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Intercom on Jobs to be Done

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This book should help product managers, marketers and designers understand the causality of product design, sales and continued usage. Jobs-to-be-Done offers a unique perspective for web and software businesses. The low hanging fruit of correlation and large sample sizes is fast running out. Focusing on the job, understanding true causality, is going to be the only way to get p This book should help product managers, marketers and designers understand the causality of product design, sales and continued usage. Jobs-to-be-Done offers a unique perspective for web and software businesses. The low hanging fruit of correlation and large sample sizes is fast running out. Focusing on the job, understanding true causality, is going to be the only way to get people to switch and use your product.


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This book should help product managers, marketers and designers understand the causality of product design, sales and continued usage. Jobs-to-be-Done offers a unique perspective for web and software businesses. The low hanging fruit of correlation and large sample sizes is fast running out. Focusing on the job, understanding true causality, is going to be the only way to get p This book should help product managers, marketers and designers understand the causality of product design, sales and continued usage. Jobs-to-be-Done offers a unique perspective for web and software businesses. The low hanging fruit of correlation and large sample sizes is fast running out. Focusing on the job, understanding true causality, is going to be the only way to get people to switch and use your product.

30 review for Intercom on Jobs to be Done

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    A practical guide to JTBD framework for apps development. Key insights: - People hire a product to do a job. "It’s easier to make things people want, than it is to make people want things." - Products change with years, but jobs stay the same (e.g. content for commute). Focus on jobs helps to understand real competitors - The 4 forces influencing a customer switch: problem with current product, attraction of new product, anxiety of change, existing habits - Job stories: [ When _____ ] [ I want to ___ A practical guide to JTBD framework for apps development. Key insights: - People hire a product to do a job. "It’s easier to make things people want, than it is to make people want things." - Products change with years, but jobs stay the same (e.g. content for commute). Focus on jobs helps to understand real competitors - The 4 forces influencing a customer switch: problem with current product, attraction of new product, anxiety of change, existing habits - Job stories: [ When _____ ] [ I want to _____ ] [so I can _____ ] Minus a star for: - Too blatant Intercom promotion in the end - Repetitive blaming of user personas (instead of a deeper explanation of jtbd)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I was hoping for a much more in-depth discussion of the JTBD framework, and would have preferred a more thorough explanation of the concepts. It felt rushed and a bit disjointed. They talked about concepts without introducing them first (e.g. interviews), and didn't really succeed at putting together a cohesive ebook that felt as though they didn't just slap some blogs posts together and call it a day.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ilia Markov

    Good basic intro to the jobs-to-be-done methodology. A bit repetitive at times, but good start if you're just learning about it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vassilena

    A great and concise read on some of the finer points of the Jobs To Be Done framework. Interesting, especially for product people.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jeroen Corthout

    After reading the great book on JTBD "Competing Against Luck" by Clayton Christensen, I was looking for a practical book that helps applying JTBD to software. At first it looked like this was what I found here, but then things started getting repetitive and just taking different angles on the same thing. Just one (well written and slightly different, but still similar) blog post after another basically. Can't help but wondering whether there was clarity on the job this book was going to do when it After reading the great book on JTBD "Competing Against Luck" by Clayton Christensen, I was looking for a practical book that helps applying JTBD to software. At first it looked like this was what I found here, but then things started getting repetitive and just taking different angles on the same thing. Just one (well written and slightly different, but still similar) blog post after another basically. Can't help but wondering whether there was clarity on the job this book was going to do when it was compiled. Still the best book I found to do my job (up till now). (Note: It's 50 pages, not the currently advertised 97. At least in the pdf format.)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Arnas Račkauskas

    Read this short book straight after reading Competing Against Luck, written by the Jobs Theory father Clayton M. Christensen. As I expected, Intercome went straight to the practical side of the theory what crystalized me how it could be used in practice. Read this short book straight after reading Competing Against Luck, written by the Jobs Theory father Clayton M. Christensen. As I expected, Intercome went straight to the practical side of the theory what crystalized me how it could be used in practice.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mittul Desai

    I can't make up my mind around discarding personas and focusing only on JTBD. At the same time, I can't also disregard JTBD and focus just on the personas as my product's users are exactly like the book says, everywhere. I need to read more about this. Nevertheless, this book is a significant resource for anyone trying to understand and apply JTBD to their product and its' benefits can't be neglected.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dmytro Tymoshchenko

    It`s a good thing to read for product managers I think. Not probably for every product manager but this book gives a pretty good alternative for User personas and User stories(not completely agree with that). Good product manager is the one who can give an eye on a problem form different perspectives and JBTD gives this `one more` perspective you need to consider. I can`t say that this book form must-to-read category of books but definitely from should-to-read. It`s a good thing to read for product managers I think. Not probably for every product manager but this book gives a pretty good alternative for User personas and User stories(not completely agree with that). Good product manager is the one who can give an eye on a problem form different perspectives and JBTD gives this `one more` perspective you need to consider. I can`t say that this book form must-to-read category of books but definitely from should-to-read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Denys Shamatazhy

    JTBD is better than the user persona in any way. And this book is a helpful introduction to the idea of JTBD. Must-read for every product manager.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nacho Bassino

    conciso y claro

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jesus Valdez Almaral

    Great book, I just loved it, it teaches you a lot about how to decide what to do with your product in a concise way.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stanislav Krasnoyarov

    Love the book First-hand experience in building one of the best products on the market. I wish they would provide a few more examples, but otherwise it's a great reading.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Oleg

    Good to get know basic ideas about methodology Jobs to be done

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wanjiku

    Very helpful in my job of understanding customers and why they do what they do.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Pitzalis

    This book was more of a blog post than a book, but it's still a great read. The book is helpful for people who are designing products, physical or digital. The main idea is that products match problems, not people. Don't focus on the people, focus on the actual problem they're dealing with. Forget about using personas and user stories, they rely on too many assumptions, use 'job stories' instead. The job story format is 'When (situation) I want to (motivation) so I can (outcome)'. Focusing on the This book was more of a blog post than a book, but it's still a great read. The book is helpful for people who are designing products, physical or digital. The main idea is that products match problems, not people. Don't focus on the people, focus on the actual problem they're dealing with. Forget about using personas and user stories, they rely on too many assumptions, use 'job stories' instead. The job story format is 'When (situation) I want to (motivation) so I can (outcome)'. Focusing on the job to be done makes you more aware of the context your solutions exists in. This lets you design a better solution for the way it will actually be used. You can stop thinking about product categories and types of features. The framework helps you come up with effective, counter-intuitive ways to make your product better. You sell drills. The drill is useful for putting holes in the wall. Most people who use your drill to hang pictures. When they hang pictures, they end up with a more beautiful home. If the job is making a home more beautiful then maybe the next feature should be a gorgeous power docking station, not a better motor like all your competitors are focusing on.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marichka Dzhala

    - The most important thing a product manager does is decide where their product stops and someone else’s product takes over. - People are experts in their problem, not the solution. - If we understood the situation in which people encounter a problem to solve, understand the motivation for solving it, and understand what a great outcome looks like, we were confident that we would be building valuable product for our customers.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Raymond Besiga

    I came across the Jobs To Be Done approach a couple of months ago and was fascinated with its premise. Reading the book filled the gaps that I had from reading various blog posts on the Intercom blog. It is a practical approach that saves teams lots of design and development time while delivering the results to fulfill specific tasks. I have since applied it to the Product Design process of a side project I am working on to great effect.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Cook

    Light, practical, and easy to grasp — like many of the other Intercom mini-guides. Nice primer on the subject and a good mix of Moesta’s/ReWired’s foundational concepts alongside fresh thoughts from Intercom employees and affiliates. Chapter 9 was especially interesting as a heuristic / constraint to add to ‘5 whys’-style thinking that I hadn’t encountered before. Good companion reading with Competing with Luck, but not a sufficient substitute if you want to move beyond the basics.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Benji

    Succinct and to the point - this ebook argues for the general use of job stories over user stories and personas to build the right product. This book perfectly articulates the nagging feeling I've had about user stories and personas that they were not strongly casually linked to product design decisions.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dan Prisk

    If you're interested in using JTBD for software product management this is worth picking up. It's largely a collection of blog posts from the Intercom blog reformatted into an ebook, so if you read that a lot there a good chance you've read a lot of this before. Still a great short read on JTBD with a software focus (very little milkshakes).

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniil Lanovyi

    A condensed book full of practical insights on Jobs-to-be-done framework. Some recipes from the book could bring immediate improvement to your product process. I liked the examples and different perspectives on the topic from the various contributors to this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Santiago Bernal

    Good Book, i recommend that if you are creating new product

  23. 5 out of 5

    Manu

    Excellent book for product people. Adds a fresh perspective while solving difficult problems.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rui

  25. 5 out of 5

    Danny

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marco

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kostas Alexoglou

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kalle

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tiago Martins

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael Ettlinger

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