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Anne Hereford

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First published in 1867, Anne Hereford is the story of murder, scandal, and misunderstandings in an aristocratic country house, told from the point of view of an orphaned ten-year-old. Its setting and viewpoint have led to natural comparisons with Jane Eyre, but it is Jane Eyre shot through with scandal and sensation -- the kind of book that might have appealed to the firs First published in 1867, Anne Hereford is the story of murder, scandal, and misunderstandings in an aristocratic country house, told from the point of view of an orphaned ten-year-old. Its setting and viewpoint have led to natural comparisons with Jane Eyre, but it is Jane Eyre shot through with scandal and sensation -- the kind of book that might have appealed to the first Mrs. Rochester. Despite its antiquated wills, inheritances, shotguns, and other paraphernalia, the novel is almost entirely accessible by modern readers -- with perhaps one exception. The reader should keep in mind that the phrase "make love to" denoted harmless flirting or praise in Victorian parlance. Thus when Selina urges, "Anne, come forward, and let Mr. Heneage make love to you. It is a pastime he favors," nothing sinister is implied. --Martha Bayless


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First published in 1867, Anne Hereford is the story of murder, scandal, and misunderstandings in an aristocratic country house, told from the point of view of an orphaned ten-year-old. Its setting and viewpoint have led to natural comparisons with Jane Eyre, but it is Jane Eyre shot through with scandal and sensation -- the kind of book that might have appealed to the firs First published in 1867, Anne Hereford is the story of murder, scandal, and misunderstandings in an aristocratic country house, told from the point of view of an orphaned ten-year-old. Its setting and viewpoint have led to natural comparisons with Jane Eyre, but it is Jane Eyre shot through with scandal and sensation -- the kind of book that might have appealed to the first Mrs. Rochester. Despite its antiquated wills, inheritances, shotguns, and other paraphernalia, the novel is almost entirely accessible by modern readers -- with perhaps one exception. The reader should keep in mind that the phrase "make love to" denoted harmless flirting or praise in Victorian parlance. Thus when Selina urges, "Anne, come forward, and let Mr. Heneage make love to you. It is a pastime he favors," nothing sinister is implied. --Martha Bayless

30 review for Anne Hereford

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    We’re not in Cranford anymore. What a page turner! I’m not sure that it’s great literature but it delivers on entertainment. It’s a sensationalist book; think Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s “Lady Audley’s Secret and Wilkie Collin’s “The Woman in White”; think gothic English country mansions, girl’s boarding schools, the dichotomy between the classes, candle light, swishing skirts and most of all many unanswered mysteries which our innocent heroine must suss out. There are also mean step uncles, gypsies We’re not in Cranford anymore. What a page turner! I’m not sure that it’s great literature but it delivers on entertainment. It’s a sensationalist book; think Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s “Lady Audley’s Secret and Wilkie Collin’s “The Woman in White”; think gothic English country mansions, girl’s boarding schools, the dichotomy between the classes, candle light, swishing skirts and most of all many unanswered mysteries which our innocent heroine must suss out. There are also mean step uncles, gypsies, bolting horses, orphans, sudden deaths, locked doors, strange messages and ghosts!!! Nothing and no one are who they seem and it’s hard to know who to trust yet somehow love blossoms…..of course. Suspend belief as you step into this book and prepare for a few sleepless nights. I wish more of Wood’s books were readily available.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carm9n

    My impressions here, http://carmenyamigos.blogspot.com.es/... My impressions here, http://carmenyamigos.blogspot.com.es/...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    Loved this book! Nowhere near as melodramatic as the gloriously daft 'East Lynne', the story has all the elements you'd expect from a Victorian sensation novel (a murder, a wicked uncle, shenanigans with inheritances and wills, a lonely penniless orphan forced into becoming a governess, big houses with secrets and possibly a mad person or two in the attic). Lots of parallels with 'Jane Eyre' can be drawn, which in itself makes it interesting, but if anything Anne Hereford is a more believable an Loved this book! Nowhere near as melodramatic as the gloriously daft 'East Lynne', the story has all the elements you'd expect from a Victorian sensation novel (a murder, a wicked uncle, shenanigans with inheritances and wills, a lonely penniless orphan forced into becoming a governess, big houses with secrets and possibly a mad person or two in the attic). Lots of parallels with 'Jane Eyre' can be drawn, which in itself makes it interesting, but if anything Anne Hereford is a more believable and likeable heroine.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Susannah

    Such a fun piece of fluff, my type of "beach read!" This is another great page-turner from the prolific 1860s author, Mrs Ellen Wood, and it is a story told in overheard conversations, of ghosts and missing titles and strangers in the night. I may have enjoyed this more than East Lynne. I wanted to shake our Anne into her senses but of course then there would be no story.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Please note that because of Ellen Wood's pen name Mrs Henry Wood here on Good Reads there are multiple editions of this story and you may find other reviews under other editions which have not been combined with this one. (I have requested that a GR SuperLibrarian tidy up the cataloguing of this title as it is a bit of a mess!) I have also cross posted this review with a compilation edition of Ellen Wood's works. Like Jane Austen, Ellen Wood was interested in marriage, and she has some interesti Please note that because of Ellen Wood's pen name Mrs Henry Wood here on Good Reads there are multiple editions of this story and you may find other reviews under other editions which have not been combined with this one. (I have requested that a GR SuperLibrarian tidy up the cataloguing of this title as it is a bit of a mess!) I have also cross posted this review with a compilation edition of Ellen Wood's works. Like Jane Austen, Ellen Wood was interested in marriage, and she has some interesting observations to make. As we know from any reading of any 19th century British classics, there were rigid rules about marriage and inheritance, and society was strictly hierarchical. Despite differences in wealth, Jane Austen’s heroines marry within their class. So too does the heroine in Jane Eyre: Jane gets her man because although a lowly governess, she is a lady. Margaret Hale, in Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South is the only 19th century heroine I know of, who marries down into a different class because she has met her intellectual equal. In Anne Hereford one of the women has married for love ‘down’ into ‘trade’ - but Anne (who despite being a penniless orphan of course is a lady) marries within her class, as we always knew she would. Despite this obeisance to the rules of 19th century society, there are in Anne Hereford some interesting threads around marriage: Marrying in haste and repenting at leisure; Marrying someone for love, who doesn’t really love you Marrying ‘up’ and marrying ‘down’ Status in society being rigid until you marry ‘down’ into ‘trade’ and then it’s quite flexible enough to not only destroy the social position of a lady but also that of her children forevermore Marrying someone from another culture (OMG a French husband!!) To read the rest of my review please visit http://anzlitlovers.wordpress.com/201...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Moppet

    Jane Eyre and Villette meet The Mysteries of Udolpho in this 1867 page-turner by the mistress of sensation fiction, Mrs. Henry Wood. Perhaps in conscious imitation of the Brontes, and in contrast to her other works, Mrs. Wood uses the first person viewpoint, not with complete success. Anne, an orphan of good family forced to get a living as a governess, tells her own story - until the final few chapters, when she starts telling everyone else's as well - that is, recounting various scenes which s Jane Eyre and Villette meet The Mysteries of Udolpho in this 1867 page-turner by the mistress of sensation fiction, Mrs. Henry Wood. Perhaps in conscious imitation of the Brontes, and in contrast to her other works, Mrs. Wood uses the first person viewpoint, not with complete success. Anne, an orphan of good family forced to get a living as a governess, tells her own story - until the final few chapters, when she starts telling everyone else's as well - that is, recounting various scenes which she did not personally witness, but which were found necessary to wind up the plot. There's a ghost (but not really), a murder (but not really) and a romance (of course), not to mention a missing will stuck in there like a Flake bar in an ice-cream sundae. For fans of Victorian fiction, this is worth the detour.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

    All'inizio questo romanzo sembra essere una specie di mystery novel, con un omicidio e tutti gli annessi e connessi, un testamento scomparso ecc., il tutto visto attraverso gli occhi della piccola Anne Hereford. Poi, di colpo, la trama subisce una deviazione: Anne cresce e ci racconta aneddoti della sua vita scolastica, che apparentemente nulla hanno a che fare con l'omicidio di cui sopra, il che mi ha lasciata un po' delusa. Infine la storia di Anne diventa molto simile a quella di "Jane Eyre", o All'inizio questo romanzo sembra essere una specie di mystery novel, con un omicidio e tutti gli annessi e connessi, un testamento scomparso ecc., il tutto visto attraverso gli occhi della piccola Anne Hereford. Poi, di colpo, la trama subisce una deviazione: Anne cresce e ci racconta aneddoti della sua vita scolastica, che apparentemente nulla hanno a che fare con l'omicidio di cui sopra, il che mi ha lasciata un po' delusa. Infine la storia di Anne diventa molto simile a quella di "Jane Eyre", ovvero quella di una governante che si ritrova in una magione dove avvengono fatti misteriosi e che s'innamorerà del proprio anfitrione, il quale cela un segreto che non può condividere con lei. Anche se avevo intuito quale fosse il segreto, la narrazione mi ha avvinta e ho letto questa parte del romanzo con grande coinvolgimento. Una lettura davvero piacevole, che tuttavia non raggiunge mai i livelli di "East Lynne", il romanzo più noto di Mrs Henry Wood e che mi aveva spinto a cercarne un altro della stessa autrice. Ad ogni modo, una lettura che consiglio.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mrsgaskell

    This is by the author of East Lynne which is one of my "desert island" books. Anne Hereford is also a Victorian sensation novel but not quite as sensational as East Lynne. It's a compelling read and I enjoyed it very much. Anne is an eleven-year-old orphan when we meet her on a train bound for the home of her Aunt Selina. Due to tragic events, her stay is a short one, and she is soon sent to another relative and boarding school in quick succession. Due to a missing will, likely stolen and destro This is by the author of East Lynne which is one of my "desert island" books. Anne Hereford is also a Victorian sensation novel but not quite as sensational as East Lynne. It's a compelling read and I enjoyed it very much. Anne is an eleven-year-old orphan when we meet her on a train bound for the home of her Aunt Selina. Due to tragic events, her stay is a short one, and she is soon sent to another relative and boarding school in quick succession. Due to a missing will, likely stolen and destroyed, she must earn a living as a governess. She meets a former school mate who engages her as a companion and soon finds herself at Chandos in England, where there are family secrets, rumours of ghosts, and where she is thrown into close contact with the attractive Harry Chandos.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cece

    A rip-roaring saga of scandal, orphans done wrong by, marriage for money, murder, revenge, disgruntled servants, overworked governesses, family secrets, spoiled aristocrats, French finishing schools, elopements, mysterious west wings...whats not to love? Add a surprisingly modern pace and lack of the preachy overwordiness often ascribed to Victorian novelists, and this was a page-turner extraordinaire. By the author of the more famous East Lynne, and 48 other books of this ilk-not all easily fou A rip-roaring saga of scandal, orphans done wrong by, marriage for money, murder, revenge, disgruntled servants, overworked governesses, family secrets, spoiled aristocrats, French finishing schools, elopements, mysterious west wings...whats not to love? Add a surprisingly modern pace and lack of the preachy overwordiness often ascribed to Victorian novelists, and this was a page-turner extraordinaire. By the author of the more famous East Lynne, and 48 other books of this ilk-not all easily found in print, but all available in a bundle for Kindle. Summer reading heaven indeed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    This is an enjoyable enough page turner and although not one of Mrs Wood’s best, it is better than some of her more mundane domestic fiction. Some of the plot devices are convoluted even by sensation novel standards and characters withholding information from one another in order to stretch out the suspense becomes tedious and frustrating at times. The rigid Victorian class system is exposed, but the author appears to be condemning it and condoning it at the same time. And, for me, some of the p This is an enjoyable enough page turner and although not one of Mrs Wood’s best, it is better than some of her more mundane domestic fiction. Some of the plot devices are convoluted even by sensation novel standards and characters withholding information from one another in order to stretch out the suspense becomes tedious and frustrating at times. The rigid Victorian class system is exposed, but the author appears to be condemning it and condoning it at the same time. And, for me, some of the pious sentiments of the author sit uncomfortably in what is basically an escapist read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Neri

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marichoy Obina

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sultana

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zahara Cerise~Bringing Out the Ghost in All of Us

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sai Sruthi

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dino Constantinou

  18. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Mac

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ann-Marie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mary Durrant

  22. 5 out of 5

    Beata

  23. 5 out of 5

    VAN

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sobriquet

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  28. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shakthi Bhaskar

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen

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