counter create hit Unsettled: The Problem of Loving Israel - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Unsettled: The Problem of Loving Israel

Availability: Ready to download

Israel.The word itself can mean arguing with God, and talking about Israel can start endless arguments about politics, history, morality, and prejudice. Unsettled, Marc Aronson's most deeply personal book to date, explores the history of Israel, from the beginning of the Zionist movement to the birth of Israel as a state in 1948 to the intense confA[ licts over Israel, the Israel.The word itself can mean arguing with God, and talking about Israel can start endless arguments about politics, history, morality, and prejudice. Unsettled, Marc Aronson's most deeply personal book to date, explores the history of Israel, from the beginning of the Zionist movement to the birth of Israel as a state in 1948 to the intense confA[ licts over Israel, the Palestinians, and the Jewish settlements of today. Along the way Aronson intersperses stories from his own family's long experiences in Israel while asking and answering such questions as: Can a religious state also be a democratic one? Is Israel the victim or the aggressor? Do modern states have moral obligations? And perhaps the most troubling question of all: What kind of Israel should exist? Once again, Aronson has created history for young adults that is exciting, probing, clear, and most of all, fearless.


Compare

Israel.The word itself can mean arguing with God, and talking about Israel can start endless arguments about politics, history, morality, and prejudice. Unsettled, Marc Aronson's most deeply personal book to date, explores the history of Israel, from the beginning of the Zionist movement to the birth of Israel as a state in 1948 to the intense confA[ licts over Israel, the Israel.The word itself can mean arguing with God, and talking about Israel can start endless arguments about politics, history, morality, and prejudice. Unsettled, Marc Aronson's most deeply personal book to date, explores the history of Israel, from the beginning of the Zionist movement to the birth of Israel as a state in 1948 to the intense confA[ licts over Israel, the Palestinians, and the Jewish settlements of today. Along the way Aronson intersperses stories from his own family's long experiences in Israel while asking and answering such questions as: Can a religious state also be a democratic one? Is Israel the victim or the aggressor? Do modern states have moral obligations? And perhaps the most troubling question of all: What kind of Israel should exist? Once again, Aronson has created history for young adults that is exciting, probing, clear, and most of all, fearless.

30 review for Unsettled: The Problem of Loving Israel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Milton Lee

    It was rather American in perspective, I feel.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lil Jen

    Interesting views of an area never at peace.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    OK, there's no such thing as an objective book that has all the answers on this topic, so it's easy to criticize. But I will anyway. I file this under "what a liberal American Jew should think about Israel" which makes it a helpful perspective for this peripherally Jewish American who never really gave much thought to Israel. Haven for Jews, plus. Oppresses own minority, minus. Like America, it could do better at living up to its lofty ideals. No arguments here. But the tone was pretty insufferab OK, there's no such thing as an objective book that has all the answers on this topic, so it's easy to criticize. But I will anyway. I file this under "what a liberal American Jew should think about Israel" which makes it a helpful perspective for this peripherally Jewish American who never really gave much thought to Israel. Haven for Jews, plus. Oppresses own minority, minus. Like America, it could do better at living up to its lofty ideals. No arguments here. But the tone was pretty insufferable. The author is SO well-meaning yet just comes across as hyper preachy and anti-religious. He leans heavily on parallels with American history, some of which hit their mark (the use of torture in the war on terror in both countries), most of which don't (slavery in the US and the treatment of Palestinians in Israel), and are almost always pointless, distracting, and weirdly competitive. He mentions Birthright by name and concludes that the most helpful thing young American Jews can do is to model for Israelis our fabled American tolerance. Please. Also, what is the audience for this book? It's marketed as YA, but it seems to alternate between college level history and references to Harry Potter. I kind of wish I'd skipped to the end and found the helpful reading list earlier.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jack

    Marc Aronson, author of Race: A History Beyond Black and White, brings an unabashedly personal perspective to Unsettled, an accessible and thought-provoking history of the state of Israel. Though not Israeli himself, Aronson has strong family ties to the region. This sort-of-insider and sort-of-outsider status gives him a good vantage point from which to interrogate the ideologies and actions that echo through Israel's history. Though the story that Aronson tells is more-or-less historically li Marc Aronson, author of Race: A History Beyond Black and White, brings an unabashedly personal perspective to Unsettled, an accessible and thought-provoking history of the state of Israel. Though not Israeli himself, Aronson has strong family ties to the region. This sort-of-insider and sort-of-outsider status gives him a good vantage point from which to interrogate the ideologies and actions that echo through Israel's history. Though the story that Aronson tells is more-or-less historically linear, the book's chapter titles take the form of tough. provocative questions -- such as "Can Israel Occupy Conquered Lands and Be True To Its Ideals?" and "How can Israel be a Strong State, A Jewish Homeland, and Truly Democratic?" -- that drive the telling forward. Of course these questions cannot be answered definitively by anyone, but through his book Aronson delivers an even-handed and full yet remarkably clear exploration, grounded in reverence and respect for the ideals of Israel's beleaguered people.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amber Lovett Dhamija

    Aronson, Marc. Unsettled: The Problem of Loving Israel. 2008. 183 pp. $18.99. Atheneum. 978-1416912613. Ages 13 & up. Marc Aronson presents a well-researched and deeply personal history of Israel. The narrative arc follows the history of Israel’s founding from before WWII to the present, and Aronson includes historical information as well as personal photographs and stories of family members who have lived in Israel. The story is crafted around difficult questions such as, “Can Israel Occupy Con Aronson, Marc. Unsettled: The Problem of Loving Israel. 2008. 183 pp. $18.99. Atheneum. 978-1416912613. Ages 13 & up. Marc Aronson presents a well-researched and deeply personal history of Israel. The narrative arc follows the history of Israel’s founding from before WWII to the present, and Aronson includes historical information as well as personal photographs and stories of family members who have lived in Israel. The story is crafted around difficult questions such as, “Can Israel Occupy Conquered Lands and Be True To Its Ideals?” Rather than attempt to answer these questions or defend Israeli or Palestinian actions, Aronson encourages readers to ponder these questions for themselves. The history is broad, not deep, and the personal anecdotes and parallels Aronson draws to U.S. history and culture will help students relate to the complex issues discussed. For students interested in Israel or the Middle East, this book offers an engaging though by no means comprehensive introduction to the tensions surrounding the nation of Israel. Highly recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    Marc Aronson takes a look at the history of Israel and what it means to be Jewish in Israel. This is not a straight-forward historical book, but a personal soul-searching by the author. He does a lot of back and forth between the ideal Israel and the actual Israel. He also compares Israel to America and American Jews to Israeli Jews. Even though he does touch on some controversial topics in this book, it is still more of a personal journey about why Aronson does not live in Israel and what he wi Marc Aronson takes a look at the history of Israel and what it means to be Jewish in Israel. This is not a straight-forward historical book, but a personal soul-searching by the author. He does a lot of back and forth between the ideal Israel and the actual Israel. He also compares Israel to America and American Jews to Israeli Jews. Even though he does touch on some controversial topics in this book, it is still more of a personal journey about why Aronson does not live in Israel and what he wishes it was. It wasn't exactly what I thought it was going to be and was a little difficult to read. Aronson never really comes to any conclusions, just back and forth on the topics he discusses.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    starred kirkus

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Review here: http://teenreads.com/reviews/97814169... The bad punctuation in the first paragraph was edited in. :-( Review here: http://teenreads.com/reviews/97814169... The bad punctuation in the first paragraph was edited in. :-(

  9. 4 out of 5

    Six

    I am currently putting together a reading list fr the Middle East. I understand the point of the book, but it felt extremely wishy washy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paula Hickey

  11. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett

  12. 4 out of 5

    Serene Lim

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lrashid

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  15. 4 out of 5

    Arlene

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lockc

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robin

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anita

  21. 5 out of 5

    sharon

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chrissy

  23. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

  24. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  26. 4 out of 5

    Natalee

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dean Davison

  28. 5 out of 5

    East Library UWCSEA

  29. 5 out of 5

    Barbara A.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.