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Tom Sawyer, Detective by Mark Twain, Fiction, Classics

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"Well, it was the next spring after me and Tom Sawyer set our old nigger Jim free, the time he was chained up for a runaway slave down there on Tom's uncle Silas's farm in Arkansaw. The frost was working out of the ground, and out of the air, too, and it was getting closer and closer onto barefoot time every day; and next it would be marble time, and next mumblety-peg, and "Well, it was the next spring after me and Tom Sawyer set our old nigger Jim free, the time he was chained up for a runaway slave down there on Tom's uncle Silas's farm in Arkansaw. The frost was working out of the ground, and out of the air, too, and it was getting closer and closer onto barefoot time every day; and next it would be marble time, and next mumblety-peg, and next tops and hoops, and next kites, and then right away it would be summer and going in a-swimming. It just makes a boy homesick to look ahead like that and see how far off summer is. . . ."


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"Well, it was the next spring after me and Tom Sawyer set our old nigger Jim free, the time he was chained up for a runaway slave down there on Tom's uncle Silas's farm in Arkansaw. The frost was working out of the ground, and out of the air, too, and it was getting closer and closer onto barefoot time every day; and next it would be marble time, and next mumblety-peg, and "Well, it was the next spring after me and Tom Sawyer set our old nigger Jim free, the time he was chained up for a runaway slave down there on Tom's uncle Silas's farm in Arkansaw. The frost was working out of the ground, and out of the air, too, and it was getting closer and closer onto barefoot time every day; and next it would be marble time, and next mumblety-peg, and next tops and hoops, and next kites, and then right away it would be summer and going in a-swimming. It just makes a boy homesick to look ahead like that and see how far off summer is. . . ."

30 review for Tom Sawyer, Detective by Mark Twain, Fiction, Classics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    This story was a further adventure of Tom and Huck and it takes place after “Huckleberry Finn”.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Prabhjot Kaur

    Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn are back again and there is a murder mystery. I love this duo but I like Tom Sawyer a bit more though. The mystery isn't anything spectacular but it is entertaining enough. I didn't much like Huck's POV but the writing is pretty good. It is not as good as the first two books in the series but it isn't bad either. 3 stars Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn are back again and there is a murder mystery. I love this duo but I like Tom Sawyer a bit more though. The mystery isn't anything spectacular but it is entertaining enough. I didn't much like Huck's POV but the writing is pretty good. It is not as good as the first two books in the series but it isn't bad either. 3 stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Tom Sawyer Detective. Wow. Ever seen the Bad News Bears? Walter Matthau and Tatum O'Neal? Pretty good movie. Then they came out with Bad News Bears, Breaking Training and then Bad News Bears Go To Japan. Tom Sawyer Detective serves as the "Bad News Bears Go to Japan" installment of the Tom/Huck franchise. Yeah, Twain was milking it, but I have to admit this book is still worth reading if only for Twain's inimitable style. In this episode, Tom's uncle goes on trial for murder and Tom Sawyer ends u Tom Sawyer Detective. Wow. Ever seen the Bad News Bears? Walter Matthau and Tatum O'Neal? Pretty good movie. Then they came out with Bad News Bears, Breaking Training and then Bad News Bears Go To Japan. Tom Sawyer Detective serves as the "Bad News Bears Go to Japan" installment of the Tom/Huck franchise. Yeah, Twain was milking it, but I have to admit this book is still worth reading if only for Twain's inimitable style. In this episode, Tom's uncle goes on trial for murder and Tom Sawyer ends up basically serving as his lawyer and getting to the bottom of the mystery. Amusingly, he repeatedly refers to the "deceased" as the "diseased" and the "lawyer for the prosecution" as the "lawyer for the prostitution." No one else in the town, of course, even notices his mistake.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kailey (Luminous Libro)

    Gotta love Tom and Huck!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    This is a novella featuring Tom Sawyer at his best. The events are related by Huck Finn. The boys have to go back to Arkansas & help their Uncle Silas & Aunt Sally who are in quite a pickle. By sheer coincidence, they run into the man that helps them unlock the mystery & Tom Sawyer has his day in court. It's a lot of fun. Well narrated by Grover Gardner. This is a novella featuring Tom Sawyer at his best. The events are related by Huck Finn. The boys have to go back to Arkansas & help their Uncle Silas & Aunt Sally who are in quite a pickle. By sheer coincidence, they run into the man that helps them unlock the mystery & Tom Sawyer has his day in court. It's a lot of fun. Well narrated by Grover Gardner.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brian Fagan

    I imagine that most people of today aren't aware of this book. When Twain wrote it in 1896, he was taking advantage of the phase American readers were going through with detective novels. I think with hindsight we can say that wasn't just a fad. Tom Sawyer is pining for excitement: "... it was getting closer and closer on to barefoot time every day; and next it would be summer and going in a-swimming. It just makes a boy homesick to look ahead like that and see how far off summer is. Yes, and it I imagine that most people of today aren't aware of this book. When Twain wrote it in 1896, he was taking advantage of the phase American readers were going through with detective novels. I think with hindsight we can say that wasn't just a fad. Tom Sawyer is pining for excitement: "... it was getting closer and closer on to barefoot time every day; and next it would be summer and going in a-swimming. It just makes a boy homesick to look ahead like that and see how far off summer is. Yes, and it sets him to sighing and saddening around, and there's something the matter with him, he doesn't know what. But anyway, he gets out by himself and mopes and thinks; and mostly he hunts for a lonesome place high up on the hill in the edge of the woods and sets there and looks away off on the big Mississippi down there a-reaching miles and miles around the points where the timber looks smoky and dim it's so far off and still, and everything's so solemn it seems like everybody you've loved is dead and gone and you most wish you was dead and gone too, and done with it all. Don't you know what it is? It's spring fever." Then Tom lucks into a trip with Huck on a Mississippi River sternwheel boat down to his Aunt Sally's farm in Arkansas, because she sent for him. On board, the boys find one of Aunt Sally's clan hiding out. He has stolen two diamonds and fears for his life. When Tom and Huck reach Aunt Sally's, the plot thickens and Tom uses his powers of perception, intuition and old-fashioned smarts to solve the case. Of course Twain's humor is ever present. Describing a trial that he and Tom attended in Arkansas, Huck, our narrator, refers to the "lawyer for the prostitution". But in this novella, the most overarching feel is provided by the young and active imaginations of Tom and Huck running wild, mostly with superstitions about death and ghosts: "We laid down kind of weak and sick, and listened for more sounds, but didn't hear none, for a good while, but just our hearts. We was thinking of that awful thing laying yonder in the sycamores, and it seemed like being that close to a ghost, and it give me the cold shudders. The moon come a-swelling up out of the ground, now, powerful big and round and bright, behind a comb of trees, like a face looking through prison bars, and the black shadders and white places begun to creep around and it was miserable quiet and still and night-breezy and graveyardy and scary."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    There is a reason Tom Sawyer, Detective remains almost unheard of. A very, very good reason. From a literary standpoint, it is awful. The mystery is dramatic and improbable. I had the "murder" figured out almost from the start. The only interesting bit was when Tom's Uncle Silas initially got blamed. However, even that wasn't very well explained. The fact that a court room would allow a teenager to just interrupt the proceedings and spin a dramatic tale is hard enough to swallow. But that they w There is a reason Tom Sawyer, Detective remains almost unheard of. A very, very good reason. From a literary standpoint, it is awful. The mystery is dramatic and improbable. I had the "murder" figured out almost from the start. The only interesting bit was when Tom's Uncle Silas initially got blamed. However, even that wasn't very well explained. The fact that a court room would allow a teenager to just interrupt the proceedings and spin a dramatic tale is hard enough to swallow. But that they would then act upon that story, even after Tom admits he didn't witness most of what he said...! I also didn't care for Huck's POV. Referring to the prosecution as the prostitution is only so funny. It is a sign. I'm getting old. I'm losing my taste for the improbable. But maybe I'm not totally lost yet. I gave this book two extra stars because, even though it fails as a mystery, it wins as a Boys Adventure Novel. At any rate, I think that is what it intended to be. It is a story designed to stir the imagination and illustrate the daring, courage, and wit of our intrepid hero. This isn't supposed to be a classic read. It is simply a good yarn for young readers. Who cares if the court scene is unlikely? The point is, Tom saves the day. There are thieves and murder and last minute discoveries. It is exciting and an adventure! Not a book I recommend reading unless you're willing to suspend disbelief, or if you particularly enjoy children's adventure books from this time. Unfortunately, Huck's language continues to be too much of a problem for this to be good for younger readers. I don't really regret reading it, though I take more pleasure in reflecting on it as a whole than as a specific story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bernard

    As I enjoyed "Tom Sawyer," and really enjoyed "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," which I considered quite a subversive book (which is a big plus for me), I thought this would provide me double enjoyment -- detective fiction and revisiting with Tom and Huck. Well, it wasn't much of a mystery, and though it is narrated by Huck, Huck seems less authentic than in his own book, and is even somewhat citified -- and not dressed as shabbily as elsewhere. Even in "Tom Sawyer," he is characterized as s As I enjoyed "Tom Sawyer," and really enjoyed "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," which I considered quite a subversive book (which is a big plus for me), I thought this would provide me double enjoyment -- detective fiction and revisiting with Tom and Huck. Well, it wasn't much of a mystery, and though it is narrated by Huck, Huck seems less authentic than in his own book, and is even somewhat citified -- and not dressed as shabbily as elsewhere. Even in "Tom Sawyer," he is characterized as something of a wild child, untamed by the civilizing effects of the town. Here, the town seems to have taken full hold of Huck here.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    Tom Sawyer-Detective by Mark Twain is a lesser known codicil to Huckleberry Finn. This twisting tale of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry sees them back down south looking for new adventures. Like the well-known predecessors, this is a beautifully written tale of youth. This short story should be read by all Twain lovers. Published in 1896 this supplement adds more color to both unforgettable characters. I recommend this book to all reading lovers.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    Read as part of a collection see review here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... scroll all the way down to find the title. Read as part of a collection see review here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... scroll all the way down to find the title.

  11. 4 out of 5

    JZ

    Agatha Christie, he ain't. If the writing weren't as humorous as it is, I would have abandoned. Meh. Agatha Christie, he ain't. If the writing weren't as humorous as it is, I would have abandoned. Meh.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Illiterate

    Not much of a detective story. Even less of a spoof.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Gagnon

    Chapter 1: An Invitation for Tom and Huck I knew before I started reading that this story was going to be too short. I really know it after reading this first chapter. I have fallen in love with the narrative. Just as I did as a kid reading 'Huck Finn." I assumed this would be more of a "Tom Sawyer" tale, due to the title and all, but it's more like Huck. Huck is narrating. Tom is being clever. These two are just awesome together. Also, this story seems more and more like a fanfic to me. Twain him Chapter 1: An Invitation for Tom and Huck I knew before I started reading that this story was going to be too short. I really know it after reading this first chapter. I have fallen in love with the narrative. Just as I did as a kid reading 'Huck Finn." I assumed this would be more of a "Tom Sawyer" tale, due to the title and all, but it's more like Huck. Huck is narrating. Tom is being clever. These two are just awesome together. Also, this story seems more and more like a fanfic to me. Twain himself opens the story with a note about how the facts of the story are real and that he just changed the actors, location, and added a few dashes here and there for spice. I love it. I can't wait to see where the adventure takes these two. Chapter 2: Jake Dunlap Another nice little chapter. In ways, this almost feels like what Goosbumps does. Perhaps this only feels slightly more literary because it's got Mark Twain's name on it. I love love LOVE Huck's narrative. It pulls me right into the story, and I think I understand more of the slang now than I did when I first read the Tom and Huck books. There's no big mystery yet, but it's starting to build. Jake has been involved in some kind of robbery. I'm assuming it has something to do with the diamonds I read about on the title page ... and there are ghosts to come as well. I am excited. Chapter 3: A Diamond Robbery Ah hah, it was about the diamonds. Three thieves, including Jake, and they are all dishonest with each other. So much for honor amongst thieves. What I wonder is how they expect to sell the diamonds without getting caught. Sure, it must have been easier back then to steal such things ... but I still think if they sold them close by ... they wouldn't have very good luck. Chapter 4: The Three Sleepers I so don't know who to root for right now. Jake is a thief, and those that are after him are thieves. The only reason Tom and Huck are willing to help him, I think, is because they sorta know him. Or know OF him, really. This tale is also from a time where ... idk ... certain kinds of criminals became celebrities of a sort. I guess that still happens now, but I feel like it happened more then. While I think the media still has a long way to go when it comes to lauding criminals, I think the Internet has been great for bringing an end to that kind of thing. At least certain parts of the Internet. Chapter 5: A Tragedy in the Woods Hrm--HRM?! Is Jake dead? He seems pretty dead. There were five in the field all together. Jake, the two after him, and these two others from the farm itself. So ... did Jake live? Or was that really his ghost? This could be the imaginings of active children. Then again, Jake might have gotten away. There is also a hint toward the end that Jake may have stashed the diamonds before the others got to him. I shall have to continue to get any answers to these chin-strokers. Chapter 6: Plans to Secure the Diamonds Well, I don't like the way the women are treated in this story. I knew Twain was a BIT of a chauvanist ... then again, there was his marvelous friendship with Helen Keller. So I guess he couldn't be ALL bad. I just don't like how Tom purposefully works the women in the story. It's just lame. The diamonds seem to still be in the boots ... but I dunno ... I still feel like that mention of the digging means something. We got a few lines of it again in this chapter. HRM! Chapter 7: A Night's Vigil Aww, poor Huck. I think I'm right. Jake isn't dead. I'm pretty sure what was buried was the diamonds. Jake is laying low in the woods somewhere. Sleepwalking isn't likely. It's all going to come out in the next few chapters, but it's so delightful to read! I know I compared this to a Goosebumps earlier in the commentary ... I don't take it back, but this is certainly a class above. But I still think it only might feel that way because it has Twain's name on it. Like some wines taste better only because of their price tag. Oh, the human mind. Chapter 8: Talking with the Ghost Well, I am glad Huck isn't afraid anymore. Haha. And I am glad this whole ghost business is sorted so soon. There is still the matter of the diamonds ... and Jake can't stay disguised forever. There are still a few chapters left. I wonder how this one is going to wrap. Chapter 9: Finding of Jubiter Dunlap I should have mentioned it. I had a sneaking suspicion that I was wrong about burying the diamonds, and that it was actually a corpse that went into the ground. Just not the corpse of Jake. It was Jubiter. Ah, alas, I stuck with my guns. And it seems Uncle Silas is the murderer ... it seems. At least, that is the impression the title of the next chapter gives. Though, I am not sure. What if the thieves going after Jake mistook Jubiter for his twin, and killed him by mistake. Only two chapters left ... and one way to find out. Chapter 10: The Arrest of Uncle Silas Okay, so Silas THINKS he's committed the murder. The title of the next chapter gives away my suspicions in the last, I think. That's got to be the way the story ends. And when the thieves are caught as the true murderers, Jake will be free to return home, and they can sell the diamonds ... except, really, if true justice is to prevail, the diamonds aught to get sent back to the rightful owners. This last chapter will be the longest of the book. All of our answers lie within. Time to take the final dive. Chapter 11: Tom Sawyer Discovers the Murderers Omigod. So, let's start with, I was a bit wrong. Jake did get murdered. Jubiter took is place. The ending was great. Tom saves the day and all, and I was going to write about that ... but I read the afterward ... and something in there has excited me to no end. Mark Twain disliked Arthur Conan Doyle's "contrived" Sherlock Holmes story, and may have written this as a parody, Tom being Sherlock, and Huck being the hapless Watson. I. Love. This idea. This makes the story feel even more like a fanfic. It's a real life fic because it's based on a real case Twain read about. It's an it parodies his characters as well as others. It's a mystery as only Mark Twain could have done. I am glad to have read it. Now I need to give this book to my niece so she can begin her love affair with Twain.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn are back in a hilarious pursuit of justice when Tom’s uncle Silas is accused of murder. SPOILER ALERT from here on down. If Tom knew that the “stranger” in town was really Jubiter Dunlap, why didn’t he just put him on the witness stand and have him bare his left leg to display the moles that gave him his nickname? Maybe because Tom has to make things as melodramatic and complicated as he can, but it was a nagging question that made the story less than perfect for me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Craig

    Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn visit Aunt Sally and Uncle Silas again to solve a murder most foul. Honestly, while this is a good book, Tom Sawyer is not a particularly exciting detective to follow. I am glad the last three books in the Tom Sawyer/Huck Finn series are narrated by Huck, so that's a plus. Not as memorable or baffling as Tom Sawyer Abroad, and neither book three or book four are on par with The Adventures of Tom Sawyer or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn visit Aunt Sally and Uncle Silas again to solve a murder most foul. Honestly, while this is a good book, Tom Sawyer is not a particularly exciting detective to follow. I am glad the last three books in the Tom Sawyer/Huck Finn series are narrated by Huck, so that's a plus. Not as memorable or baffling as Tom Sawyer Abroad, and neither book three or book four are on par with The Adventures of Tom Sawyer or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Doreen

    I didn't even know this existed till I stumbled across a free Kindle copy. It's really a novella (about 80 pages) of what happens when Tom and Huck get entangled in a murder mystery, based on an actual case that Mark Twain freely admits to using in the opening paragraphs. It's an entertaining story set in the Tom Sawyer universe but nothing dreadfully ground-breaking (tho I did learn a bit more about the times and laws. I'm still astonished that a barely adolescent Tom was his Uncle Silas' de fa I didn't even know this existed till I stumbled across a free Kindle copy. It's really a novella (about 80 pages) of what happens when Tom and Huck get entangled in a murder mystery, based on an actual case that Mark Twain freely admits to using in the opening paragraphs. It's an entertaining story set in the Tom Sawyer universe but nothing dreadfully ground-breaking (tho I did learn a bit more about the times and laws. I'm still astonished that a barely adolescent Tom was his Uncle Silas' de facto lawyer during the court case, and that this was totally acceptable.) I'm actually more intrigued by the story that preceded this one in the canon. Apparently, Tom goes steampunk? I shall have to search it out.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Weathervane

    Fun little romp, and if I'm not mistaken the last written story featuring our friends Huck and Tom. I enjoyed these one-off tales -- the other being the fantastical Jules Verne-esque balloon ride Tom Sawyer Abroad -- and half-wish Twain had scribbled more of them, even knowing he was doing them for quick cash. But all things must come to an end eventually. Was good to know you boys, because there's nothing like reading Mark Twain adventures while you're in the middle of Mark Twain National Fores Fun little romp, and if I'm not mistaken the last written story featuring our friends Huck and Tom. I enjoyed these one-off tales -- the other being the fantastical Jules Verne-esque balloon ride Tom Sawyer Abroad -- and half-wish Twain had scribbled more of them, even knowing he was doing them for quick cash. But all things must come to an end eventually. Was good to know you boys, because there's nothing like reading Mark Twain adventures while you're in the middle of Mark Twain National Forest.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eimad

    The first time I ever heard of Tom Sawyer's name is from Lost TV series, perhaps as a tribute to Mark Twain judging from other character's name. Tom Sawyer has that likeable breadth of confidence flowing through him and completed with his intelligence and sharp eyes. I particularly enjoyed his "performance" if I may say that in the court. He certainly know how to work a crowd or as Huck Finn put it "the effect". The first time I ever heard of Tom Sawyer's name is from Lost TV series, perhaps as a tribute to Mark Twain judging from other character's name. Tom Sawyer has that likeable breadth of confidence flowing through him and completed with his intelligence and sharp eyes. I particularly enjoyed his "performance" if I may say that in the court. He certainly know how to work a crowd or as Huck Finn put it "the effect".

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    This one isn't really a novel, so it took only 75 minutes to read, which is good, because despite moments of wit and the always welcome voice of Huck Finn, this is a story that falls somewhere between Scooby Doo Where Are You and Murder She Wrote for fans of murder mystery. Pleasant enough, and I may have loved it at age 12, but I think it's the least of Twain's writing so far. Of course, I'm a terrible judge of YA literature, and that's really what this is. This one isn't really a novel, so it took only 75 minutes to read, which is good, because despite moments of wit and the always welcome voice of Huck Finn, this is a story that falls somewhere between Scooby Doo Where Are You and Murder She Wrote for fans of murder mystery. Pleasant enough, and I may have loved it at age 12, but I think it's the least of Twain's writing so far. Of course, I'm a terrible judge of YA literature, and that's really what this is.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Janelle

    I can see why this wasn't as successful as the first two books in the series. It took me a little while to get into it, I was a bit ho hum in the beginning. But I enjoyed it more as a went along. You have to stretch your mind a little to accept the plot. And of course, the book is a reflection of its times and setting. I can see why this wasn't as successful as the first two books in the series. It took me a little while to get into it, I was a bit ho hum in the beginning. But I enjoyed it more as a went along. You have to stretch your mind a little to accept the plot. And of course, the book is a reflection of its times and setting.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Debalina

    3.5 stars actually... the plot is pretty bland but I like th way Mark Twain writes even if the words, the spellings aren't exactly what we use today and the same goes for the sentence formation and the usage... but there is a little charm in the way the describes the world out there and the (around)1880s world lllooking back from the 21st century is nice to visit and spend time in... :) 3.5 stars actually... the plot is pretty bland but I like th way Mark Twain writes even if the words, the spellings aren't exactly what we use today and the same goes for the sentence formation and the usage... but there is a little charm in the way the describes the world out there and the (around)1880s world lllooking back from the 21st century is nice to visit and spend time in... :)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Duffy Pratt

    At least it's short. I probably would have thought this was OK if it didn't purport to be in Huck Finn's voice. As an ordinary short story, without Huck and Tom, it would be at least mildly diverting. But as a mash-up, it didn't work for me at all. But like I said, it's short. At least it's short. I probably would have thought this was OK if it didn't purport to be in Huck Finn's voice. As an ordinary short story, without Huck and Tom, it would be at least mildly diverting. But as a mash-up, it didn't work for me at all. But like I said, it's short.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Wonderful little Twain novella that gets you back in the mood for adventures. Tom's antics and Huck's musings are hilarious but brilliant! It's most all of the good elements of both previous boos squished into a hundred pages. Wonderful little Twain novella that gets you back in the mood for adventures. Tom's antics and Huck's musings are hilarious but brilliant! It's most all of the good elements of both previous boos squished into a hundred pages.

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    It is really not a good mystery story at all, and the only reason to really read this book at all is if you are a true Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn fan, and just want one more adventure with their typical high jinks.

  25. 5 out of 5

    John

    I actually liked this better than either TOM SAWYER (too childish) or HUCKLEBERRY FINN (too episodic). It comes across as a YA version of Sherlock Holmes, only set in the deep South.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Sutch

    I did not read this edition; I read the definitive edition published in the LOA volume of Twain's late novels. This book is of interest mainly because it shows later events in the lives of Tom Sawyer's relatives in Arkansas (who appeared in _Adventures of Huckleberry Finn_). It is an adventure story and one in which Tom Sawyer uncovers the identity of a murderer in rural Arkansas. The book is narrated by Huck Finn. Twain based the murder case and court testimony found in this novel on a real case I did not read this edition; I read the definitive edition published in the LOA volume of Twain's late novels. This book is of interest mainly because it shows later events in the lives of Tom Sawyer's relatives in Arkansas (who appeared in _Adventures of Huckleberry Finn_). It is an adventure story and one in which Tom Sawyer uncovers the identity of a murderer in rural Arkansas. The book is narrated by Huck Finn. Twain based the murder case and court testimony found in this novel on a real case he read about. Really, though, that's the only item of interest I found in the book. It's a fine mystery, but it telegraphs too many details of the case's solution before the big reveal scene in the final chapter to satisfy most mystery fans (I'm not particularly a fan of that genre, but even I could see what would happen as I reached about the 1/3 point in the text). The main problem with this book (it's better than its predecessor _Tom Sawyer Abroad_, but not much better) is Twain's acceptance and reproduction of southern racism and slavery. Yes, slavery existed at the time this novel is set, but the characters' use of the n-word makes this work problematic for most readers today (including me). It's thrown around much more casually than is warranted by the setting, and certainly Twain, given his documented opposition to slavery at least and racism more generally, could have done a better job of portraying that racism in more constructive ways (that was not his way, of course: he was raised in a slave state and internalized those values, which partly explains the problematic story line of _Huck Finn_). Worth a read, but not a reread probably.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Like a cheesy infomercial, Mark Twain could not help but say, "but wait there's more!" After The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain wrote a sequel called Tom Sawyer, Detective which was also the prequel to Tom Sawyer Abroad. Mark Twain used this book, and others, to entertain audiences everywhere. This entertainment is brought through Twain's ability to help remove the reader from their average lives and drop them into the life of Huck Finn. He starts the story with, "Well it was the nex Like a cheesy infomercial, Mark Twain could not help but say, "but wait there's more!" After The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain wrote a sequel called Tom Sawyer, Detective which was also the prequel to Tom Sawyer Abroad. Mark Twain used this book, and others, to entertain audiences everywhere. This entertainment is brought through Twain's ability to help remove the reader from their average lives and drop them into the life of Huck Finn. He starts the story with, "Well it was the next spring after me and Tom Sawyer set our old [friend] Jim free." (pg. 3) With this beginning phrase, the reader is able to drop their previous stresses and become Huck Finn for the duration of their reading time. The book is also entertaining because it shows the reader what life would be like if they were to act with mischief. Since mischief is a behavioral characteristic that is frowned upon by the general public, the reader can be entertained by the exercise of it in books. The way Huck and Tom act is the pure definition of mischief, making the book more entertaining for the reader. Finally, the use of mystery interspersed throughout the novel continues to the make the novel very interesting and entertaining. Huck says that, “If you’d lay out a mystery and a pie before me and him (Tom)... I will always run to the pie, whilst in his (Tom’s) nature he has always run to mystery.”(pg. 9)This suspense and mystery causes the reader to not want to put the book down and adding to the original purpose of entertaining the audience. This quote also foreshadows the mystery that is to take place later in the book as a character is killed in cold blood and jealousy. Jealousy is a major theme thought the book as the audience is taught that to be jealous of someone is very dangerous. One example of this is shown through the relationship between Jubiter and Silas. In the book it says, “Jubiter was working for Uncle Silas, and him and Uncle Silas quarreled all the time.” (pg. 11) This quarreling is derived from Uncle Silas’s refusal to marry his daughter to Jupiter's brother Brace even though Silas is the town parson. These arguments; however, lead to the town’s disfavor of Silas because that kind of conduct is looked down upon of a parson. Since the town is not in favor of Silas being the town parson, he is only hurting himself by refusing the marriage. This also shows that since Silas was jealous of Jubiter, it caused him to get a bad reputation in the town. Another theme conveyed in the book is that adventure is out there, you just have to look for it and act on it. One examples of this is, “From the very start me and Tom allowed that there was somebody sick in the stateroom next to ourn… by and by we asked about it.” (pg. 9) If the two boys had not acted upon this opportunity of suspicion they would not have been thrown into the adventure involving three con men and two stolen diamonds. The story of these men and the diamonds are all wrapped into Huck Finn’s life and adventures. His story is told in this book through a compilation of multiple styles and devices. First of all, this novel is a narration because it tells a story about this part of Huck Finn’s life and his adventures he takes with Tom Sawyer. One example of this is instead of using the phrases ‘once upon a time’ or ‘it was a dark and stormy night’ Twain begins the story with, “Well, it was the next spring after me and Tom Sawyer set our old [friend] Jim free.”(pg. 3) This sets up the novel as a type of story to be told and to grab the interest of the reader. Also, this quote sets the exposition and helps give the reader a sense of time if they read the books chronologically. One device that Twain uses to tell this story is dramatic irony. In the novel, Tom says, “Huck Finn, do you want me to let her SEE how bad I want to go? Why, she’d begin to doubt, right away, and imagine a lot of sicknesses and dangers and objections and first you know she’d take it all back.” (pg. 5) This is dramatic irony because the audience knows that tom Sawyer is actually very excited about going on the trip. He fools his aunt Polly, because she does not know that Tom is actually excited about it. This novel is also a very detailed description of the adventures that take place in Huck’s life. By using imagery, Twain helps the reader see the actions and feelings that are taking place in Huck’s life. One example of this is, “Don’t you know what this is? It’s spring fever… when you’ve got it , you want- oh, you don’t quite know what it is you DO want, but it is just fairly makes your heart ache, you want it so!” (pg. 4) When Twain uses the imagery to describe spring fever he transports the reader back to their feeling of longing for better weather that many people can relate to. This ability to relate back to the reader is why I partially enjoyed the book. Being that Huck is close to the same age as me and is telling the story in his perspective it allows me to relate to him much better that an adult. Such as in the beginning of the story, when Huck is describing Spring time most teens can relate to when he says, “getting closer and closer onto barefoot time every day…” (pg. 3) This relation of counting down the days to summer has a very strong connection to kids in school that count down the days till summer vacation. Also, the way Twain is able to keep the book filled with action keeps me engaged, unlike some of his other works. One example of this action is, “He jumped for the outside door and laid his ear against it and listened, pale and kind of panting. Presently he whispers: ‘Sounded like cocking a gun!’” (pg. 13) The way this scene is described, the reader cannot help but feel like they are a part of the scene and are left wanting to know what is going to happen next. This feeling left in me about wanting to read more is greatly appreciated because sometimes Twain’s writing can be slightly dry. Otherwise the book was fairly well written and had much less of the dreaded slang used in his other pieces.

  28. 5 out of 5

    TG Wolff

    The language of this story makes reading a delight. You can hear Twain's words rolling off the page. It's a short read and perfect pick me up. Huck Finn is the narrator and his misspeakings are AWESOME. Here are two of my favorites: The Diseased instead of The Deceased. The Prostitution instead of The Proscution. The language of this story makes reading a delight. You can hear Twain's words rolling off the page. It's a short read and perfect pick me up. Huck Finn is the narrator and his misspeakings are AWESOME. Here are two of my favorites: The Diseased instead of The Deceased. The Prostitution instead of The Proscution.

  29. 5 out of 5

    William Mc Callum

    Wonderful listening Due to eye issues Alexa reads to me, this is a will written novella book 4 in the series. The characters are interesting and fun. The story line is fast moving as the two main characters race to solve the crime. I would recommend this novella to Mark Twain fans. Enjoy reading 🔰 2021 ☺

  30. 5 out of 5

    Poppy

    Although the writing is as extraordinary as anything that Mark Twain wrote, the stories in this collection were not Twain's best. Yet I couldn't give less than 4 stars because, after all, the author is MARK TWAIN. 😉 Although the writing is as extraordinary as anything that Mark Twain wrote, the stories in this collection were not Twain's best. Yet I couldn't give less than 4 stars because, after all, the author is MARK TWAIN. 😉

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