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Inside History of the White House: The Complete History of the Domestic and Official Life in Washington of the Nation's Presidents and Their Families (1908)

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Gilson Willets was a globe traveling reporter for 25 years who journeyed for three months through India and was also a member of the Harriman expedition to the Yucatan. Willets put his varied and often dangerous experiences to good use writing Inside History of the White House. The author writes: "This is Presidential Year. It is the year in which we elect anew Chief Execu Gilson Willets was a globe traveling reporter for 25 years who journeyed for three months through India and was also a member of the Harriman expedition to the Yucatan. Willets put his varied and often dangerous experiences to good use writing Inside History of the White House. The author writes: "This is Presidential Year. It is the year in which we elect anew Chief Executive of the nation. And, following the election, the time comes when, with profound regret, we say adieu to one of the most extraordinary Presidents in our country's history, while at the same time we welcome, with sincere congratulations, the inauguration and entrance to the White House of that forceful man who, for the next four years, will perform the arduous duties of the country's twenty-seventh Chief Magistrate. "So is this the season when, by reason of the great events in connection with the Presidency, we become naturally and deeply interested in the most exalted office within the gift of the people; in the different men who, through a century and more, have held that office; in the man who at present holds that post; in the man who is soon to succeed the incumbent of to-day; and, above all, in the official and domestic life of each and every one of the masters and mistresses of the White House in the one hundred and eight years of its existence." CONTENTS I. Over a Century of the White House. II. The First, Second and Third White Houses. III. White House Life of the Roosevelts. IV. Inaugurations — Washington to Buchanan V. Inaugurations — Lincoln to Roosevelt. VI. Early "First Gentlemen" and Their Daily Routine. VII. Later "First Gentlemen" and Their Day's Work. VIII. "First Ladies" and Presidents' Widows. IX. Early White House Hostesses. X. Later White House Hostesses. XI. Relatives as "First Ladies." XII. Secretaries to the Presidents. XIII. Letters and Gifts for the Presidents. XIV. Employes and Clerical Staff. XV. Secret Service and Military Aides. XVI. Presidential Messages and Cabinets. XVII. Public and Private Roos. XVIII. White House Portraits and Painters. XIX. Maintenance of Building and Grounds. XX. Three Alarms of Fire. XXI. Babies of the White House. XXII. Child Life at the President's House. XXIII. Sons of the Presidents. XXIV. Daughters of the Presidents. XXV. Grandchildren of the Executive Mansion. XXVI. Brides of the White House. XXVII. Bridegroom-Presidents. XXVIII. Romance of Nellie Grant. XXIX. Romance of Alice Roosevelt. XXX. Entertaining at the White House. XXXI. Etiquette and Precedence. XXXII. Early-Day "Drawing-Rooms" and Levees. XXXIII. Latter-Day Receptions and Handshaking. XXXIV. Holidays at the White House XXXV. Dinners and Other Meals. XXXVI. At the Table and in the Kitchen. XXXVII. Calling on the President. XXXVIII. Notable Visitors at the White House. XXXIX. Royal and Titled Guests. XL. Prince of Wales and General Lafayette. XLI. When Diplomats Pay Their Respects. XLII. Sunday and the Bible at the White House. XLIII. Church-Going of the Presidents. XLIV. Charities of the White House Tenants. XLV. Recreations of the Presidents. XLVI. Presidential Horses, Carriages and Stables XLVI. Presidential Farewells to the White House. XLVIII. Died in the White House. XLIX. Passing of the Three Martyred Presidents. L.


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Gilson Willets was a globe traveling reporter for 25 years who journeyed for three months through India and was also a member of the Harriman expedition to the Yucatan. Willets put his varied and often dangerous experiences to good use writing Inside History of the White House. The author writes: "This is Presidential Year. It is the year in which we elect anew Chief Execu Gilson Willets was a globe traveling reporter for 25 years who journeyed for three months through India and was also a member of the Harriman expedition to the Yucatan. Willets put his varied and often dangerous experiences to good use writing Inside History of the White House. The author writes: "This is Presidential Year. It is the year in which we elect anew Chief Executive of the nation. And, following the election, the time comes when, with profound regret, we say adieu to one of the most extraordinary Presidents in our country's history, while at the same time we welcome, with sincere congratulations, the inauguration and entrance to the White House of that forceful man who, for the next four years, will perform the arduous duties of the country's twenty-seventh Chief Magistrate. "So is this the season when, by reason of the great events in connection with the Presidency, we become naturally and deeply interested in the most exalted office within the gift of the people; in the different men who, through a century and more, have held that office; in the man who at present holds that post; in the man who is soon to succeed the incumbent of to-day; and, above all, in the official and domestic life of each and every one of the masters and mistresses of the White House in the one hundred and eight years of its existence." CONTENTS I. Over a Century of the White House. II. The First, Second and Third White Houses. III. White House Life of the Roosevelts. IV. Inaugurations — Washington to Buchanan V. Inaugurations — Lincoln to Roosevelt. VI. Early "First Gentlemen" and Their Daily Routine. VII. Later "First Gentlemen" and Their Day's Work. VIII. "First Ladies" and Presidents' Widows. IX. Early White House Hostesses. X. Later White House Hostesses. XI. Relatives as "First Ladies." XII. Secretaries to the Presidents. XIII. Letters and Gifts for the Presidents. XIV. Employes and Clerical Staff. XV. Secret Service and Military Aides. XVI. Presidential Messages and Cabinets. XVII. Public and Private Roos. XVIII. White House Portraits and Painters. XIX. Maintenance of Building and Grounds. XX. Three Alarms of Fire. XXI. Babies of the White House. XXII. Child Life at the President's House. XXIII. Sons of the Presidents. XXIV. Daughters of the Presidents. XXV. Grandchildren of the Executive Mansion. XXVI. Brides of the White House. XXVII. Bridegroom-Presidents. XXVIII. Romance of Nellie Grant. XXIX. Romance of Alice Roosevelt. XXX. Entertaining at the White House. XXXI. Etiquette and Precedence. XXXII. Early-Day "Drawing-Rooms" and Levees. XXXIII. Latter-Day Receptions and Handshaking. XXXIV. Holidays at the White House XXXV. Dinners and Other Meals. XXXVI. At the Table and in the Kitchen. XXXVII. Calling on the President. XXXVIII. Notable Visitors at the White House. XXXIX. Royal and Titled Guests. XL. Prince of Wales and General Lafayette. XLI. When Diplomats Pay Their Respects. XLII. Sunday and the Bible at the White House. XLIII. Church-Going of the Presidents. XLIV. Charities of the White House Tenants. XLV. Recreations of the Presidents. XLVI. Presidential Horses, Carriages and Stables XLVI. Presidential Farewells to the White House. XLVIII. Died in the White House. XLIX. Passing of the Three Martyred Presidents. L.

30 review for Inside History of the White House: The Complete History of the Domestic and Official Life in Washington of the Nation's Presidents and Their Families (1908)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shelly Boltz-Zito

    Very interesting! How enlighting is this book! What a look into the past of the White House and the Presidents, First Ladies and children. It only goes to President Teddy Roosevelt, and was written early 1900s but very interesting. Given by several points of view by people that were there, it is a history lesson into the past of a building and lives that make us the United States and the White House is truly the people's house. Very interesting! How enlighting is this book! What a look into the past of the White House and the Presidents, First Ladies and children. It only goes to President Teddy Roosevelt, and was written early 1900s but very interesting. Given by several points of view by people that were there, it is a history lesson into the past of a building and lives that make us the United States and the White House is truly the people's house.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda S Hruskach

  3. 4 out of 5

    jimdugan

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gerald O'Rourke

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stella ewing

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert Alexander

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sue Singleton

  8. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Weidner

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cecil L. Oswalt Sr

  10. 5 out of 5

    Robbin Bullard

  11. 4 out of 5

    Debra Friedman

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Elton

  13. 4 out of 5

    ann bartrem

  14. 5 out of 5

    very good with a lot of histlorical facts

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marlene Paxson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sandi Colver

  17. 4 out of 5

    John

  18. 5 out of 5

    Frances Whaley

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rowena Anderson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Den

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mary Kreuzer

  23. 5 out of 5

    Donna McComas

  24. 5 out of 5

    John E. Bruning

  25. 5 out of 5

    Roseanne

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paul Hasley

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Waugh

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lavon Hellinga

  29. 5 out of 5

    Helen Sanders

  30. 5 out of 5

    connie grigsby

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