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As I walked away from New Buildings, I found the man that Lewis had called "Tollers" sitting on one of the stone steps in front of the arcade. "How did you get on?" he asked. "I think rather well. I think he will be a most interesting tutor to have." "Interesting? Yes, he's certainly that," said the man, who I later learned was J. R. R. Tolkien. "You'll never get to the botto As I walked away from New Buildings, I found the man that Lewis had called "Tollers" sitting on one of the stone steps in front of the arcade. "How did you get on?" he asked. "I think rather well. I think he will be a most interesting tutor to have." "Interesting? Yes, he's certainly that," said the man, who I later learned was J. R. R. Tolkien. "You'll never get to the bottom of him." Over the next twenty-nine years, author George Sayer's first impression about C. S. Lewis proved true. He was interesting; but he was more than just that. He was a devout Christian, gifted literary scholar, best-selling author, and brilliant apologist. Sayer draws from a variety of sources, including his close friendship with Lewis and the million-word diary of Lewis's brother, to paint a portrait of the man whose friends knew him as Jack. Offering glimpses into Lewis's extraordinary relationships and experiences, Jack details the great scholar's life at the Kilns; days at Magdalen College; meetings with the Inklings; marriage to Joy Davidman Gresham; and the creative process that produced such world-famous works as the classic Chronicles of Narnia, Mere Christianity, and The Screwtape Letters. This book is an intimate account of the man who helped--and through his works, continues to help--generations hear and understand the heart of Christianity.


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As I walked away from New Buildings, I found the man that Lewis had called "Tollers" sitting on one of the stone steps in front of the arcade. "How did you get on?" he asked. "I think rather well. I think he will be a most interesting tutor to have." "Interesting? Yes, he's certainly that," said the man, who I later learned was J. R. R. Tolkien. "You'll never get to the botto As I walked away from New Buildings, I found the man that Lewis had called "Tollers" sitting on one of the stone steps in front of the arcade. "How did you get on?" he asked. "I think rather well. I think he will be a most interesting tutor to have." "Interesting? Yes, he's certainly that," said the man, who I later learned was J. R. R. Tolkien. "You'll never get to the bottom of him." Over the next twenty-nine years, author George Sayer's first impression about C. S. Lewis proved true. He was interesting; but he was more than just that. He was a devout Christian, gifted literary scholar, best-selling author, and brilliant apologist. Sayer draws from a variety of sources, including his close friendship with Lewis and the million-word diary of Lewis's brother, to paint a portrait of the man whose friends knew him as Jack. Offering glimpses into Lewis's extraordinary relationships and experiences, Jack details the great scholar's life at the Kilns; days at Magdalen College; meetings with the Inklings; marriage to Joy Davidman Gresham; and the creative process that produced such world-famous works as the classic Chronicles of Narnia, Mere Christianity, and The Screwtape Letters. This book is an intimate account of the man who helped--and through his works, continues to help--generations hear and understand the heart of Christianity.

30 review for Jack: A Life of C. S. Lewis

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fergus

    I read ‘Jack’ not long after I retired, fourteen years ago. I had become a C.S. Lewis groupie (and still am)! My membership in that exalted group had been confirmed during my initial post-cube-farm passion with Amazon, when I had (very wisely) invested some of my severance pay in the complete three-volume set of Lewis’ correspondence. But then - I only skimmed through THIS book at first, when it arrived in the mail. Horrors! WHAT TEMERITY! I said inwardly - that some so-called close friend would so I read ‘Jack’ not long after I retired, fourteen years ago. I had become a C.S. Lewis groupie (and still am)! My membership in that exalted group had been confirmed during my initial post-cube-farm passion with Amazon, when I had (very wisely) invested some of my severance pay in the complete three-volume set of Lewis’ correspondence. But then - I only skimmed through THIS book at first, when it arrived in the mail. Horrors! WHAT TEMERITY! I said inwardly - that some so-called close friend would so humanize this man, the Unimpeachable Icon of the Moral Majority, by displaying his foibles and follies! But you know, folks, life’s like that. No one’s perfect, no matter what Christian media might say or imply. We all expect our heroes to be really ROCK-SOLID people. But let’s just look at ourselves honestly - are WE ourselves really solid - through & through? More like shot full of holes! Right? And it’s unavoidable. BUT even an imperfect person can - with God’s help - make perfect their will, as T.S Eliot said. And to will with our Maker that the world be what it is, can be enough - for to inure ourselves to its imperfect essence is a necessary exercise in faith. And therein lies the rub! For living life simply, without all of its omnipresent bells and whistles and distractions is perhaps all the spiritual discipline we need. Our worlds are broken worlds - and so was Jack Lewis’. Our inheritance is a ruined estate. But we can try to make the best of a bad situation. Can any of us say more? Nor could Jack Lewis. After a tough childhood and even tougher time in the trenches of WWI Europe, no one could even hope that he could later rise above all the horrors of life amid the awful screams and silences of the Western Front completely. But rise above it he did! Later, his housemate brother would become utterly irresponsible and hopeless, as would their aging sometime friend and tenant... and then came the Blitz. Jack still held his head high! And still later, when his soulmate, wife and love of his life was snatched from him by death - still, after ordeal upon ordeal... He rose above it all! A great philosopher said that life’s not a spectacle, but an unremitting struggle. And so it was with Lewis. We tend to forget all that... when we discover a writer who can fight eternal duels, ford raging rivers of adversity, and dream our happiest dreams for us - all effortlessly! The Magician’s Nephew seems so magical... But just consider the ruin of our existence in which he first saw the light of day. While Lewis himself, on his own, seemed to ‘effortlessly’ - but in reality, only by overcoming Enormous Odds - create a World of Wonders in which the rest of us could recognize our destination and eternal home... And know it for the first time. So - Jack Lewis. Flawed? Just like the rest of us. But we can THANK him for showing us the Right Way in spite of his flaws... And for never giving up the struggle - AGAINST ALL ODDS.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    Quite a good biography of Lewis from a man who was his student and friend. Worthwhile.

  3. 4 out of 5

    J. Alfred

    Derek Brewer, one of Lewis' onetime pupils, records that a Cambridge professor once said that Lewis was "a very good man to whom goodness did not come easily." This biography seconds that opinion: it presents Lewis as having a troubled life, but one that was continuously offered up to the Lord as a sacrifice. In the appendix, written a decade after its intial publication, Sayer addresses several alternate biographies that had appeared of Lewis since: he says that the very real ugliness of much o Derek Brewer, one of Lewis' onetime pupils, records that a Cambridge professor once said that Lewis was "a very good man to whom goodness did not come easily." This biography seconds that opinion: it presents Lewis as having a troubled life, but one that was continuously offered up to the Lord as a sacrifice. In the appendix, written a decade after its intial publication, Sayer addresses several alternate biographies that had appeared of Lewis since: he says that the very real ugliness of much of Lewis' younger life was, for all practical purposes, exterminated from his later life by, as he quotes Lewis as saying, "prayer and fasting." After reading this, I have even more admiration for Lewis; having heard his story from someone less reticent about his virtues and more objective about his sins (can one be objective about anybody's sins?), he seems even more like an Augustine or a Paul to me: a powerful mind pulled from sin and self-centeredness to champion Christ.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I have been reading this book on and off since Thanksgiving. I love C.S. Lewis and was excited to read this biography. However, the author dwells too much on Lewis's sexuality and assumes too much about Lewis's writing. The personal tidbits were interesting. I can't say I cared much for the other analysis, however. Overall, a book I wanted to enjoy but can't really say I did. I definitely want to find something else on Lewis now.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    I liked the latter half of this better than the first. This biography was well done and it felt like it was written with love and respect for C. S. Lewis. The first half dealt with his childhood and his entrance into the adult world. C.S. Lewis, aka Jack, had some difficult things to endure. I've heard that he is the most oft quoted person in Christian religions. So I was kind of surprised to hear that he actually walked away from religion because of some things he was dealing with. But he came b I liked the latter half of this better than the first. This biography was well done and it felt like it was written with love and respect for C. S. Lewis. The first half dealt with his childhood and his entrance into the adult world. C.S. Lewis, aka Jack, had some difficult things to endure. I've heard that he is the most oft quoted person in Christian religions. So I was kind of surprised to hear that he actually walked away from religion because of some things he was dealing with. But he came back later in adulthood and wrote some amazing things. I liked the way the author presented the material in latter half. He went over what Jack was going through when writing specific books. It was well done. It made me want to go back and reread some of his books that I haven't touched in years.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carol Bakker

    This is a splendid biography of CSL by a friend and former student. His descriptions of Lewis' lectures makes me yearn to be transported to one. I found it fascinating the Sayer was present at the first face-to-face meeting between CSL and Joy Davidman. Sayer's assessment of Joy and of their marriage is tender and sympathetic. What bibliophile can help but love C.S. Lewis? Book buying was for him a lifelong habit. He knew that if he really liked a book, he would want to read it again and would f This is a splendid biography of CSL by a friend and former student. His descriptions of Lewis' lectures makes me yearn to be transported to one. I found it fascinating the Sayer was present at the first face-to-face meeting between CSL and Joy Davidman. Sayer's assessment of Joy and of their marriage is tender and sympathetic. What bibliophile can help but love C.S. Lewis? Book buying was for him a lifelong habit. He knew that if he really liked a book, he would want to read it again and would find new delights in it when he did. He would, therefore, have to own it. I long to have Jack's discernment. By and large, he formed his literary tastes in his teens and hardly altered them. Even then he had an astonishing gift for distinguishing the best from the second-rate. There were several laugh aloud moments, including what Lewis wrote to Sayers in a 1951 letter: I've just been having mumps. Humphrey [CSL's physician and friend] kept on quoting bits out of The Problem of Pain, which I call a bit thick.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Terje Fokstuen

    Jack is an affectionate biography of CS Lewis by George Sayer, once a student, then a friend, of Lewis. This is an engaging, and warm look at Lewis and his writing. Sayer lays out Lewis life, and books, but what ultimately comes across is the joy and faith that characterized so much of both the public and private man. Reading this I felt that I knew something of the man, and not just the dry facts of his life but rather a bit like we had a long chat over tea on a rainy day. Strongly recommended. Jack is an affectionate biography of CS Lewis by George Sayer, once a student, then a friend, of Lewis. This is an engaging, and warm look at Lewis and his writing. Sayer lays out Lewis life, and books, but what ultimately comes across is the joy and faith that characterized so much of both the public and private man. Reading this I felt that I knew something of the man, and not just the dry facts of his life but rather a bit like we had a long chat over tea on a rainy day. Strongly recommended. There are other, more objective and analytical books but this book is a the book of a friend and admirer. That is what gives it its' quality.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ian Adema

    By far the best biography I've read on C.S. Lewis. Gets down to who Jack was as a person beyond his writing in many ways people don't realize. A beautiful portrait of a famous author.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeannine

    Not much new here, but I wanted to get more personal info about Mr. Lewis and from someone other than himself (see Surprised By Joy). C.S. Lewis and his great friends have done an excellent job of keeping certain details of his life private, even decades after his death. Can't say that I blame him for his discretion (Louisa May Alcott, for example, entrusted her diaries and letters to a friend with the instruction they be destroyed upon her death. Well, yeah, you can read them all in various publ Not much new here, but I wanted to get more personal info about Mr. Lewis and from someone other than himself (see Surprised By Joy). C.S. Lewis and his great friends have done an excellent job of keeping certain details of his life private, even decades after his death. Can't say that I blame him for his discretion (Louisa May Alcott, for example, entrusted her diaries and letters to a friend with the instruction they be destroyed upon her death. Well, yeah, you can read them all in various published books! Egads!). Much of the material here (besides the personal accounts of the author) come from Lewis's letters (widely available) and there are many insights supposedly gleaned from Lewis's literary works (a practice Lewis himself disdained). I admit passing over many of these passages. I'd like to read a couple of the other biographies out there. I've enjoyed spending this winter reading Mr. Lewis and would like to hear more about him from friends and from D. Gresham (his stepson) who lived with Mr. Lewis for a few years after the death of his mother. That would certainly be an interesting perspective. Mr. Lewis was definitely an interesting and learned man who valued friendship, faith, good books, and good humor; this biography only increases the respect I have for him.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Justin Orman

    C.S. Lewis was first known to me through his children's books on Narnia. I've since become introduced to him as a Christian philosopher. As a biblical theologian, Lewis, by his own admission, was an amateur. As a thinker, he has few rivals. All biographies or books on history will be necessarily limited to the knowledge, perspective, and biases of the author. George Sayer was a close personal friend of Lewis. While his observations and comments on Lewis and his friends/family are fascinating, it C.S. Lewis was first known to me through his children's books on Narnia. I've since become introduced to him as a Christian philosopher. As a biblical theologian, Lewis, by his own admission, was an amateur. As a thinker, he has few rivals. All biographies or books on history will be necessarily limited to the knowledge, perspective, and biases of the author. George Sayer was a close personal friend of Lewis. While his observations and comments on Lewis and his friends/family are fascinating, it is difficult to know how much is colored by his relationship with Lewis. My favorite part of the book was Sayer's analysis of Lewis' writings. It whet my appetite for reading some of Lewis' works that I've yet to read. My rating is 4 *s. I took off a star because, as a biography, it is not terribly interesting to any who were not previously interested in Lewis.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nikolina Hansen

    Our Sunday School Class has used this book for a base of study of the many effects that CS Lewis has had on the Christian. It is the most comprehensive biography of CS "Jack" Lewis written by someone who actually knew him and spent time with him for over 30 years. Not only does it give the reader an understanding of what and why Lewis wrote like he did. It also gives a perspective of life during the early 20th century in England. I also gained a better understanding of much classical literature Our Sunday School Class has used this book for a base of study of the many effects that CS Lewis has had on the Christian. It is the most comprehensive biography of CS "Jack" Lewis written by someone who actually knew him and spent time with him for over 30 years. Not only does it give the reader an understanding of what and why Lewis wrote like he did. It also gives a perspective of life during the early 20th century in England. I also gained a better understanding of much classical literature because of the CS Lewis read volumns and Sayer talks about that too. A very worth while read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    This biography of C.S. Lewis appealed to me as a former student of literature and as a Christian. I learned a lot about C.S. Lewis, but above all I was amazed at his humility and kindness when he had such an awesome intelligence.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    A good general biography of Lewis, though perhaps a little obessessed with Lewis' sexual habits. I swear there was a whole chapter on whether or not Lewis and his wife had sex before they got married.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Justin Wiggins

    This is the best biography I have read on C.S.Lewis, and I have ready many. It was finally great to get around to reading it. I had been told really great things about it from friends, and from Lewis' step-son Douglas Gresham who is a very good friend of mine.

  15. 4 out of 5

    DD

    If you're going to read a biography on CS Lewis, this is the book to read! Written by a close friend who shares intimate details about his life, you really feel as if you know who CS Lewis was.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Richey

    This was a whole lot of fun. Sayer was a student and then a good friend of Lewis' and this acquaintance adds a great deal to make this an enjoyable read. Having just recently read McGrath's biography (which I also enjoyed), I have to say I prefer this one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Luke Mccarnan

    Like taking a walk with friends.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Warren

    I can't imagine a better biography of C S Lewis. George Sayer was a pupil of Lewis at Oxford and came to be one of the author's best friends. Over the years Mr Sayer even became a sort of advisor to Lewis and assisted him through his illness is later years as well as estate matters. George Sayer, also a professor, came to know Lewis's friends such as J R R Tolkien and others. He Researched and fully describes his childhood, his brother Warren's childhood and subsequent alcoholism, and everything I can't imagine a better biography of C S Lewis. George Sayer was a pupil of Lewis at Oxford and came to be one of the author's best friends. Over the years Mr Sayer even became a sort of advisor to Lewis and assisted him through his illness is later years as well as estate matters. George Sayer, also a professor, came to know Lewis's friends such as J R R Tolkien and others. He Researched and fully describes his childhood, his brother Warren's childhood and subsequent alcoholism, and everything about the man including his sex life and/or lack of one. Mr Sayer knew Joy Davidman Gresham and describes her moods and demeanor to a tee. Anyone who admires the work of C S Lewis will be interested to know that he did not have the comfortable life of a successful writer. God gave Lewis, as He does with most Christians, many challenges that only faith can overcome. Nevertheless, C S Lewis kept his sense of humor and his love of life and nature until the very end. George Sayer holds nothing back in this biography. He shows his love and admiration for his friend Lewis, but also gives insight to his faults and weaknesses.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    The beauty of his mind is what captivates people who read anything by C S Lewis. Reading his biography is like trying to see how and where that beauty came from. This biography, written by an intimate friend, shows that C S Lewis had a very unextraordinary life. He grew up, went to school, served in the military, hired on as a professor, gave lectures and wrote. None of these events show the beauty like the books he wrote. What they do show is that he was injured by an abusive teacher right afte The beauty of his mind is what captivates people who read anything by C S Lewis. Reading his biography is like trying to see how and where that beauty came from. This biography, written by an intimate friend, shows that C S Lewis had a very unextraordinary life. He grew up, went to school, served in the military, hired on as a professor, gave lectures and wrote. None of these events show the beauty like the books he wrote. What they do show is that he was injured by an abusive teacher right after his mother's death. His conflict of faith was only resolved after he kicked out some of his demons. There might be a strong correlation between his ideas and the books he read. The author mentions his favorites and how he reread them. Yes, he married in an unconventional sort of way. Marriage changed him for the better. I think it had an earthquake-like effect on him. I wish he had lived longer after marriage to write more. One characteristic that stood out more than once was his humility. Caution: This book covers the trauma he suffered and its effects. May not be suitable for children without parental supervision.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Carlson

    I found the book itself dry and boring, but the subject is interesting so I skimmed through much of it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Josh Wilson

    Sayers's book is insightful, informative and at times, funny. For someone interested in literature and literary interpretation, and especially of classical and medieval literature, this is a must-read, because of how Sayer highlights Lewis's literary influences and scholarly conversations. Sayer draws upon numerous first-hand experiences, conversations, and letters, but writes in a way that immerses the reader in Lewis's world. In fact the experience for me evoked the "longing" so central to Lew Sayers's book is insightful, informative and at times, funny. For someone interested in literature and literary interpretation, and especially of classical and medieval literature, this is a must-read, because of how Sayer highlights Lewis's literary influences and scholarly conversations. Sayer draws upon numerous first-hand experiences, conversations, and letters, but writes in a way that immerses the reader in Lewis's world. In fact the experience for me evoked the "longing" so central to Lewis's own enjoyment of good books. Reading this added to my understanding of Lewis the man. While I have to admit Lewis himself thought all criticism should be of a writer's work and not the writer himself, I think Lewis would appreciate the honesty of Sayer's book. There was little to suggest Lewis's life was flashy or fast-paced (which surprises no one familiar with his reading), but it was moving to read just how much of a "real" guy he was--an "obstinate toy soldier."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Meiser

    Great book written by a friend of C.S. Lewis that is really helpful in understanding the man, C.S. Lewis. Although he would reject this kind of literary criticism (calling it "the personal heresy), his biography sheds light on some of Lewis' writings for me. As a biography, this book seems mostly unbiased and does, in fact, cover some of Lewis' shortcomings and addresses all the main moral issues that are generally brought up regarding him. There are certainly things that I wish Sayer would have Great book written by a friend of C.S. Lewis that is really helpful in understanding the man, C.S. Lewis. Although he would reject this kind of literary criticism (calling it "the personal heresy), his biography sheds light on some of Lewis' writings for me. As a biography, this book seems mostly unbiased and does, in fact, cover some of Lewis' shortcomings and addresses all the main moral issues that are generally brought up regarding him. There are certainly things that I wish Sayer would have spent more time on, e.g. Jack's conversion, his relationship with Tolkien, the Inklings, but these may have detracted from his purposes. Other than those few things, I greatly enjoyed this honest attestation of God's work in the life of one of the most influential Christian writers of all time.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gavin Breeden

    A fascinating biography written by a student/friend of Lewis. I appreciated the fact that Sayer portrays Lewis with warts and all, not hesitating to point out his virtues and his flaws. At times, the book gets a bit bogged down describing in detail trips that Lewis took, the layout of his house, and stories he wrote as a child. Those things are probably only for the die hard Lewis fan. I'd have preferred more information on other things, like his friendship with J.R.R. Tolkien, for instance. Rea A fascinating biography written by a student/friend of Lewis. I appreciated the fact that Sayer portrays Lewis with warts and all, not hesitating to point out his virtues and his flaws. At times, the book gets a bit bogged down describing in detail trips that Lewis took, the layout of his house, and stories he wrote as a child. Those things are probably only for the die hard Lewis fan. I'd have preferred more information on other things, like his friendship with J.R.R. Tolkien, for instance. Reading about his faith and devotional practices was also very encouraging. All in all, a good book which paints a realistic picture of a man and the impact he had on 20th century literature and Christianity.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Huffstutler

    Of the several bios of Lewis that I've read, this is my very favorite. For some inexplicable reason, I feel like reading it every fall. Sayer was a student of Lewis's at Oxford, and the two became good friends until Lewis's death. Over the years, Lewis would periodically come stay with Sayer and his wife at Malvern so that the two men could take walking tours in the Malvern hills. Sayer includes a lot of great anecdotes. One of my favorite aspects of the book is that Sayer records in detail the Of the several bios of Lewis that I've read, this is my very favorite. For some inexplicable reason, I feel like reading it every fall. Sayer was a student of Lewis's at Oxford, and the two became good friends until Lewis's death. Over the years, Lewis would periodically come stay with Sayer and his wife at Malvern so that the two men could take walking tours in the Malvern hills. Sayer includes a lot of great anecdotes. One of my favorite aspects of the book is that Sayer records in detail the books that Lewis was reading over the course of his lifetime, and how those books affected him. I also enjoyed Sayer's recounting of Lewis's childhood and young adulthood. Great book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Becky Hintz

    Written by a former student and lifelong good friend, this biography was a sheer pleasure to read. Where other bios (McGrath's is excellent) do a great job of laying out the facts and timelines and settings and details of Lewis's life, this one allows the reader to know the man through the eyes of a friend. I particularly enjoyed the descriptions of his daily habits and routines, his love of walking and nature and ale and cheese, his take on relationships, and the thought processes behind his bo Written by a former student and lifelong good friend, this biography was a sheer pleasure to read. Where other bios (McGrath's is excellent) do a great job of laying out the facts and timelines and settings and details of Lewis's life, this one allows the reader to know the man through the eyes of a friend. I particularly enjoyed the descriptions of his daily habits and routines, his love of walking and nature and ale and cheese, his take on relationships, and the thought processes behind his books. If you already know C. S. Lewis, read this to meet Jack.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Charyla Olsen

    This book offers a pretty thorough biography of C. S. Lewis. I thought quite a bit of attention was paid to the dysfunctional aspects of his personality and it was a trifle disconcerting to think that someone so widely admired could have deep--and rather unresolved--psychological issues. However, it's also comforting to think that someone of the stature of C. S. Lewis managed to contribute a great deal to the world in spite his limitations. I would recommend it as one good biography of Lewis, bu This book offers a pretty thorough biography of C. S. Lewis. I thought quite a bit of attention was paid to the dysfunctional aspects of his personality and it was a trifle disconcerting to think that someone so widely admired could have deep--and rather unresolved--psychological issues. However, it's also comforting to think that someone of the stature of C. S. Lewis managed to contribute a great deal to the world in spite his limitations. I would recommend it as one good biography of Lewis, but it's always good to read several bios about a famous person just to get a more rounded view.

  27. 5 out of 5

    kelly

    This is one of my favorite biographies written about one of my favorite authors. One of the most fascinating parts is how he came to write the Narnia series. He was very proud of his logical argument to defend the existence of God (i.e. that naturalism is self-defeating) but was shattered after he lost (or so he felt) a debate with Cambridge philosopher. After that, he stopped writing apologetics, giving up on logic as a way to lead people to God and turned instead to reaching the heart through This is one of my favorite biographies written about one of my favorite authors. One of the most fascinating parts is how he came to write the Narnia series. He was very proud of his logical argument to defend the existence of God (i.e. that naturalism is self-defeating) but was shattered after he lost (or so he felt) a debate with Cambridge philosopher. After that, he stopped writing apologetics, giving up on logic as a way to lead people to God and turned instead to reaching the heart through story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adam Shields

    Short Review: A good biography of CS Lewis. The important part of the book is that it is written by a long time friend and former student of Lewis. He was actually there for much of what is being written about. He went with Lewis the first time Lewis met Joy. Lewis regularly visited their home. So this has memories, not just research. No biography is perfect, but if you are reading several biographies about Lewis, this is one that you should probably have on your list. My full review is on my blo Short Review: A good biography of CS Lewis. The important part of the book is that it is written by a long time friend and former student of Lewis. He was actually there for much of what is being written about. He went with Lewis the first time Lewis met Joy. Lewis regularly visited their home. So this has memories, not just research. No biography is perfect, but if you are reading several biographies about Lewis, this is one that you should probably have on your list. My full review is on my blog at http://bookwi.se/jack-a-life/

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shelli

    I really enjoyed this book and even though I am not a literary expert by any means, I was able to keep up most of the time. It is very thorough and because the author was a friend of Jack's, it felt very authentic and gave quite a view of some private issues of his life. I will keep this book and while reading more of C.S. Lewis' writing, I plan on returning to each section of his life that led to writing each particular work. Highly recommended.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jordan J. Andlovec

    Touching and personal, like hearing of a good friend over a glass of port. George Sayers nearly 30-year friendship with "Jack" gives us a window into "the patron saint of evangelicalism" that no other biography does. It shows the warm, richly gracious man who is often seen as an untouchable intellectual giant.

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