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Letters to Children

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In his life, C.S. Lewis received thousands of letters from young fans who were eager for more knowledge of his bestselling Narnia books and their author. Here are collected many of his responses to those letters, in which he shares his feelings about writing, school, animals, and of course, Narnia. Lewis writes to the children - as he wrote for them - with understanding an In his life, C.S. Lewis received thousands of letters from young fans who were eager for more knowledge of his bestselling Narnia books and their author. Here are collected many of his responses to those letters, in which he shares his feelings about writing, school, animals, and of course, Narnia. Lewis writes to the children - as he wrote for them - with understanding and respect, proving why he remains one of the best-loved children's authors of all time.


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In his life, C.S. Lewis received thousands of letters from young fans who were eager for more knowledge of his bestselling Narnia books and their author. Here are collected many of his responses to those letters, in which he shares his feelings about writing, school, animals, and of course, Narnia. Lewis writes to the children - as he wrote for them - with understanding an In his life, C.S. Lewis received thousands of letters from young fans who were eager for more knowledge of his bestselling Narnia books and their author. Here are collected many of his responses to those letters, in which he shares his feelings about writing, school, animals, and of course, Narnia. Lewis writes to the children - as he wrote for them - with understanding and respect, proving why he remains one of the best-loved children's authors of all time.

30 review for Letters to Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Susan Budd

    C. S. Lewis was a special soul, one of those rare people who retain the best of youth even into old age. He had a rapport with children that was surely the product of his own child-like nature. In his essay, “On Three Ways of Writing for Children,” he recounts an anecdote that, I think, provides some insight into his ability to speak to children as fluently and naturally as he does: “I have been told that Arthur Mee never met a child and never wished to: it was, from his point of view, a bit of C. S. Lewis was a special soul, one of those rare people who retain the best of youth even into old age. He had a rapport with children that was surely the product of his own child-like nature. In his essay, “On Three Ways of Writing for Children,” he recounts an anecdote that, I think, provides some insight into his ability to speak to children as fluently and naturally as he does: “I have been told that Arthur Mee never met a child and never wished to: it was, from his point of view, a bit of luck that boys liked reading what he liked writing” (On Stories, 32). Now, unlike Mee, Lewis did know children and he had affectionate relationships with them. But the second part of that statement, that boys liked reading what Mee liked writing, I do believe can be applied to Lewis. He simply liked writing the kind of stories that children like reading. As he says of his children’s books, “I put in what I would have liked to read when I was a child and what I still like reading now that I am in my fifties” (On Stories, 31). But no one who reads Lewis could possibly doubt this. One has only to read some of the essays collected in On Stories to see that Lewis was unabashedly fond of fairy tales, fantasy, and science fiction. When he wasn’t gushing over the fantasies of George MacDonald, he was singing the praises of E. Nesbit, J. R. R. Tolkien, and David Lindsay. With this in mind, it ceases to be surprising that a bachelor should get along so well with children. After all, parenthood does not automatically confer insight into the minds of children. Lewis gets along with children because he has never stopped being one. As he says to Phyllida: “Parts of me are still 12” (34). And that is what makes Letters to Children such a delight. Lewis writes to his young correspondents much as he would to adults. He respects their intelligence. He never condescends or preaches. And he takes their questions, concerns, and ideas seriously. Of course, he doesn’t write to children exactly as he might to an adult. In his letter to Francine, for example, he says that his experiences in boarding school were “too horrid to tell anyone of your age” (102). Naturally he considers the innocence of children. But other than the omissions anyone with common sense would make when communicating with children, he writes simply as one person to another. Many of the children who wrote to him thanked him for his books and asked questions about Narnia, including some rather deep theological questions, but some of his most charming letters are those that show Lewis at his most child-like. He shares with his goddaughter Sarah a poem he wrote about a rabbit that lives in the wood by his college. The little fellow, who Lewis calls Baron Biscuit, stood up and put his front paws on Lewis while Lewis was feeding him (21-22). There’s nothing like a cute anecdote involving a rabbit to endear someone to me. But that’s not all. He expresses his fondness for mice, which he never ever sets traps for in his room (32), thinks having a horse would be much better than having cars or planes (37), and suggests that if guinea pigs could talk they’d speak German (57). I have but one complaint to make about this book and it has nothing to do with Lewis himself, but rather the editors Marjorie Lamp Mead and Lyle Wesley Dorsett. In their annotated bibliography they list The Chronicles of Narnia in the new order and claim that this is “the order in which Lewis preferred that they be read” (115). Since this is the book that includes the letter that started all this baloney, this review is the place for me to get up on my soapbox and denounce it. So here goes. The only evidence that Lewis wanted his books reordered to convey a chronological history of Narnia ~ the sole piece of evidence ~ is a letter he wrote in reply to an eleven year old boy named Laurence on April 23, 1957. Little Laurence suggested that the seven books be read in chronological order and Lewis replied “I think I agree with your order for reading the books more than with your mother’s” (68). (Laurence’s mother believed they should be read in publication order.) Lewis goes on to say that when he wrote The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, he had no intention to write any more Narnia books. “So perhaps it does not matter very much in which order anyone reads them” (68). The decision to reorder these books, then, hinges on nothing more than a letter Lewis wrote to a child. He lived for six more years after writing this letter, yet in those six years he did not make the change. If he really did prefer chronological order, why didn’t he make the change? Could it be that he didn’t actually have a preference for chronological order? That perhaps he was simply acknowledging and validating the preference of a clever child? Earlier I said that Lewis writes to children much as he would to adults, that he doesn’t condescend to them, and my own statement might be used against me to claim that Lewis would not have validated Laurence’s preference if he didn’t truly agree with it. However, I do not believe there is a contradiction here. To be polite is not to condescend. Lewis does sometimes disagree with the children who write to him. In particular, he critiques Joan’s stories and poems, often giving her practical writing advice (80, 87, 103). He does this with sensitivity to the young writer’s feelings. But his correspondence with Laurence is quite different. Laurence is not submitting his own writing to Lewis for appraisal. He is expressing a preference for reading in chronological order. There is no reason for this preference to be criticized. I can’t imagine Lewis writing: ‘Dear Laurence, How positively stupid of you to read the books in chronological order. Stop doing so immediately. Yours, C. S. Lewis.’ Furthermore, if the argument that a single comment in a letter to a child is to be taken as proof of the author’s preference, then what of this comment he makes to Penny on April 13, 1957: “Thanks for your letter and the pictures. You draw donkeys better than Pauline Baynes does” (67)? Should the illustrations by Pauline Baynes be replaced by little Penny’s drawings? In a letter to Martin on January 22, 1957, clearly in response to some question or concern Martin had about Susan Pevensie, Lewis writes: “... perhaps she will get to Aslan’s country in the end ...” (67). This comment is written by Lewis after the final Narnia book had been published. Should The Chronicles of Narnia be rewritten to include Susan getting to Aslan’s country? Lewis always encourages the children in their creativity and I think his comment to Laurence should be read in the same vein as his comments to Penny and Martin. The editors of Letters to Children include a footnote to the letter to Laurence that says “Lewis later reaffirmed his preference for Laurence’s sequence” (68). They cite Walter Hooper’s book Past Watchful Dragons. There Hopper writes: “However, the right sequence as Lewis caused me to copy it down is this: The Magician’s Nephew (1955), The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950), The Horse and His Boy (1954), Prince Caspian (1951), The Voyage of the ‘Dawn Treader’ (1952), The Silver Chair (1953), and The Last Battle (1956)” (32). But only a little later Hooper writes: “For the purpose of following, as it were, the mental processes of the author, I have chosen to summarize the books in the order in which they were written” (32-33). That order, of course, is the one generations of Narnia fans experienced, the one that begins with the Pevensie children discovering the entrance to Narnia in the old wardrobe, a discovery spoilt by reading The Magician’s Nephew first. To my mind, Hooper’s statement that Lewis considered Laurence’s order to be the “right sequence” is undermined by his decision to summarize the books in publication order. By doing so, he demonstrates that the order in which Lewis wrote the books is the best order to experience the books. By reading the books in the order that presents “the mental processes of the author,” the reader experiences what Lewis experienced, the reader discovers Narnia as Lewis discovered Narnia. And isn’t that what we want? Don’t we want the magical experience that Lewis had when he discovered in his mind the “picture of a Faun carrying an umbrella and parcels in a snowy wood” (On Stories 53)? Now I’m not saying that someone who decides to read the books in chronological order is doing anything wrong. What I am saying is that chronological order should not be presented to new readers as the “right sequence” to read the books. If I had not read these books in the 70s, if I were a newbie and I read that the author preferred the books to be read in chronological order, I would have definitely read them in chronological order. After all, I would say to myself, who better to tell me how to experience these books than their author? The result would have been that the magical discovery of Narnia through the eyes of the Pevensie children would have been lost. Rereaders might enjoy reading the prequel first, but first time readers should not be robbed of the experience of discovery. Prequels, by their nature, are not meant to be read first. On the contrary, prequels come into being when the history of something comes to be of interest and this only happens after that something is already known and loved. Only then does one ask, how did this come to be? I wonder if next we will all be told to read The Silmarillion before The Hobbit.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Rollins

    I just love Lewis. If he writes it, I read it. These letters are especially chatty and full of life. In fact, being a somewhat over the top Lewis fan, I even cried when the letters were on my birthday, and as if I did not know the ending of the story I cried at the end too. There was something emotional about reading letters a person wrote not knowing their own expiration date. Maybe we are doing that very thing right now. One of the most interesting aspects of the book is Lewis's letters to a y I just love Lewis. If he writes it, I read it. These letters are especially chatty and full of life. In fact, being a somewhat over the top Lewis fan, I even cried when the letters were on my birthday, and as if I did not know the ending of the story I cried at the end too. There was something emotional about reading letters a person wrote not knowing their own expiration date. Maybe we are doing that very thing right now. One of the most interesting aspects of the book is Lewis's letters to a young writer named Joan. He treats almost as an adult Inkling in his no-holds-barred reviews of her writing. I wonder what became of Joan. She didn't seem to give up after some very hard words from Lewis. They wrote back and forth over many years. Where are you, Joan?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gary Reads

    I really enjoyed this book. C. S. Lewis in my opinion is a great author. The letters that he wrote back to the children were very understandable. My favorite was when he explained how to pronounce Aslan and the meaning of him. I would recommend this book to anyone young or old.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Satisfying and lovely. I don't have many cohesive thoughts, just warmth and satisfaction from reading it. Lewis's letters are encouraging, instructive, and occasionally just about mundane things like the weather. I love how often he encourages children to write their own Narnia stories. He answers lots of questions about the Narnia books which is nice because every fangirl wants that little bit of more. I love how intelligently he writes to children. He peppers his letters with references to othe Satisfying and lovely. I don't have many cohesive thoughts, just warmth and satisfaction from reading it. Lewis's letters are encouraging, instructive, and occasionally just about mundane things like the weather. I love how often he encourages children to write their own Narnia stories. He answers lots of questions about the Narnia books which is nice because every fangirl wants that little bit of more. I love how intelligently he writes to children. He peppers his letters with references to other books and texts. I love that he preferred Till We Have Faces so much because that is my favorite. It really is delightful that all his words of wisdom to these particular children are available for all children. I am so glad I own this one. I foresee many happy re-reads in the future.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    As you can imagine, C. S. Lewis had many young fans who loved his books, especially the Chronicles of Narnia. And many of those kids wrote to him, some of them repeatedly! In fact, he carried on a years-long correspondence with quite a number of young people, even critiquing stories they sent him and so on. Now, some of these letters were from his godchildren, or the children of friends, but many are from complete strangers. And the kindness, the warmth, the compassion, and the understanding that As you can imagine, C. S. Lewis had many young fans who loved his books, especially the Chronicles of Narnia. And many of those kids wrote to him, some of them repeatedly! In fact, he carried on a years-long correspondence with quite a number of young people, even critiquing stories they sent him and so on. Now, some of these letters were from his godchildren, or the children of friends, but many are from complete strangers. And the kindness, the warmth, the compassion, and the understanding that he showed them just... endeared him to me in a way I was not expecting. Lewis clearly remembered what it had been like to BE a child, and since that's something I also vividly recall, I feel a kinship to him now. This is a wonderful collection, and I loved it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bekah

    I envy these children their luck in corresponding with Lewis. The brilliant man died when my mother was only five years old, so I missed out by miles in my chance, but it was wonderful to read these collected responses. Lewis was so humble in receiving praise and encouraging to those who expressed an interest in writing. I was thoroughly impressed by his discussion of theology, how he never spoke down to any of these children, never tried to dumb things down. It also amused me that he even encou I envy these children their luck in corresponding with Lewis. The brilliant man died when my mother was only five years old, so I missed out by miles in my chance, but it was wonderful to read these collected responses. Lewis was so humble in receiving praise and encouraging to those who expressed an interest in writing. I was thoroughly impressed by his discussion of theology, how he never spoke down to any of these children, never tried to dumb things down. It also amused me that he even encouraged his young fans to write fanfiction, for lack of a better term, stating "...there will be no more of these stories. But why don't you try to write one yourself? ...and if you try, I'm sure you will find it great fun." He seems like he was a wonderful man and I am glad that I am at least lucky enough to know him through him many works.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Pure joy. This is my second time through this little volume of letters and it is just as enjoyable as last time. Lewis’ letters here contain a lot of compassion, clarifying bits about Narnia, and one particularly moving letter to a boy who was afraid he was loving Aslan more than Jesus. It’s odd to read someone else’s mail, but it helps you really get to know Lewis.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    If you don’t already love C.S. Lewis (and you really should), this little book will make you crazy about him. It’s a selection from hundreds of letters he wrote to children from all over the world in response to their questions and comments about his books—mostly the Narnia series. Some of the letters he wrote just after his wife passed away, and he was still so thoughtful. . He was the perfect correspondent! Listen to this: . “Dear [Children], “Thank both Martin and Micky for their nice letters. Do If you don’t already love C.S. Lewis (and you really should), this little book will make you crazy about him. It’s a selection from hundreds of letters he wrote to children from all over the world in response to their questions and comments about his books—mostly the Narnia series. Some of the letters he wrote just after his wife passed away, and he was still so thoughtful. . He was the perfect correspondent! Listen to this: . “Dear [Children], “Thank both Martin and Micky for their nice letters. Do you mean Miriam _fell_ into the stove? ‘Was put on’ sounds as if you did it on purpose—were you thinking of having her for dinner? I do hope she will soon be better. Burns are horrid.” & “Dear Fifth Graders,” “... I am tall, fat, rather bald, red-faced, double-chinned, black-haired, have a deep voice, and wear glasses for reading.” . My favorite thing was that he addressed a few of the questions I have always had about the Narnia series, like this: “ I feel sure I’m right to make them grow up in Narnia. Of course they will grow up in this world too...You see, I don’t think age matters so much as people think. Parts of me are still 12 and I think other parts were already 50 when I was 12: so I don’t feel it v.[ery] odd that they grow up in Narnia while they are children in England.” . What a delightful man!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rissie

    I love this book. It’s a small collection of C.S. Lewis’ responses to letters that children wrote to him about his Narnia books. The letters are so nice … he takes the children and their news/concerns/ideas seriously and responds to them with interest and concern – as though he were responding to an adult. I’d love to get a letter like that even now!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    I thoroughly enjoyed this slight volume. The intimate and mundane details of Lewis' life are fascinating to me, and it is always helpful to see how others write letters. I'm afraid my letters are rather pedestrian. I highly recommend this book!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christine Seibert

    What a joy to read C.S. Lewis' words of wisdom to his young readers. He encourages and challenges them, but always in a tone that respects them as equals. As expected he is winsome and kind. The letters humanize Lewis and made me sad that he is not still on this earth. *Note: I have an edition of this book from 1985. Not sure how different it is from this version, but I'm sure it is similar so I'm counting recording it here!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jon Beadle

    How charming! Lewis thought it a shame that the dog sent to space didn’t return with super-intelligence and try to conquer man; that _Till We Have Faces_ was his best novel (even though it was a critical and commercial flop!); that Joyce was overrated, and Nietzsche a better poet than philosopher. Little tie bits like these make this thin volume worth a read for every true fan.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    Okay, so on top of everything else, the man answered his fan-mail. WHY WAS HE PERFECT?!?! (All right, so he wasn't perfect, but sometimes I feel like I'm dangerously close to putting him on that pedestal.)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mwrogers

    Of course I would rate this book 5 stars, as I do nearly everything CS Lewis. It is very touching to know that this busy and brilliant college professor did not think it beneath him to answer children’s letters. I also loved it when he closed his letter asking the child to pray for him. What a blessing this man was (and still is!) for us on this side of Narnia.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    What a delight this was to read!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    A wonderful glimpse behind the curtain full of insights into CSL’s thought processes. I’m terribly sorry I never got to sit with him over a pint to discuss Perelandra.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Choat

    C.S. Lewis, in addition to being a prolific writer of scholarly works, poems, Christian apologetics, and fiction, carried on extensive correspondence. He considered it a solemn duty to personally answer each of the thousands of letters he received – and not perfunctory, generic, “Thank you for writing; I wish you well.” The responses he penned are truly personal and specific, giving detailed thanks for small gifts, carefully answering questions asked, and thoughtfully addressing whatever issues C.S. Lewis, in addition to being a prolific writer of scholarly works, poems, Christian apologetics, and fiction, carried on extensive correspondence. He considered it a solemn duty to personally answer each of the thousands of letters he received – and not perfunctory, generic, “Thank you for writing; I wish you well.” The responses he penned are truly personal and specific, giving detailed thanks for small gifts, carefully answering questions asked, and thoughtfully addressing whatever issues the writer had mentioned. Although the letters in this volume are directed to children of varying ages, they are not condescending or dismissive; rather, they demonstrate Lewis’ aptitude for maintaining a sincere, child-like outlook and empathy for the concerns of the young. Quite a few of the missives collected here contain praise and/or constructive criticism for the samples of their own artwork and writing which correspondents had sent Lewis, either as gifts or seeking advice. Another frequent topic is, of course, books: questions and comments about the Chronicles of Narnia and the Space Trilogy, as well as discussion of stories both parties had read and recommendations for further reading. The fact that these letters were originally written to children by no means indicates that only children will find them interesting. They offer glimpses of the author’s personality, gems of insight, and even practical writing tips that adult readers will appreciate as well.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    Given how young I was when I first fell in love with Narnia and began to deeply admire C.S. Lewis, it is little wonder that I thoroughly enjoyed the book “C.S. Lewis: Letters to Children.” This wonderful, beautiful compilation of letters he wrote between 1944-1963 to children, including many Americans, paints a lovely picture of a man I’ve never met, but who is, in my imagination, a dear friend. So sentimental in tone, I got a bit teary-eyed at how gentle and sweet he was to his many young fans. Given how young I was when I first fell in love with Narnia and began to deeply admire C.S. Lewis, it is little wonder that I thoroughly enjoyed the book “C.S. Lewis: Letters to Children.” This wonderful, beautiful compilation of letters he wrote between 1944-1963 to children, including many Americans, paints a lovely picture of a man I’ve never met, but who is, in my imagination, a dear friend. So sentimental in tone, I got a bit teary-eyed at how gentle and sweet he was to his many young fans. The conversations Lewis has in his letters are widely varied. Some letters are simply thank-you notes in response to fan letters. In some cases he carries on a long-standing correspondence over many years with a child or family of children. He offers educational advice to some children ; comforts and encourages children with their worries; tells many behind-the-scenes details about his Narnian characters; and shares interesting personal details about his own life (his marriage, his wife’s severe illness, his home life). All the while, he speaks to the children in gentle, respectful, and never-condescending tones. It is often said that it is best not to meet one’s heroes, as they are sure to disappoint. Letters to Children makes me feel as if I have been given the opportunity of meeting one of my heroes and, rather than being disappointed, I find he exceeds my every expectation.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    Very interesting. Who knew that C S Lewis disliked Cicero, read Pride and Prejudice numerous times, and agreed the Chronicles of Narnia should be read beginning with "The Magician's Nephew" and ending with "The Last Battle"? An order, by the way, I would also recommend. I didn't read all the letters and it was very short, so I won't be counting this one for my annual book challenge. Things that could have made it better: Letters FROM the children rather than only letters TO the children(apparentl Very interesting. Who knew that C S Lewis disliked Cicero, read Pride and Prejudice numerous times, and agreed the Chronicles of Narnia should be read beginning with "The Magician's Nephew" and ending with "The Last Battle"? An order, by the way, I would also recommend. I didn't read all the letters and it was very short, so I won't be counting this one for my annual book challenge. Things that could have made it better: Letters FROM the children rather than only letters TO the children(apparently C S Lewis didn't like the word kids, so I will refrain from using it here :D), and if the editor had cut out the short bio at the beginning. This is mostly just my personal opinion, though, because I've been in a C S Lewis kick lately and figured the bio wouldn't tell me anything I didn't already know. Things I Really Liked: Oh, where to begin, these letters are so sweet! It really makes one appreciate his dedication and concern for each of his fans. Ex. Critiquing poems, paintings, and stories they sent him. Also promising to pray for one mother who worried her son loved Aslan more than God and aksing them to keep him in their prayers as well. I guess that pretty much sums it up! Great read for any C S Lewis fan.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Miss Clark

    Wonderful book, with plenty of neat details and facts, esp. about his Narnia series. Excerpts: 22 January 1977 Dear Martin, The books don't tell us what happened to Susan. She is left alive in this world at the end, having by then turned into a rather silly, conceited young woman. But there is plenty of time for her to mend, and perhaps she will get to Aslan's country in the end - in her own way. I think that whatever she had seen in Narnia she could (if she was the sort that wanted to) persuade he Wonderful book, with plenty of neat details and facts, esp. about his Narnia series. Excerpts: 22 January 1977 Dear Martin, The books don't tell us what happened to Susan. She is left alive in this world at the end, having by then turned into a rather silly, conceited young woman. But there is plenty of time for her to mend, and perhaps she will get to Aslan's country in the end - in her own way. I think that whatever she had seen in Narnia she could (if she was the sort that wanted to) persuade herself, as she grew up, that is was "all nonsense." "As to whether or not they knew their Creed, I suppose Professor Kirke and the Lady Polly and the Pevensies did, but probably Eustace and Pole, who had been brought up at that rotten school did not."

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    I first read this collection about fifteen years ago, and at that time I'd only read the Narnia books once and had no exposure to Lewis's other works. This reading, of course, proved a far richer experience. I think the best aspect is witnessing how Lewis expressed his fierce intellect and deep theological understanding in simple language. Case in point, what he says about being who God created you to be in the body of Christ: "A good toenail is not an unsuccessful attempt at a hair; and if it w I first read this collection about fifteen years ago, and at that time I'd only read the Narnia books once and had no exposure to Lewis's other works. This reading, of course, proved a far richer experience. I think the best aspect is witnessing how Lewis expressed his fierce intellect and deep theological understanding in simple language. Case in point, what he says about being who God created you to be in the body of Christ: "A good toenail is not an unsuccessful attempt at a hair; and if it were conscious, it would delight in being simply a good toenail." And this, on the principle that love is the fulfilling of the law: "A perfect man would never act from a sense of duty; he'd always want the right thing more than the wrong one. Duty is only a substitute for love (of God and of other people), like a crutch, which is the substitute for a leg."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book! I reluctantly settled for it when, after deciding to read all of Lewis, I couldn't find many of his more well-known works at the local library. I was pleasantly surprised. Furthermore, it was a little fortuitous that I read this before any of his great works; I feel it served as a nice introduction to the author beforehand! What I especially loved was that it became clear to me through his letters that he was a down-to-earth person despite his success and fame. Al I thoroughly enjoyed this book! I reluctantly settled for it when, after deciding to read all of Lewis, I couldn't find many of his more well-known works at the local library. I was pleasantly surprised. Furthermore, it was a little fortuitous that I read this before any of his great works; I feel it served as a nice introduction to the author beforehand! What I especially loved was that it became clear to me through his letters that he was a down-to-earth person despite his success and fame. Also, I believe, he was a little melancholy despite the fame as well. I would have liked to have known the man -not the famous author- the man.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stan Shelley

    What a marvelous book. Normally I have to really slow down to read CS Lewis but this one reads like a breeze...because, of course, it is letters to children. Lewis writes in a way that is accessible to them but at the same time he does not talk down to them. He is just full of Christian kindness. He answers their questions, give advice if it was requested and seems to genuinely care. The letter he wrote to the little boy who was concerned that he loved Aslan more than Jesus was priceless. And he What a marvelous book. Normally I have to really slow down to read CS Lewis but this one reads like a breeze...because, of course, it is letters to children. Lewis writes in a way that is accessible to them but at the same time he does not talk down to them. He is just full of Christian kindness. He answers their questions, give advice if it was requested and seems to genuinely care. The letter he wrote to the little boy who was concerned that he loved Aslan more than Jesus was priceless. And he sometimes ended letters with requests that the children pray for him. This is so touching.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    I flew through this book - and when I finished C.S. Lewis became more like a grandfather to me. I have always reveled in his literary genius and theological mind. Yet, to read these letters, I saw quite clearly his passion and love for children. Why else would he painstakingly write letters encouraging and teaching those brave souls who were faithful to correspond? I only wish I had lived at that time to receive even a nugget of wisdom or jest from this wonderful man!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    A collection of letters from CS written to children from around the world. This book makes me want to meet CS Lewis even more than I ever did before. He is so frank, and so open, and so honest in his letters and he so obviously enjoys observing things from a child-like viewpoint, and intellectual discourse even with children... I wish he was still alive when I was young so I could have written to him.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Brist

    What a wonderful book. I am so grateful that these editors took the massive amount of time and work that it must have taken to compile these very insightful and meaningful letters of C.S. Lewis. I now feel like I understand this man more even after reading his semi-autobiography ("Surprised by Joy.") I learned, I laughed, and by the end I definitely cried. Five stars.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ginnie

    If you ever wanted to ask C.S. Lewis a question it's very possible you will find the answer to those questions it this book. Written in a simple way with little illustrations from his own hand I recommend this to all Lewis fans.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Zack Mollhagen

    A lovely reminder of the gentleness and respect that Lewis had for children. This book shows that Lewis held Christ's teaching dear, "Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these" (Mathew 19:14).

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kendall

    Really good. I think that Lewis, in writing to children, is not trying to prove anything; he simply says what he thinks. This gives these letters an aphoristic quality, almost like a collection of proverbs.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    Good.

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