading this collection. While I enjoyed all nine stories, Stumble and Fall really stood out from all the others to me, most likely because I can relate to the character's wanderlust and longing for change. Because of the vast span of time and location that Jaeckel writes about within this collection, it's easy for the reader to find a particular storyline to connect to, and because of how diverse each short story is, it's no wonder that I was able to find one specific experience that I could feel I related to. If this was part of Jaeckel's intent when writing this collection, she clearly achieved her goal!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Danny

    Is it magic realism or slice of life? Historical fiction or contemporary coming-of-age tale? Romance, or sociological critique? Salinger, Lispector, or Coelho? “For the love of meat” is all of these things and more. While it may be difficult to pin a genre label on Jaeckel’s work, it is perhaps more useful to say that the theme binding these short stories together is contemporary humanism. Blending narratives across time, geography, genre, and (arguably) planes of existence is no small feat, and Is it magic realism or slice of life? Historical fiction or contemporary coming-of-age tale? Romance, or sociological critique? Salinger, Lispector, or Coelho? “For the love of meat” is all of these things and more. While it may be difficult to pin a genre label on Jaeckel’s work, it is perhaps more useful to say that the theme binding these short stories together is contemporary humanism. Blending narratives across time, geography, genre, and (arguably) planes of existence is no small feat, and the effect is that these brief glimpses into the complex and unique lives of many individuals cohere to form a richly varied human context that gives each individual story greater significance. In the same way that when we as individuals open our minds to the lives and experiences of others, we gain a deeper understanding of ourselves. To me, this is the goal of all great art, so to experience a work that acknowledges empathy and social intelligence as a gateway to happiness, by virtue of its form, is a powerful experience. In our personal quest for understanding, Jaeckel leads us on a journey through time and space to look outside ourselves for the answer.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    I received this book as part of the Goodreads First Reads program in exchange for an honest review. This is a very short book, and I was able to read all of the stories in one day. I was originally worried that there would be a religious undertone to all of the stories, as the first two have characters that are in religious orders. I was pleasantly surprised to find I was wrong. While all of the stories were well written, my two favorite were "The Teteriv," and "The Two." The first is a host or I received this book as part of the Goodreads First Reads program in exchange for an honest review. This is a very short book, and I was able to read all of the stories in one day. I was originally worried that there would be a religious undertone to all of the stories, as the first two have characters that are in religious orders. I was pleasantly surprised to find I was wrong. While all of the stories were well written, my two favorite were "The Teteriv," and "The Two." The first is a host or call romance between a lady-in-waiting, and a rake." The second is about cousins who share an special bond, and what happens when one of them becomes deathly ill. Each story takes place in a different time period in a different part of the world, which makes each of them more interesting. The pictures in the book were rather dixappointing, and served no purpose. None of them had anything to do with the story being narrated. If anything, I feel they were used to make the book bigger than it really is, and seems like an afterthought. While I would read this author again, I don't think I will be going out of my way to find her books. It was a good form of distraction for an afternoon.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This delightful collection of short stories traverses both time and the globe. Spanning from 1570 to 2000 and from Poland to California, Jaeckel’s narratives take readers not on nine small journeys but on one long one. With a hint of magic and an abundance of love, each story shows an important part of the human condition. Jaeckel’s illustrations are beautiful in their simplicity, enhanced by the stark contrast of black ink on white paper. The illustrations are well placed and only serve to enha This delightful collection of short stories traverses both time and the globe. Spanning from 1570 to 2000 and from Poland to California, Jaeckel’s narratives take readers not on nine small journeys but on one long one. With a hint of magic and an abundance of love, each story shows an important part of the human condition. Jaeckel’s illustrations are beautiful in their simplicity, enhanced by the stark contrast of black ink on white paper. The illustrations are well placed and only serve to enhance the narrative. Only a few have the possibility of detracting from it. From supernatural occurrences at a monastery in the South of France, to a dry desert in Mexico, to Vancouver, to Los Angeles and Berkeley and Spain. To 14th century Poland, the racially-tense Philadelphia of the 1970’s, and Haiti, these stories will have something to engage any reader. With a touch of history, one of contemporary, and a dash of magic, Jaeckel’s stories are some that you will not soon forget.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Booth

    So I received an early reviewer copy--which means I went in with no expectations. The thing is, I applaud the idea (illustrated short stories), but the execution just felt halfway there. Let's start with the stories. There were some really good ones. Really. But then they would just abruptly end (like Wander in Desert). Any good fiction, including short stories, should leave you wanting but not unsatisfied. Unfortunately, everything in this book left me wanting. I think the most complete story of So I received an early reviewer copy--which means I went in with no expectations. The thing is, I applaud the idea (illustrated short stories), but the execution just felt halfway there. Let's start with the stories. There were some really good ones. Really. But then they would just abruptly end (like Wander in Desert). Any good fiction, including short stories, should leave you wanting but not unsatisfied. Unfortunately, everything in this book left me wanting. I think the most complete story of the collection was The Two. The illustrations were also... well they felt tacked on. I realize I'm biased living with an illustrator, but I expected them to at least compliment or add something. They didn't do that and they weren't particularly good. Ultimately, I actually would recommend giving this book a shot if it sounds like your thing. There are some great moments and I appreciate some of the leaps she tried to make with magical realism and perspective.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marcus

    I enjoyed reading the book, even though many of the tales felt like you were only seeing a snapshot of a much larger story. The description throughout the book was a pleasure to read, suggestive of an author who enjoys 'people watching'. Something about the style of writing immediately reminded me of Gabriel García Márquez' One Hundred Years of Solitude and I'm left with a similar feeling at the end of this book - as though I haven't quite grasped something - a future reading of the book may well I enjoyed reading the book, even though many of the tales felt like you were only seeing a snapshot of a much larger story. The description throughout the book was a pleasure to read, suggestive of an author who enjoys 'people watching'. Something about the style of writing immediately reminded me of Gabriel García Márquez' One Hundred Years of Solitude and I'm left with a similar feeling at the end of this book - as though I haven't quite grasped something - a future reading of the book may well shed new light. I liked the drawings in the book but often felt these were completely out of context with the text and, in my opinion, could be left out of the book without detracting from the tales - even though the book refers to nine illustrated stories... I would certainly recommend the book and I would be very interested to read some longer works by Jenny Jaeckel. I received a free copy of this book from LibraryThing in exchange for a review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Note: I received this book free from a GoodReads giveaway. I enjoyed these stories and read two a night before bed. Though the book is listed as 155 pages, when you don't count the blank pages, the full-page illustrations and the story title pages, it's more like 120 pages of story content. Stories are set all over the world and often place familiar characters in unfamiliar situations. (A nun abandoned in the Mexican desert, a monk in charge of a construction project). I though Jenny Jaeckel did Note: I received this book free from a GoodReads giveaway. I enjoyed these stories and read two a night before bed. Though the book is listed as 155 pages, when you don't count the blank pages, the full-page illustrations and the story title pages, it's more like 120 pages of story content. Stories are set all over the world and often place familiar characters in unfamiliar situations. (A nun abandoned in the Mexican desert, a monk in charge of a construction project). I though Jenny Jaeckel did a wonderful job of letting me 'see' the locale of each story - and does so without long passages devoted to setting the scene. With writing that sometimes feels more poetry than prose, Jaeckel has given the readers a wonderful collection of characters.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

    For the Love of Meat is a compilation of short stories that cover a range of themes. Each was set in a very different place, and sometimes a different time, with very unique characters. My two personal favorites were Stumble and Fall and the Teteriv. In the first, a girl is inspired to travel and live abroad just for the sake of the experience; she was stuck in a rut and the idea of traveling was calling to her. I've heard that call, and lived in different places, and I love to travel so the sto For the Love of Meat is a compilation of short stories that cover a range of themes. Each was set in a very different place, and sometimes a different time, with very unique characters. My two personal favorites were Stumble and Fall and the Teteriv. In the first, a girl is inspired to travel and live abroad just for the sake of the experience; she was stuck in a rut and the idea of traveling was calling to her. I've heard that call, and lived in different places, and I love to travel so the story definitely spoke to me. The Teteriv is set in a different century, in Poland, and it was just so different from the others and I enjoyed reading it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    I received a copy of this book from a Goodreads giveaway, and I'm glad I did. It's not the type of book I would normally purchase, and without the giveaway I would have missed out. There were some pleasant finds tucked in this little collection. There were also a few that felt a bit unfinished, but not terribly so. The illustrations did not seem connected to the stories in any way, but were an interesting touch none the less. Overall, I would be more likely to read other works by this Author aft I received a copy of this book from a Goodreads giveaway, and I'm glad I did. It's not the type of book I would normally purchase, and without the giveaway I would have missed out. There were some pleasant finds tucked in this little collection. There were also a few that felt a bit unfinished, but not terribly so. The illustrations did not seem connected to the stories in any way, but were an interesting touch none the less. Overall, I would be more likely to read other works by this Author after having read this one.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rich Wagner

    This a diverse collection of short stories.They literally take you across time and geography.The stories for the most part are engaging but end abruptly often making me long for more.It's almost like you want to spend more time in these worlds and people.There is an abundance which is good but often seems disconnected from the actual story and thus at times distracts. Overall a pleasant collection. ##### I won this book through goodreads first reads in exchange for an unbiased review. #####

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