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By day, Risika sleeps in shaded room in Concord, Massachusetts. By night, she hunts the streets of New York City. She is used to being alone. But someone is following Risika. He has left her a black rose, the same sort of rose that sealed her fate three hundred years ago. Three hundred years ago Risika had a family- a brother and a father who loved her. Three hundred years By day, Risika sleeps in shaded room in Concord, Massachusetts. By night, she hunts the streets of New York City. She is used to being alone. But someone is following Risika. He has left her a black rose, the same sort of rose that sealed her fate three hundred years ago. Three hundred years ago Risika had a family- a brother and a father who loved her. Three hundred years ago she was human. Now she is a vampire, a powerful one. But her past has come back to torment her.


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By day, Risika sleeps in shaded room in Concord, Massachusetts. By night, she hunts the streets of New York City. She is used to being alone. But someone is following Risika. He has left her a black rose, the same sort of rose that sealed her fate three hundred years ago. Three hundred years ago Risika had a family- a brother and a father who loved her. Three hundred years By day, Risika sleeps in shaded room in Concord, Massachusetts. By night, she hunts the streets of New York City. She is used to being alone. But someone is following Risika. He has left her a black rose, the same sort of rose that sealed her fate three hundred years ago. Three hundred years ago Risika had a family- a brother and a father who loved her. Three hundred years ago she was human. Now she is a vampire, a powerful one. But her past has come back to torment her.

30 review for In the Forests of the Night

  1. 5 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣

    A short sweet novelette on the vampires and their grandiosity. Plus a Tiger-loving vampy, a whole lot of talk about power and its origins, Triste witches sect (very high up on their respective horses, judging by Alexander). A really nice sweet short read written by a 13-year old authoress. Worth flipping through the rest of the series, if only to see what this unholy bunch comes up with next. Q: Forever is too long to live in fear. (c) Q: I did not know then that she had been raised to speak a langu A short sweet novelette on the vampires and their grandiosity. Plus a Tiger-loving vampy, a whole lot of talk about power and its origins, Triste witches sect (very high up on their respective horses, judging by Alexander). A really nice sweet short read written by a 13-year old authoress. Worth flipping through the rest of the series, if only to see what this unholy bunch comes up with next. Q: Forever is too long to live in fear. (c) Q: I did not know then that she had been raised to speak a language long dead. (c) Q: as I drank I had an impression of power and…not life or death, but time. And strength and eternity… (c) Q: I simply bring myself away with the ability that only my kind has—the ability to change to pure energy, pure ether, for the instant it takes to travel in that form to another place. It takes me only a thought, and I arrive in less than a second. (c) Q: I simply bring myself away with the ability that only my kind has—the ability to change to pure energy, pure ether, for the instant it takes to travel in that form to another place. It takes me only a thought, and I arrive in less than a second. (c) Q: Close to dawn I lift my head, my long golden hair blending with Tora's tiger fur. I do not think, but add the black stripes to my own tiger-gold hair. "Look, my beautiful," I whisper. "I have stolen your stripes. I will wear them so that your beauty will not be forgotten. (c) Q: In this moment I feel like exactly what I am: a wild child of the darkness. A dangerous shadow in a mood to make trouble. ... I lie back on the counter, thinking on his words, and then I too am gone. We are phantoms of the night, coming and going from the darkened city like shadows in candlelight. (c) Q: People say he treats all life as a game that must be played—a cruel and deadly game in which whoever is winning makes the rules.(c) Q: "I see someone who does not show his true eyes," I observe. "What do you see?" (c) Q: Jessica writes about vampires, and her books are true, though no one understands how she knows what she does. I wonder if I should tell her my story—perhaps she could write it for me. Perhaps it is my story she now writes. (c) Q: I am in a far more destructive, reckless mood than ever. I remember the stories I have been told about Jager—how he flirted shamelessly with the virgin followers of Hestia in the Greek era, danced in a fairy ring at midnight under the full moon, and spiced up a ceremony performed by a few modern-day Wiccans by making the elements called actually appear. I am in that kind of mood. I have nothing left to lose, and I want to change something.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laurie | LOHF

    Read this one in a day (it's only 147 pages after all) and though it was interesting it wasn't all that memorable. In the Forest of the Night contains only 147 pages and those pages are filled with big fonts and lots of white space. Risika is a 300 year old vampire who was turned and torn from everything she loved when she was only seventeen. The story flips back and forth between present day and the time when Risika was a mortal on the eve of her change. I thought the past story was more engaging Read this one in a day (it's only 147 pages after all) and though it was interesting it wasn't all that memorable. In the Forest of the Night contains only 147 pages and those pages are filled with big fonts and lots of white space. Risika is a 300 year old vampire who was turned and torn from everything she loved when she was only seventeen. The story flips back and forth between present day and the time when Risika was a mortal on the eve of her change. I thought the past story was more engaging than the present. In the present Risika discovers that her archenemy, a darkly handsome Eeevil vampire named Aubrey (who is evil, I'm guessing, simply because he can be), is near and begins causing her great distress. She fears him, he's more powerful than she, but yet stubbornly defies him, baits him and, by her actions, basically dares him to come after her. It didn't make any sense to me. Because of her actions a tragedy occurs. For a 300 year old vampire she doesn't appear all that bright and is completely ineffective for the majority of the book when it comes to dealing with Aubrey. The glimpses into Risika's past as she learns to live her life in darkness are much more interesting than the present bits with Aubrey. The writer was only thirteen when she wrote the story (according to the blurb) and, to my jaded eyes, it shows. Her character lacks maturity and common sense and character motivation wasn't explored as nearly as fully as it should have been. There was also an odd sense of emotional detachment throughout the book and I never felt like I knew any of these characters very well. But it was the ending that truly did me in. Everything is wrapped up with a twist that isn't explained and didn't make a lick of sense and, again, the lead character acts oddly and without emotion. Though the atmosphere was done exceptionally well (all dark and broody-like) I was left in the dark too often when it came to character motivation and the plot was too thin to rate this book as anything more than average.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Toni

    This book reminded me of Jane Eyre and the three pictures she painted during her holidays in Thornfield- imaginative, powerful, romantic..and created by a teenager. Amelia Atwater-Rhodes was thirteen when she wrote this short book and you can feel it. It's a sketch, a secret notebook, an escape from daily routines and ordinary life, an exporation of the power of words. A 300 year old vampire, Risika/Rachel can just about see her mirror reflection. She hunts as a creature of night -to feed, not to This book reminded me of Jane Eyre and the three pictures she painted during her holidays in Thornfield- imaginative, powerful, romantic..and created by a teenager. Amelia Atwater-Rhodes was thirteen when she wrote this short book and you can feel it. It's a sketch, a secret notebook, an escape from daily routines and ordinary life, an exporation of the power of words. A 300 year old vampire, Risika/Rachel can just about see her mirror reflection. She hunts as a creature of night -to feed, not to kill. Her only love in this world is Tora, a beautiful tiger locked in the zoo. When Tora is killed by an old enemy, Risika fights to avenge both the animal and her own long lost family and by doing so, she rediscovers herself and her own humanity. This book is definitely Pre-Twighlight. It is dark, poetic and...very innocent. What did Amelia grow into? has she fulfilled the promise of her early gift or has Ordinary Life caught up with her?

  4. 4 out of 5

    lady lady

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Definitely one of my all time favorite books. Although it's a short read, Amelia offers a very interesting views on the modern vampire. Her main character -Risika- is a sassy Vampress with a chip on her shoulder. However, she's not brooding and all woe-is-me. (I so tire of those) Amelia's use of First person draws the reader into her 'Den of Shadows'. It's very easy to get caught up in Risika's own bias, whether it's for or against the other inhabitants of the world. For example it's easy to disl Definitely one of my all time favorite books. Although it's a short read, Amelia offers a very interesting views on the modern vampire. Her main character -Risika- is a sassy Vampress with a chip on her shoulder. However, she's not brooding and all woe-is-me. (I so tire of those) Amelia's use of First person draws the reader into her 'Den of Shadows'. It's very easy to get caught up in Risika's own bias, whether it's for or against the other inhabitants of the world. For example it's easy to dislike the main antagonist Aubrey. From Risiki's POV he's truly despicable. Interacting with her only when he wants to torture her or teach her he's top dog. However, an outside look and you can see that it's hinted Aubrey may have had a crush on her hundreds of years ago. Or he's just afraid of the power Risika could gain and he doesn't want to be outdone. (Personally I think he had the hots for her, but gave up at some point and just decided to enjoy being strong and tough.) On the other hand the reader can also be caught up in Risika's love for tigers. Whereas otherwise tigers aren't very important to the reader. (I love tigers, so that was a bonus for me.) Or her unconditional love for her brother and the fact she thinks he's dead. (Whom I kind of don't like by then end. And on one hand she did assume she saw him killed, but the reader can still tell he is behind certain things, not Aubrey.) Overall the plot of the book, which is what whoever is reading this probably cares more about, doesn't just focus on the current events of Risika's life. It's more about how her past has caught up and she must deal with it. Unlike the majority of the vampire heroes today, by the end of the novel Risika doesn't hate or resent herself. Nor has she found solace in believing she's still human even though she's a monster. Instead throughout the novel she looks back on her life and wonders things. Things from when she was Rachel (her birth name) and things from after she was turned. She grows as she comes to terms with what she's done and what she'll need to do. And after dominating Aubrey and closing the chapter in her life of hiding in his shadow, she immediately has to face her brother. Which up to that point she had in a sense been trying to live a relatively peaceful life clinging to her humanity. But as her brother looked at her as if she were a monster, Risika has an epiphany and basically says I am who I am, not who anyone wants me to me. To directly quote the book, 'I am one of them I am also Rachel. I am Risika.' It is my favorite part of any vampire book. In the Forest of the Night introduces you to the Den of Shadows world on a basic level. It's easy to read and understand and nicely ties vampires myths of old with some myths of new. Tis a great story for the fans of older vamp legends, but who're still lenient enough to enjoy a new spin on something old. This has been a Sysanet review. Hope you enjoyed =^.~=

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessie

    Ok...I can’t rate this bc reading it again I see so many parts that shaped my middle school life lmao So cool that the author was only 13 when she wrote this! Inspirational tbh But also I could tell a 13 year old wrote this. I’ve got to read the second one bc I remember that’s the one I rly loved.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jarvis

    The main reason of picking up this book was that it is written by a 13 year old. I didn't really have high expectations but still I expected it to be better than usual YA stuff still it is written by a young girl and they are the figure of creativity. 3.5 stars to this good including a bonus star for not including romance, handsome vampires and werewolves. *Spoilers Ahead* This book is about Risika, a vampire who doesn't want to be a vampire. Anther and Aubrey (Aubrey is a guy, by the way. Wikipe The main reason of picking up this book was that it is written by a 13 year old. I didn't really have high expectations but still I expected it to be better than usual YA stuff still it is written by a young girl and they are the figure of creativity. 3.5 stars to this good including a bonus star for not including romance, handsome vampires and werewolves. *Spoilers Ahead* This book is about Risika, a vampire who doesn't want to be a vampire. Anther and Aubrey (Aubrey is a guy, by the way. Wikipedia says, It is most commonly a female name, although historically its use has been masculine.) converted Risika to vampire and she want to avenge this conversion by killing them. In this book, vampire can take the form of different animals, make themselves invisible to humans and many other powers which depend on their vampire mother. While these powers are different from usual clichés, there were many loopholes in this book. There was no proper flow in which the story moves. You reach at a point and Risika will tell you that vampire can be invisible to human and after some time, vampires can do that too..... and that too. I was looking for a prologue, perhaps, or something in between which, like, explains the legend and this new world. Even after a-three-star-read, I am looking forward to continue this series as I guess it would be great to see how the writing style changes as the author grows up :-) Overall, 3.5 stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Larissa

    I picked up In the Forests of the Night at the same time that I found Vivian Vande Velde's Companions of the Night and read both books within weeks of each other. This title, however, did not stand up well to competition. But rather than launch into the dissection, I'd rather point out that the book was published when Atwater-Rhodes was 13 years old, and for a vampire novel written by a 13 year old, it's pretty damn good, or at the very least, peppered with a rather lot of small endearments. Atw I picked up In the Forests of the Night at the same time that I found Vivian Vande Velde's Companions of the Night and read both books within weeks of each other. This title, however, did not stand up well to competition. But rather than launch into the dissection, I'd rather point out that the book was published when Atwater-Rhodes was 13 years old, and for a vampire novel written by a 13 year old, it's pretty damn good, or at the very least, peppered with a rather lot of small endearments. Atwater-Rhodes gives her vamps alluring, arcane-sounding names like "Risika" and "Aubrey." She is very fond of words like "ambrosia," which she uses over and over. She also finds a way to sneak in a reference to a 'young writer in Concord, Massachusetts who writes "true" novels about vampires'...which is such an adorable nod to herself that I kind of wanted to hug her. As for the book's missteps--an annoying structure which hops us between the past and the present every other chapter and a plot line that just sort of plops itself in your lap without any sort of development at all--these are, methinks, a result of the fact that Atwater-Rhodes was pretty new to the whole writing thing when this came out. In order to really critique her books, I'd probably have to read a couple of her more recent offerings (she's 25 now) and see how she's developed as an author. Not really compelled to do further reading based on In the Forests of the Night, but maybe she has a sequel series worth exploring.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Well...So far this book is switching between the present, and 1701. A vampire girl is telling you all the in's and out's about being a vampire. And disproving the myths we humans made out of thin air. Then she starts to flash back to when she was alive, 300 years ago. She was killed when a very powerful vampire, who had been attacked by her brother, decided to choose her as her next victim. As payback for the what her brother had done to her. After she was killed she then was forced to come Well...So far this book is switching between the present, and 1701. A vampire girl is telling you all the in's and out's about being a vampire. And disproving the myths we humans made out of thin air. Then she starts to flash back to when she was alive, 300 years ago. She was killed when a very powerful vampire, who had been attacked by her brother, decided to choose her as her next victim. As payback for the what her brother had done to her. After she was killed she then was forced to come back as a vampire. Thats as far as i've gotten, but i am eager to read on. The riting style is'nt that clear. It seems to skip around a lot, but I like it. It keeps me guessing. Latly I've been having this problem where, even though i've never read, seen, or heard it before, I just know what will happen next, and so far i haven't been wrong. It's realy bumming me out, no surprises! How boring?!? But with this book, I never would have thought about this strange twist of perspective on a vampire's life that the author brings up.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alaina

    “I am one of them. I am also Rachel. I am Risika” (view spoiler)[Let me just say that In the Forests of the Night is a pretty quick and easy read. It also grabs your attention and definitely punches you in the face with some twists. Risika, formally known as Rachel, is a 300 year old vampire. She sort of gives you the ins and outs of what it's like being a vampire. The story shifts back and forth from when she was a human, around the 1700s, to where she is has a vampire. It's a pretty interesting s “I am one of them. I am also Rachel. I am Risika” (view spoiler)[Let me just say that In the Forests of the Night is a pretty quick and easy read. It also grabs your attention and definitely punches you in the face with some twists. Risika, formally known as Rachel, is a 300 year old vampire. She sort of gives you the ins and outs of what it's like being a vampire. The story shifts back and forth from when she was a human, around the 1700s, to where she is has a vampire. It's a pretty interesting story. I fell in love with Risika's story and character right from the start. I had so many questions going through my mind while reading...and I think I only really got one answer, maybe?!? Risika is a motherfucking bad ass. She doesn't take anyone's shit, especially Aubrey's. Aubrey basically thinks he's the shit and that he is stronger than Risika. He makes it look like he killed her twin brother, Alexander--who is actually a fucking vampire himself..but I'll get back to this--and he actually killed her most prized possession: Tora, her Bengal tiger. Once that happened I was all for revenge. He deserved it and I just wanted to read about him getting his ass kicked. Trust me it was so worth it. Aubrey is no Risika's little bitch because she is actually a lot stronger and smarter than him. Now Alexander can take his judgmental ass and leave Risika alone. She had to adapt to the life of a vampire and he's judging her for her choices? Calm down. You aren't a saint either buddy. Does he not realize he's a vampire too? Does he not remember why she was even turned into a god damn vampire to begin with? Other than that...... I loved this book. I can't wait to read about what else these crazy vampires get into... (hide spoiler)]

  10. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Risika, born Rachel Weatere in 1684, and now a vampire in contemporary Concord, is haunted by her past in this moody teen thriller. The daughter of colonial Puritans, Rachel was changed into a vampire and renamed Risika by the powerful Ather. Her hatred is reserved for Aubrey however, who murdered her twin brother Alexander. Flashbacks from that earlier time alternate with scenes from the present, as the book leads inexorably to a showdown between Risika and Aubrey. Written by the author when she Risika, born Rachel Weatere in 1684, and now a vampire in contemporary Concord, is haunted by her past in this moody teen thriller. The daughter of colonial Puritans, Rachel was changed into a vampire and renamed Risika by the powerful Ather. Her hatred is reserved for Aubrey however, who murdered her twin brother Alexander. Flashbacks from that earlier time alternate with scenes from the present, as the book leads inexorably to a showdown between Risika and Aubrey. Written by the author when she was thirteen, and published when she was fifteen, In the Forests of the Night was something of a sensation when it appeared back in 1999. Although it never strayed very far from the conventions governing such teen thrillers, Atwater-Rhodes' debut was surprisingly well-written for such a young author. With the recent advent of writers such as Christopher Paolini, Nancy Yi Fan and Flavia Bujor, the children's literature scene has become more accustomed to adolescent authors, but it was still something of a novelty when this was first released.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    “Love is the strongest emotion any creature can feel except for hate, but hate can't hurt you. Love, and trust, and friendship, and all the other emotions humans value so much, are the only emotions that can bring pain. Only love can break a heart into so many pieces.” Risika, In the Forest of the Night, Amelia Atwater-Rhodes This is going to be another novel that is very difficult to talk about fairly. I first read this book right after it came out, and I have to say it changed me. I won't preten “Love is the strongest emotion any creature can feel except for hate, but hate can't hurt you. Love, and trust, and friendship, and all the other emotions humans value so much, are the only emotions that can bring pain. Only love can break a heart into so many pieces.” Risika, In the Forest of the Night, Amelia Atwater-Rhodes This is going to be another novel that is very difficult to talk about fairly. I first read this book right after it came out, and I have to say it changed me. I won't pretend it is really well written or extremely novel, it just happened to come out while I was a preteen and hit right when I needed it. This was the first real vampire novel I had ever read and from it I started to devour anything with vampires, werewolves, and anything vaguely occult. This is the book that helped me discover Anne Rice after I read a review calling Atwater-Rhodes a young adult version of Ann Rice. One of the most striking things about this novel is that Atwater-Rhodes wrote it when she was 13 and had it published before she was 15 (it was supposed to be published on her 14th birthday). Knowing this, while I read the book at 13, made me realize that it was possible for me to write as well. It was then that I really began to do creative writing. While I have yet to finish my own novel, I do owe a lot to this novel. While it is a fast read and not very long, there is a lot packed into it. The story is about the life of a vampire named Risika, and is told in two story arcs. There is the present day story that follows Risika as she settles into life, but is interrupted by the one person from her past that she cannot stand, a vampire named Aubrey. There is a history between the two that means they cannot tolerate each other, and Risika has already lost a fight to Aubrey once, but to back down would mean showing weakness. The vampires cannot show weakness, it means you are prey, but neither is willing to just attack so they have to resort to a strange dance and taunts. The other story arc tells the story of Rachel, the young girl from the late 1600’s in Massachusetts, who would be turned into Risika. Rachel and her twin brother are close and live happily with their father, step-mother and younger sister. Her brother begins to believe that he has a power to control things, and losses control and burns their younger sister. He then starts to become distant to Rachel, just as a strange visitor stops by the house and gives her a black rose, which she pricks her finger upon. With one drop of blood Rachel has unknowingly condemned herself to a fate she did not even know existed. How will she become Risika? And will Risika be able to finally stand up to Aubrey or will she die for real this time? One of the things I really love about this book and the others set in this world, is that the vampires are still dangerous. They are sympathetic and Atwater-Rhodes often sets the story from their point of view, but most of them (besides a few in the later books) drink human blood, and still kill people. One of the themes that Risika has to deal with is that she used to be human, but she is not human anymore and there is no good thinking as a human. It is hard on her to realize that humanity is a weakness in vampires, and a weakness can mean death or subjugation, a fate she is not willing to live with. The Risika that we see at the end of the book is a very different creature than Rachel, and this is a fascinating thing that is often overlooked in many of the modern vampire tales. Aubrey, on the other hand, is a great vampire, he is attractive, but he is not human; he is a hunter and he relishes being the predator. We never see him in conflict with his nature. Atwater-Rhodes has taken a very unique path in regards to what parts of the vampire legends she uses. Risika talks about the sun, religious icons, silver, and decapitation and explains their ineffectiveness quite frankly. The hunger is still present, but it can be controlled if they feed in smaller amounts regularly, but if they expend too much energy or wait too long, the animal instincts start to reappear and their senses shrink to focus on blood alone! The vampires also grow stronger as they age, and with the strength their reflections fade. Their powers grow mostly with age, but there is also power from having a traumatic transformation. If one is transformed against their will and they struggle to live, they will make the most powerful of the vampires. Those who choose to be transformed and welcome it are reborn weak and if they do not have a stronger protector can easily be killed by vampire hunters or others of their kind. Some vampires are good at picking out strong willed humans that they know will make good vampires, and then turning them. One of the most interesting aspects of the vampires in this story is their mental abilities. There are different blood lineages of vampires (traced from who turned who), and they are known to have different abilities or personalities or even styles. Risika and Aubrey are of the same lineage, and their line is known for their mental abilities. These can be used to aid their hunting and existence. But it can also be used to fight and control. So when vampires of their caliber do come to blows it is not just a physical fight, but two fights happening at the same time; a mental battle and a physical battle. It is the combination of the two that makes these fights so fascinating. While it is not a very novel story and not very involved, it is well told. This is a great comfort read and can be read in one day (or a couple of hours really). And it is a nice change from all the romances in vampire fiction! Final Verdict: Sink your teeth into this right away! An easy and enjoyable read for the rebellious teenager that lives in your heart!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shelly Brown

    I seriously would give this book a higher score if it was possible. This is still one of my favorite books in this genre.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Solace Winter

    This book has high praise, probably because the author wrote it when she was thirteen. It's a young adult novel with no young adult themes. It's young adult in the fact that it was written by a young adult. Sure, there's a lack of romance or sexuality in it, but it doesn't make it young. It's full of blood, death, and the acceptance of becoming a murderer. The writing is obviously done by a young woman. There is little actual development in characters, or plot. It's a rush of less than 150 pages This book has high praise, probably because the author wrote it when she was thirteen. It's a young adult novel with no young adult themes. It's young adult in the fact that it was written by a young adult. Sure, there's a lack of romance or sexuality in it, but it doesn't make it young. It's full of blood, death, and the acceptance of becoming a murderer. The writing is obviously done by a young woman. There is little actual development in characters, or plot. It's a rush of less than 150 pages. I didn't care about the lead character, or any of the sub-characters who were only mentioned because they had to be. She felt this connection of love to an animal, but I never understood exactly why. That being said, at the end of the novel I still feel this compulsion to want to read on. More because they are quick and easy reads and reading the other novel would take me 2 hours tops just to find out where she's going with this plot line. The first novel gives no reason to continue a story and yet I want to know. She did compel me to want to read, but she didn't compel me to care.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I hadn't realised the authors age (when she wrote the book) when I picked this one up. It was fine enough for a short novella but there wasn't enough of a story here. What it needed was another character to offset the predator mindset. The lead girl Rachel was well written for the type of person she was but the emotional impact would have been better with another person. I appreciated that a teenager in the 1700's wasn't unrealistically educated with the exception of her admitting she was outspo I hadn't realised the authors age (when she wrote the book) when I picked this one up. It was fine enough for a short novella but there wasn't enough of a story here. What it needed was another character to offset the predator mindset. The lead girl Rachel was well written for the type of person she was but the emotional impact would have been better with another person. I appreciated that a teenager in the 1700's wasn't unrealistically educated with the exception of her admitting she was outspoken for the time period. I also understood why she didn't develop relationships. The tiger was promising but the brother relationship was underdeveloped. I got more out of "The Silver Kiss" by Annette Curtis Klaus. The relationship with the cat made me cry. Kudos for believeable characters (with the exception of her twin brother Alexander) and vampire mythology. The emotional impact from the climax just wasn't there.

  15. 5 out of 5

    chucklesthescot

    Risika is an old vampire who is being followed by someone from her past who has a grudge against her. 300 years ago Risika was turned into a vampire against her will by the one who stalks her and his powerful allies. She knows the only way to survive is to kill him but is she strong enough to do it? This is not a particularly exciting book. It is a short novella about this vampire who wants revenge on those who turned her. You get a short chapter on her thinking about this followed by a brief bit Risika is an old vampire who is being followed by someone from her past who has a grudge against her. 300 years ago Risika was turned into a vampire against her will by the one who stalks her and his powerful allies. She knows the only way to survive is to kill him but is she strong enough to do it? This is not a particularly exciting book. It is a short novella about this vampire who wants revenge on those who turned her. You get a short chapter on her thinking about this followed by a brief bit about her past, then she threatens the vampire a bit, then we see a bit of the past and so it goes on until the grand finale. It's not exactly a big exciting fight and the ending just drifts into nothing. The characters have no life in them and you are left wondering why it was published and why you wasted your time reading it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kat Zantow

    Goodreads just recommended to me a book by Atwater-Rhodes, and I had a flashback to how much I enjoyed this book when I was in middle school. What I remember: a strong female protagonist, shapeshifting vampires, general incivility in the vampire populace, and good old fashioned revenge. This was a story I encountered long before the trope of 'stuffy moralizing vampire falls in love with teenage girl' nonsense. At least, I don't remember any of that. But I do remember scenes and moments. The same Goodreads just recommended to me a book by Atwater-Rhodes, and I had a flashback to how much I enjoyed this book when I was in middle school. What I remember: a strong female protagonist, shapeshifting vampires, general incivility in the vampire populace, and good old fashioned revenge. This was a story I encountered long before the trope of 'stuffy moralizing vampire falls in love with teenage girl' nonsense. At least, I don't remember any of that. But I do remember scenes and moments. The same cannot be said for many other books I read ten years ago. Though perhaps blending into the recent flush of vampire lit, the strong female protagonist makes In the Forests of the Night a candidate for solid YA.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Heather G Gentle

    Can't get into the characters. Written a little strangely...but... The premise is just interesting enough to have me want to see how the second book continues. If the second one isn't at least some improvement I'll probably skip the others.. And a very very quick read. I don't do this often but I changed the stars on this one-- I just found out the author was 13 when she wrote this book-- that made me see it in a different light! Can't get into the characters. Written a little strangely...but... The premise is just interesting enough to have me want to see how the second book continues. If the second one isn't at least some improvement I'll probably skip the others.. And a very very quick read. I don't do this often but I changed the stars on this one-- I just found out the author was 13 when she wrote this book-- that made me see it in a different light!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ravencrantz

    Yup, still love it. This book is like home to me, there's no way I can write an impartial review. I'm so happy I'm still able to love and enjoy it after all these years. Yup, still love it. This book is like home to me, there's no way I can write an impartial review. I'm so happy I'm still able to love and enjoy it after all these years.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

    This was so good! Little short read, but full of action! And also jumps between 2 times, back in the 1700s, (view spoiler)[explaining her family, the cause for her change, and how she deals with it (hide spoiler)] and the present time, (view spoiler)[showing how she's matured. (hide spoiler)] It never occurred to me that (view spoiler)[Alexander would be alive still! I did think he was a witch though. (hide spoiler)] I love the (view spoiler)[vengeance between Aubrey and Risika, and I just reall This was so good! Little short read, but full of action! And also jumps between 2 times, back in the 1700s, (view spoiler)[explaining her family, the cause for her change, and how she deals with it (hide spoiler)] and the present time, (view spoiler)[showing how she's matured. (hide spoiler)] It never occurred to me that (view spoiler)[Alexander would be alive still! I did think he was a witch though. (hide spoiler)] I love the (view spoiler)[vengeance between Aubrey and Risika, and I just really hope it doesn't turn into a relationship :/ I love the way Risika took his blood, making herself more powerful than him. (hide spoiler)] I love Risika as a character: she's compassionate, follows her morales, is fiercely protective, and also smart. She knows when and when not to do things. Definitely going to continue this one :D

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julianne

    I remember reading this book series as a kid and really liking it. Its dark but still fun. Risika is a powerful vampire from a powerful line. But she feels an intense need to get back at her vampire brother Aubrey for murdering her human brother when she was turned. Its a really quick and no nonsense book. There aren't really any subplots. It switches between Risika's life as a vampire and her life as a human before she was turned. Even though I have a lot of nostalgia for this book, I barely reme I remember reading this book series as a kid and really liking it. Its dark but still fun. Risika is a powerful vampire from a powerful line. But she feels an intense need to get back at her vampire brother Aubrey for murdering her human brother when she was turned. Its a really quick and no nonsense book. There aren't really any subplots. It switches between Risika's life as a vampire and her life as a human before she was turned. Even though I have a lot of nostalgia for this book, I barely remembered the plot. I think I remember the next book in the series a lot more than this one.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina

    Should not have reread. This book is really terrible, but I liked it when I was a kid.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ashlee

    Beautiful and lyrical as always. This was my first vampire story as a teenager back in '99 and it's nice to revisit it. It's comforting and nostalgic I really enjoyed this re-read. Beautiful and lyrical as always. This was my first vampire story as a teenager back in '99 and it's nice to revisit it. It's comforting and nostalgic I really enjoyed this re-read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Hennis

    Review pending

  24. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    First let me say that I took no account to the fact that Amelia Atwater-Rhodes was only thirteen when she wrote this book until after reading it. Why? I find it can create preconceived notions that may hinder one's true experience in reading the book. "Oh she's only fourteen, no wonder she wrote that" "Oh she's fourteen? Well I was going to give this book four stars, but since the writer is only fourteen, I'm going to give it five." This to me is unfair. While it is definitely commendable to get First let me say that I took no account to the fact that Amelia Atwater-Rhodes was only thirteen when she wrote this book until after reading it. Why? I find it can create preconceived notions that may hinder one's true experience in reading the book. "Oh she's only fourteen, no wonder she wrote that" "Oh she's fourteen? Well I was going to give this book four stars, but since the writer is only fourteen, I'm going to give it five." This to me is unfair. While it is definitely commendable to get a book published at fourteen, you still have to engage the reader and doing that has no basis on the age of the author. As someone who is working on writing my own books, one series of which will be Teens/YA, I am curious as to the writing styles of other authors in the field. I read this book in a matter of hours - two or three to be precise. While this was written years ago and I'm not the typical target audience, yet I still enjoyed this book. Most of the characters were well written, the dialogue was quick and the pace was action-packed yet it still made you think. The relationship between the protagonist and antagonist was very good. There were a few instances where either I missed a character introduction or the character came out of left field, Now this may be setting up for future stories and that's okay, but I did have a couple "who are you, what are you doing in this scene?" moments. In addition the author revealed vampire "powers" and abilities as we moved, which is a little unusual and seemed like the easy way out. Nevertheless the book was still enjoyable and my favorite parts of the book was the interactions between the protagonist and antagonist. Very much a old school flavor there in where the villain is not just a simple victory and for me - the more depth and complex - the harder to defeat the villain, which to makes for a much much more enjoyable and thrilling story. Some have said they had trouble following along. I don't know if there is only one version or more, but the one I read had the chapter number is small print, and either NOW or the year (i.e. 1701) in larger print. Most of the chapters alternated but a few were back-to-back in the same setting, but I don't remember ever really losing my place in terms of setting, etc.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    The story is about Risika a three hundred year old vampire who doesn’t get attached to humans who lives in Concord, Massachusetts. Before she was turned her name was Rachel, she lived with her family and she was happy she loved her family. Her twin brother had his own struggles issues with controlling his abilities with fire as well as the voices. When Rachel encounters her brother one night in the dark her life changes forever when she meets Aubrey and Ather. Ather transforms Rachel into a vamp The story is about Risika a three hundred year old vampire who doesn’t get attached to humans who lives in Concord, Massachusetts. Before she was turned her name was Rachel, she lived with her family and she was happy she loved her family. Her twin brother had his own struggles issues with controlling his abilities with fire as well as the voices. When Rachel encounters her brother one night in the dark her life changes forever when she meets Aubrey and Ather. Ather transforms Rachel into a vampire forcing her to feed to live even giving her the name of Risika. While Risika isn’t thrilled with her life it’s Aubrey who still haunts her because he’s the one who killed her brother, he’s the one she fears. She has made a life for herself living among the human feeding in New York but one night she crosses the line into Aubrey’s territory. Changing her life as she begins to taunt Aubrey read for the fight that has been brewing for years. Is she stronger than Aubrey? Risika isn’t your typical vampire after losing her humanity and brother she has shielded away loving anyone but she does find love from a tiger in the zoo. Vampires in the book aren’t the typical kind she doesn’t mind the sun but the high point of the day hurts her eyes. She doesn’t hate garlic but she has such a strong sense of smell she doesn’t like it. Silver and religion don't bother her; she can transform into a hawk and transport herself with the thought. One of my friends suggested this book to me, and being a paranormal addict I was curious to check out one of her favorite series. The author has taken the vampire concept and added her own unique spin creating a whole new breed of vampires. I was captivated by Risika’s story right from the start it’s interesting and I enjoyed the book. The book is a fast read from start to finish I didn’t put it down, I finished it last night before heading to bed in just a few short hours. I think the author did a fantastic job creating a story that teens as well as adults will enjoy. I’m curious to check out the rest of the series as well as her other books.

  26. 4 out of 5

    BookForAHeart

    The number of times I start this book never seems to dwindle down the amount of anticipation and adoration I have for it! I've re-read nearly every one of Amelia Atwater's book in this series and this one was no exception. And I'm glad I picked it up again. The first of the series will always be the best to me. With this book, the tale of the world of witches and shape-shifters and vampires begins! Truth beknown, I'd forgotten all the parts except for the beautiful moments with Tora, the beautiful The number of times I start this book never seems to dwindle down the amount of anticipation and adoration I have for it! I've re-read nearly every one of Amelia Atwater's book in this series and this one was no exception. And I'm glad I picked it up again. The first of the series will always be the best to me. With this book, the tale of the world of witches and shape-shifters and vampires begins! Truth beknown, I'd forgotten all the parts except for the beautiful moments with Tora, the beautifully majestic Bengal tiger that Risika-Rachel has always felt an unfathomable connection. Things and characters like Alexander and Aubrey and his black roses. Which is a shame, because re-reading it makes me nostalgic. Only those came in surprise, refurbishing my memory. Eventually the feelings of the first time I'd read it surfaced, like a flower tucked away in between the yellowed pages of an aged and battered book with a wobbly spine. Besides the fact that she defeated Aubrey as a bengal tiger and adopted Tora's stripes in her hair, my favorite part of the ending scene had to be when she faced her brother and her past, finally. Now she is both Rachel and Risika, only this time a vampress without anything binding her. Not religion, not the church, not her brother or her father, or even bully Aubrey. Even the part where she mentioned Jessica was a bonus. Jessica is one of my favorites of the Den of Shadows heriones, and I loved that Risika thought about asking her to write her tale of 300 years.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Violet

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. So.....It was dark and creepy and scary. She is a vampire and the parts where the author describes her "feeding" is very very creepy/scary. I really like this book, it is well writing and original. It kind of reminds me of Twlight but befor you just all excited remember I said kind of. It is nothing like Twlight but the whole 'real vampires are not like myths' thing is there. Her dark attitude is a sign that she is a vampire and sets the mood for the book. It is dark and creepy. But what do you So.....It was dark and creepy and scary. She is a vampire and the parts where the author describes her "feeding" is very very creepy/scary. I really like this book, it is well writing and original. It kind of reminds me of Twlight but befor you just all excited remember I said kind of. It is nothing like Twlight but the whole 'real vampires are not like myths' thing is there. Her dark attitude is a sign that she is a vampire and sets the mood for the book. It is dark and creepy. But what do you expect for a vampire book? The part with her brother not really dead, well I thought that she was going to tear up and hug him, happy. But she didn't, she did the opposite, she was mad at him and basicly told him to bug off. Well, she did change in the 300 years she'd been a vampire. They say that vampires live forever, but how long is forever? To the end of the universe? No, what am I thinking? Nothing lasts forever, everything dies. But how do vampires, who are supposeed to live forever, die? They don't really say in the book how to kill a vampire, but that's not what I want to know. I want to know how long vampires last. Do they disintegrate after a long time? Or do they last until they can't feed anymore? I don't know, nor should I care. But I can't help asking those questions. So that is it..........a very dark, creepy, scary book. Perfect for Halloween. :)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Shaw

    I will start out by saying that I read this book after I read 'Demon in my View' (yes it still made sense) With that out of the way, Demon in my View lead me to read this one, I only gave it three stars (as well as demon) because while the writing was exeptional (and somewhat cliche/overdone/juvenile at points) and there was a real story line, there wasn't enough! I wanted this to go farther, I wanted there to be deep rooted explanations of all these people mentioned. Whenever a character was int I will start out by saying that I read this book after I read 'Demon in my View' (yes it still made sense) With that out of the way, Demon in my View lead me to read this one, I only gave it three stars (as well as demon) because while the writing was exeptional (and somewhat cliche/overdone/juvenile at points) and there was a real story line, there wasn't enough! I wanted this to go farther, I wanted there to be deep rooted explanations of all these people mentioned. Whenever a character was intoduced to us we got a brief snyopsis of how they were changed/what line they are from/who changed them/ how old they are. While that's all good and well, I don't feel that you can get attached to the characters in the way you should using that method. They seem very distant, and too much like strangers that you want to know, but have to means to interact with. Apparently I liked the book enough to look for it, and I am now in the process of simmering my thoughts about Shattered Mirror, which i finished today. All in all, this way a good story, and you do get into the world but it leaves you wanting more with no way to achieve that goal.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Owen

    To be honest, I wasn't expecting much from this. It was written when the author was thirteen, and it is impressive that it was published, but the writing was very amatuer. (Did I spell that right?) I'm hoping she will get better. As for the plot, it was pretty nonexistent. It felt more like a setup or first half of a novel, but it kind of is considering it's only 147 pages; a novella. I'd say Amelia Atwater-Rhodes is one of my reading guilty pleasures, since she isn't an amazing writer but her b To be honest, I wasn't expecting much from this. It was written when the author was thirteen, and it is impressive that it was published, but the writing was very amatuer. (Did I spell that right?) I'm hoping she will get better. As for the plot, it was pretty nonexistent. It felt more like a setup or first half of a novel, but it kind of is considering it's only 147 pages; a novella. I'd say Amelia Atwater-Rhodes is one of my reading guilty pleasures, since she isn't an amazing writer but her books are pretty entertaining. They are quick reads, light and fun. I'm debating about whether or not to buy the bindup of the first four books in this series on Amazon. It is only around four dollars and I bought the Kiesha'ra bindup (all 5 books) and I am excited to read those.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Night Fury

    I didn't understand this book. What point did it have? Mostly it just talked about a vampire chick and about her past, how she got turned in to a vampire, and her feud with her arch-enemy, Aubrey. I'm sorry, but despite Atwater-Rhodes age, her writing SUCKED. I'm the same age the author when she published In the Forests of the Night, and even I can write better than she can! (I'm sorry if I sounded full of myself there, but its what my sister said) You can tell she probably wrote it in a couple I didn't understand this book. What point did it have? Mostly it just talked about a vampire chick and about her past, how she got turned in to a vampire, and her feud with her arch-enemy, Aubrey. I'm sorry, but despite Atwater-Rhodes age, her writing SUCKED. I'm the same age the author when she published In the Forests of the Night, and even I can write better than she can! (I'm sorry if I sounded full of myself there, but its what my sister said) You can tell she probably wrote it in a couple days and decided it was good enough to haul off to a publisher. If only it was that easy for the rest of us -.-

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