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A New York Times Editor’s Pick “It is a blunt observation, reflective of the potent message she delivers to her readers, a skillful unraveling of the myth of the submissive Muslim woman and a timely introduction to those other, very American and largely unheard 9/11 kids who bear the destructive burden of that one day, every day.” —The New York Times Book Review Required r A New York Times Editor’s Pick “It is a blunt observation, reflective of the potent message she delivers to her readers, a skillful unraveling of the myth of the submissive Muslim woman and a timely introduction to those other, very American and largely unheard 9/11 kids who bear the destructive burden of that one day, every day.” —The New York Times Book Review Required reading from the founder of MuslimGirl.com—a harrowing and candid memoir about coming of age as a Muslim American in the wake of 9/11, during the never-ending war on terror, and through the Trump era of casual racism. At nine years old, Amani Al-Khatahtbeh watched from her home in New Jersey as two planes crashed into the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. That same year, she heard her first racial slur. At age eleven, when the United States had begun to invade Iraq and the television was flooded with anti-Muslim commentary, Amani felt overwhelmed with feelings of intense alienation from American society. At thirteen, her family took a trip to her father’s native homeland of Jordan, and Amani experienced firsthand a culture built on pure religion, not Islamic stereotypes. Inspired by her trip and after years of feeling like her voice as a Muslim woman was marginalized and neglected during a time when all the media could talk about was, ironically, Muslim women, Amani created a website called MuslimGirl. As the editor-in-chief, she put together a team of Muslim women and started a life dedicated to activism. This is the extraordinary account of Amani’s journey through adolescence as a Muslim girl, from the Islamophobia she’s faced on a daily basis, to the website she launched that became a cultural phenomenon, to the nation’s political climate in the 2016 election cycle with Donald Trump as the Republican nominee. While dispelling the myth that a headscarf makes you a walking target for terrorism, she shares both her own personal accounts and anecdotes from the “sisterhood” of writers that serve as her editorial team at MuslimGirl. Amani’s honest, urgent message is fresh, timely, and a deeply necessary counterpoint to the current rhetoric about the Middle East.


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A New York Times Editor’s Pick “It is a blunt observation, reflective of the potent message she delivers to her readers, a skillful unraveling of the myth of the submissive Muslim woman and a timely introduction to those other, very American and largely unheard 9/11 kids who bear the destructive burden of that one day, every day.” —The New York Times Book Review Required r A New York Times Editor’s Pick “It is a blunt observation, reflective of the potent message she delivers to her readers, a skillful unraveling of the myth of the submissive Muslim woman and a timely introduction to those other, very American and largely unheard 9/11 kids who bear the destructive burden of that one day, every day.” —The New York Times Book Review Required reading from the founder of MuslimGirl.com—a harrowing and candid memoir about coming of age as a Muslim American in the wake of 9/11, during the never-ending war on terror, and through the Trump era of casual racism. At nine years old, Amani Al-Khatahtbeh watched from her home in New Jersey as two planes crashed into the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. That same year, she heard her first racial slur. At age eleven, when the United States had begun to invade Iraq and the television was flooded with anti-Muslim commentary, Amani felt overwhelmed with feelings of intense alienation from American society. At thirteen, her family took a trip to her father’s native homeland of Jordan, and Amani experienced firsthand a culture built on pure religion, not Islamic stereotypes. Inspired by her trip and after years of feeling like her voice as a Muslim woman was marginalized and neglected during a time when all the media could talk about was, ironically, Muslim women, Amani created a website called MuslimGirl. As the editor-in-chief, she put together a team of Muslim women and started a life dedicated to activism. This is the extraordinary account of Amani’s journey through adolescence as a Muslim girl, from the Islamophobia she’s faced on a daily basis, to the website she launched that became a cultural phenomenon, to the nation’s political climate in the 2016 election cycle with Donald Trump as the Republican nominee. While dispelling the myth that a headscarf makes you a walking target for terrorism, she shares both her own personal accounts and anecdotes from the “sisterhood” of writers that serve as her editorial team at MuslimGirl. Amani’s honest, urgent message is fresh, timely, and a deeply necessary counterpoint to the current rhetoric about the Middle East.

30 review for Muslim Girl: A Coming of Age Story

  1. 4 out of 5

    zaheerah

    * I received an uncorrected proof of this book from the publisher. This in no way affected my opinion of the book. "I hope she knows my pain is genuine, I thought. I hope she doesn't doubt that a Muslim American can be impacted by 9/11, too. The truth is that 9/11 never ended for us." Muslim Girl is Amani's memoir about growing up in a post-9/11 world and how her experiences in life, including moving back to her father's homeland of Jordan, helped shape her voice as a Muslim woman which later aide * I received an uncorrected proof of this book from the publisher. This in no way affected my opinion of the book. "I hope she knows my pain is genuine, I thought. I hope she doesn't doubt that a Muslim American can be impacted by 9/11, too. The truth is that 9/11 never ended for us." Muslim Girl is Amani's memoir about growing up in a post-9/11 world and how her experiences in life, including moving back to her father's homeland of Jordan, helped shape her voice as a Muslim woman which later aided her in the creation of MuslimGirl.com. Muslim Girl is a personal account of one of many voices. Amani's voice is so necessary, so honest and so damn important Simply put, I loved this. Amani's journey and story is an important one, one that many Muslims in Western countries could relate to. I know I did. One moment I really enjoyed was how she was introduced to self-realised interpretations of Islam. While I'm across the ocean, my experience mirrored hers so perfectly, just a couple of years down the line and on a new form of social media. I loved that Muslim Girl is about no longer depending on the attention of mainstream media. A Coming of Age shows Amani turning inwards and throwing herself into the centre. She created an indentity by seeing the sparse spot in our mainstream news which rarely focuses on us positively. We follow her story of how she creates her own platform so Muslim women can talk back. MuslimGirl.com is changing the way Islam is portrayed all over the world. Amani and this book is part of a new generation of Muslim women who are committed to combating stereotypical views. This book is merely a dip into the power and strength Amani has as she and the others alongside her are creating their own path as Muslim women living in today's modern society. It's been a year since I found MG.com and I love everything that Amani and the others alongside her have done to achieve to get where they all are now. Watch out for this October 18th

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Audiobook narrated by author, Amani Al-Khatahtbeh A beautifully crafted memoir about a young woman 's growing up in post 9-11 America, her Muslim identity, and the birth of her Muslim Girl organization. I have often felt in social circles that when topics such as, Islamophobia or anti-Semitism enter the conversation because of an event that is "in the news" that many of us fail to grasp how deep-rooted the impact on targeted people becomes. Argh! Not sure if I articulated that very well. For ex Audiobook narrated by author, Amani Al-Khatahtbeh A beautifully crafted memoir about a young woman 's growing up in post 9-11 America, her Muslim identity, and the birth of her Muslim Girl organization. I have often felt in social circles that when topics such as, Islamophobia or anti-Semitism enter the conversation because of an event that is "in the news" that many of us fail to grasp how deep-rooted the impact on targeted people becomes. Argh! Not sure if I articulated that very well. For example, Amani discusses how an innocent conversation between her friends and herself, in which the phrase "reset the button" was used, immediately raised fear in a nearby listener that because of Amani's attire, she must have been talking about a bomb. As a teacher, the parts that hurt my heart (and made me angry too) were the passages of bullying that Amani endured in school and how she felt she mustn't speak up because even the teachers were the bullies. But the greatest gift that Amani gives her readers is the ability to take a walk in her shoes and to look through the eyes of a Muslim girl as she watches the television and walks down the street. Hopefully this book will start a much needed dialogue.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    I didn't finish this book. The first chapter or two caught me, but I disliked the chronological lapses, and she comes across as very new. She's writing about things that happened in early 2016, and the book came out in October 2016. I would rather have read a few of her speeches, rather than read about how she got asked to give speeches. I thought the book lacked substance, which was disappointing, because I really wanted to know about what she has to say. But I guess the point is: go read her b I didn't finish this book. The first chapter or two caught me, but I disliked the chronological lapses, and she comes across as very new. She's writing about things that happened in early 2016, and the book came out in October 2016. I would rather have read a few of her speeches, rather than read about how she got asked to give speeches. I thought the book lacked substance, which was disappointing, because I really wanted to know about what she has to say. But I guess the point is: go read her blog.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Mooney (Shawn The Book Maniac)

    Despite having such strong feelings in support of the human rights of Muslims everywhere, and agreeing with basically all of her arguments here, I really disliked this book. It was extremely poorly written, in a tone that was both whiny and grandiose, and overflowing with horribly pedantic vocabulary. In my books, bad books are bad books, no matter how much I want to like them nor how much I agree with the politics of the writer. This one stank.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marta

    Amani Al-Khatahtbeh represents a unique and very important voice in our time - that of Muslim women. She founded MuslimGirl.com when she discovered that there was no place online for Muslim women to talk about their unique problems and interests. She discusses the fear of Muslims for their lives, the rampant Islamophobia, stereotypes, and the collective blaming of all 1.6 billion Muslims for the acts of a few. "Mass shootings are as American as apple pie", yet when Muslims commit them, they are Amani Al-Khatahtbeh represents a unique and very important voice in our time - that of Muslim women. She founded MuslimGirl.com when she discovered that there was no place online for Muslim women to talk about their unique problems and interests. She discusses the fear of Muslims for their lives, the rampant Islamophobia, stereotypes, and the collective blaming of all 1.6 billion Muslims for the acts of a few. "Mass shootings are as American as apple pie", yet when Muslims commit them, they are terrorists - everyone else is just a crazy individual. The first part of the book deals with her growing up in America and for nine months, in Jordan, the cultural influences that made her first doubt herself, then accept and assert her identity by wearing the hijab. She dispells the notion that the hijab is a tool of oppression, and makes it into a feminist statement. The second half of the book reads more like essays on Islamophobia and the fear of Trump's hateful America. Her points are incisive and important, especially in today's political climate. We all need to fight hate and stand up for minorities that are vulnerable. Muslim women are on the top of the list.

  6. 5 out of 5

    ElphaReads

    I have made it my goal to read books from more diverse backgrounds and experiences, especially in light of the election and the hate speech that has been committed by our President Elect towards a number of marginalized groups. In my effort to look for more diverse books, I found the book MUSLIM GIRL by Amani Al-Khatahtbeh, the creator of the blog site muslimgirl.com. I tossed it on my request list, and it arrived last week. I was actually taken by surprise by how thin this book was in my hand ( I have made it my goal to read books from more diverse backgrounds and experiences, especially in light of the election and the hate speech that has been committed by our President Elect towards a number of marginalized groups. In my effort to look for more diverse books, I found the book MUSLIM GIRL by Amani Al-Khatahtbeh, the creator of the blog site muslimgirl.com. I tossed it on my request list, and it arrived last week. I was actually taken by surprise by how thin this book was in my hand (134 pages), but the good news of that is that it was a fast read, completed basically in an evening with the last fifteen pages saved for the next morning. What I read was incredibly eye opening and important. Al-Khatahtbeh was a fourth grader in New Jersey when 9/11 happened. She remembers many things about that day, from the horror that spread through her school, to the mourning that was done at home by her family, to her father saying 'they are going to blame us'. And soon that became all too true. Al-Khatahtbeh had her first racial slur hurled at her at age 11, and felt the resentment, fear, and hatred of Islamaphobia all around her. After taking a family trip back to her father's home country of Jordan, Al-Khatahtbeh had a personal awakening, and started to wear the hijab when she returned home to the United States. Her activism from that point on was speaking up for Muslims, in particular Muslim women, and trying to deconstruct the dangerous stereotypes against her culture and religion that have persisted, and flared up again as Trump started his campaign for the presidency. I will say that this book was a bit short, but then Al-Khatahtbeh is really just starting her life of activism, so I was fine with that. Usually I feel frustrated when people who are in their twenties write their memoirs, but here she has so much to say and it's so important that I'm willing to give it a pass. From her own personal experiences to stories about the research she has done over the years, Al-Khatahtbeh tells a story about her life growing up in a post 9/11 world and what that meant for Muslims in this country, and what it still means today. There are many stories in here that infuriate me and made me very, very sad. Al-Khatahtbeh is a very tough lady who has had a lot of hateful stuff thrown her way over the years, and her speaking up for herself and others like her is an important read that really should be shared and taken to heart. And it has made me examine my own misconceptions and preconceptions about Muslim Women that I had and have, which is always very important as a white woman who has a lot of inherent privilege. I will be very interested to see where Al-Khatahtbeh goes in the next few years, and beyond. I hope that her voice continues to be heard. I will certainly be steering people towards this book to help make that happen.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Ciotta

    The author is highly intelligent, as is her prose. However, I really struggled with this book. I hoped it would be a fascinating insight into a young Muslim woman's life in a post 9/11 world, but instead, it was a long rant and I gave up around 40 pages in. The author is young, and because of her age, she hasn't worked through her emotions, and thus the angry rant comes forth. I am also an ethnic-looking woman, and was an ethnic-looking girl who grew up in the Christie Brinkley/Barbie-obsessed 1 The author is highly intelligent, as is her prose. However, I really struggled with this book. I hoped it would be a fascinating insight into a young Muslim woman's life in a post 9/11 world, but instead, it was a long rant and I gave up around 40 pages in. The author is young, and because of her age, she hasn't worked through her emotions, and thus the angry rant comes forth. I am also an ethnic-looking woman, and was an ethnic-looking girl who grew up in the Christie Brinkley/Barbie-obsessed 1980s, so it was hard for me too. I believe any ethnic woman has a similar story to tell in that regard. Yet I questioned the author's choices to make herself stand out more. Yes, she was a brave young girl, learning from her aunt, but I put down the book when she had decided to wear a head scarf to school on the first day of junior high. As an ethnic girl, what did she expect to happen? Being exotic looking is tough enough, especially in junior high, so unfortunately in our society, of course, she would get ostracized and teased. I felt the author's motivations were both attention seeking and doing things for shock value, just as a teenager would. I feel she is an excellent writer, intellectual and at times powerful with her word... but she has a lot of growing up to do before writing another memoir.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mark Ballinger

    I'm not 100% sure what this book was meant to be, but it was not impressive. The beginning is good. We hear about some time the author spent in Jordan, and issues of identity and connection to Islam come up. She returns to the states deciding to wear her hijab, and her thoughts about that are interesting. From there, though, this book is a slog. Too much prestige-dropping and very little that illuminates. There are good starts to ideas about feminism, tokenism, and lookism, but they don't go anyw I'm not 100% sure what this book was meant to be, but it was not impressive. The beginning is good. We hear about some time the author spent in Jordan, and issues of identity and connection to Islam come up. She returns to the states deciding to wear her hijab, and her thoughts about that are interesting. From there, though, this book is a slog. Too much prestige-dropping and very little that illuminates. There are good starts to ideas about feminism, tokenism, and lookism, but they don't go anywhere and don't have any impact. Chiefly, this is a problem of memoir written by the young. There's not enough experience to write about and a severe shortage of distance and reflection on experiences.

  9. 5 out of 5

    《Maram》

    As a Muslim Jordanian/Palestinian girl like Amani, I think Amani's story is very important and relatable to Muslim women who have experienced hate due to the events of 9/11. My experience was different from hers as I live in a Muslim country. I quite disagree with some of Amani's ideas because I do believe they do not represent many Muslim girls but I think what she has done a great deal to Muslim girls around the world by empowering them to fight in what they believe in. As a Muslim Jordanian/Palestinian girl like Amani, I think Amani's story is very important and relatable to Muslim women who have experienced hate due to the events of 9/11. My experience was different from hers as I live in a Muslim country. I quite disagree with some of Amani's ideas because I do believe they do not represent many Muslim girls but I think what she has done a great deal to Muslim girls around the world by empowering them to fight in what they believe in.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I received a free copy of Muslim Girl from the publisher through Goodreads -- thank you! So, this is one heck of a book to read in the context of Donald Trump being President elect, Brexit, the spike in hate crimes. In Muslim Girl, Amani Al-Khatahtbeh explores what it means to grow up as a Muslim American in a world impacted by 9/11, war, and some truly terrifying political shifts. She speaks candidly about her experiences of racism and anti-Muslim sentiment. The result is heartbreaking, infuriati I received a free copy of Muslim Girl from the publisher through Goodreads -- thank you! So, this is one heck of a book to read in the context of Donald Trump being President elect, Brexit, the spike in hate crimes. In Muslim Girl, Amani Al-Khatahtbeh explores what it means to grow up as a Muslim American in a world impacted by 9/11, war, and some truly terrifying political shifts. She speaks candidly about her experiences of racism and anti-Muslim sentiment. The result is heartbreaking, infuriating, and eye-opening. This is also a memoir of empowerment, of the author's experiences in finding and seizing her own voice, of survival. And it is a thoughtful and compelling exploration of race and gender. And all the way through, she points out hypocrisy in North American culture -- the way we assume that the hijab is oppressive instead of affirming Muslim women's bodily autonomy, the way we focus on race and religion when a Muslim person commits a shooting (see: Orlando) but it never becomes an issue when a white Christian opens fire. And... I'm going to stop talking now, because frankly, you shouldn't spend any more time listening to me. This is a fantastic book. This is an incredibly relevant and timely book. Go read it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anne Ross

    I really wanted to like and learn from this book, but it just didn't grab me. The story didn't engage me and the author could have benefited from some distance from her story before writing it down. I was not interested in following the narrator and just couldn't finish it. I really wanted to like and learn from this book, but it just didn't grab me. The story didn't engage me and the author could have benefited from some distance from her story before writing it down. I was not interested in following the narrator and just couldn't finish it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kailyn Kausen

    4.5/5 stars. Review to come

  13. 5 out of 5

    Pollopicu

    I picked this book because I love reading about Muslim culture, especially during the climate of 9/11. I was in my late 20's early 30's when the towers were hit living in Brooklyn with a far away view of the smoke coming off the towers, and was one of the parents anxiously waiting for my son to come out of the gates of school so i could get him home safe. And I've always been horrified by how badly Muslims were treated in the aftermath. Many times being a woman of color myself, I had to stand up I picked this book because I love reading about Muslim culture, especially during the climate of 9/11. I was in my late 20's early 30's when the towers were hit living in Brooklyn with a far away view of the smoke coming off the towers, and was one of the parents anxiously waiting for my son to come out of the gates of school so i could get him home safe. And I've always been horrified by how badly Muslims were treated in the aftermath. Many times being a woman of color myself, I had to stand up for them, and and take the stand again my some friends and even family members. Before 9/11 I always had positive experiences with the Muslim culture, and actually admired it. So I really never understood where all that seething hatred came from. Witnessing the racism of it all, aside from all the other racism that already exists in nyc set my ideas on who I wanted to be, and who I am today. With that said... I think amani is an annoying little narcissist. Just another "feminist" millennial. They really annoy the shit out of me, these little hipsters. I enjoyed some of her poignant stories about growing up in the 9/11 culture, but then she kind of went into this humble brag about her successful blog, and talking about her light skin.. and exotic eyebrows, and fake contacts. Like you're Muslim, who the fuck cares? and I'm sorry, I can't take a Muslim publication seriously when you allow yourself to be interviewed by the magazine that is known throughout history to oppress and exploit, and promote violence against women (playboy), and to also defend the porn star who wore the Hijab in sex videos? she explained it away as if this actress was doing it for political reasons, as satire, but the fact is that she went all the way and was still having sex with these men, it's real, and so either way she's disrespecting the hijab, and the Muslim religion. If you don't want to be muslim anymore, don't be muslim, but don't try to change a religion simply because you don't like the rules anymore. Part of being muslim is about humility and modesty. I see her lacking in both. It's these fucking millenials.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Assia

    Okey. I'm a Muslim girl too, and I couldn't help but read this book as a muslim girl, meaning it was hard for me to stay objective. Some might say she isn't saying anything new to the world, and at some point I agree but I also think that someone needed to put words on these thoughts, to make them public, which she did. And let's hope that someone will open this book out of curiosity and read it to end up thinking differently, seeing things in a different light or at least just try to question t Okey. I'm a Muslim girl too, and I couldn't help but read this book as a muslim girl, meaning it was hard for me to stay objective. Some might say she isn't saying anything new to the world, and at some point I agree but I also think that someone needed to put words on these thoughts, to make them public, which she did. And let's hope that someone will open this book out of curiosity and read it to end up thinking differently, seeing things in a different light or at least just try to question themselves. As a muslim girl, a French Muslim girl, I couldn't help but identify, even if I'm not American, because what happened and happens in America reaches us, it reached to the world. When she described specific moments (bad moments) that happened to her I couldn't help but remember something specific that had happened to me, and how I reacted exactly like her. There are so many things to say about this book, there were so many passages I wanted to highlight (I couldn't though because I borrowed it from a friend of mine). This is the book that I would buy for everyone to read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Looking at the history of America from the huge turning point of 9/11 onward, but from the very important and often overlooked perspective of a Muslim American girl coming of age as the towers fell, as Islamaphobia ran rampant, through her parents briefly leaving the country because America began to feel unsafe and coming back home shortly after, the Arab Spring, and the rise of Trump. Short read, but very powerful! Definitely worth reading.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Samihah

    3.5 stars ~ thought this was a p interesting read. the author, amani al-khatahtbah makes multiple references throughout the book to chimamanda ngozi adichie's idea of the danger of only sharing a single story. with that message in mind, here's a link to an article about how amani underpaid and exploited free labor from many Muslim women who worked for her platform, Muslim Girl. 3.5 stars ~ thought this was a p interesting read. the author, amani al-khatahtbah makes multiple references throughout the book to chimamanda ngozi adichie's idea of the danger of only sharing a single story. with that message in mind, here's a link to an article about how amani underpaid and exploited free labor from many Muslim women who worked for her platform, Muslim Girl.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Crain

    3.5 - 4 stars As is the case with any stereotype, society allows one person's shortcomings or poor choices suddenly to blanket represent everyone else who looks, acts, thinks, worships, believes the same. But that is simply unrealistic and unacceptable. There are bad bad people in the world that come from every kind of religious, political, and socioeconomic background. They are white, black, brown, and all shades in between. Violence and evil does not come wrapped up only inside one specific col 3.5 - 4 stars As is the case with any stereotype, society allows one person's shortcomings or poor choices suddenly to blanket represent everyone else who looks, acts, thinks, worships, believes the same. But that is simply unrealistic and unacceptable. There are bad bad people in the world that come from every kind of religious, political, and socioeconomic background. They are white, black, brown, and all shades in between. Violence and evil does not come wrapped up only inside one specific color, culture, or even gender. It sadly prevails across the board. So, assuming and therefore treating a person or a people group as though they are bad, evil, or less than by default is not only ignorant but it's also self defaming. Racial, religious, and political tensions are nothing new. Unfortunately after 9/11 this kind of hate filled victimization of people or groups who identify with Islam or being Muslim took a front seat in society. Whether or not they identify with the terrorists themselves, people suddenly want to look down upon and be afraid of those who might look like those people based on where they come from, how they dress, and what religious practices they have. It was a deeper look into this disheartening situation that I was hoping to get when I requested Muslim Girl for review. In reading, I did gain insight into the plight of Muslims in America and around the world today. And it broke my heart to see how someone experienced firsthand the cruelty of ignorance and fear. However, in many ways I felt the author's stance on feeling not good enough, her self doubt, and her fear were in no way specific to being a Muslim girl in a post 9/11 world so much as they were feelings of being human- gender, race, and background aside. I don't doubt there were plenty of times and situations that extended beyond those common feelings, but in a number if of the situations she wrote about I felt too much emphasis was put on the female Muslim struggle as opposed to just a kid growing up. One such point was where she talked about feeling insecure with voicing her opinions to classmates about a school project. In another she didn't speak up when people cut ahead of her in line. In both scenarios she suggested she silently bit her tongue because internally she felt that due to her being Muslim she wasn't good enough or on the same level as those other people. I grew up in an average income white, Christian, Republican home and still felt the same in school- even today at times. If I wanted to do some thing but felt the other students believed they were better than me and wouldn't like my speaking up, I sat back quietly albeit disappointed in myself. It had nothing to do with where I came from; it was just a common lack of confidence and unwillingness to put myself in the spotlight. So, no, I don't think it's fair to blame racial tensions and discrimination for every situation. That being said, I do fully respect and understand that the lives Muslim women and men live today are often times more difficult because of discrimination. For that I, on behalf of all the people of the world who don't see you as any different than anyone else, apologize. It's unfair to feel your existence threatened because of your skin color, clothing choice, and religion. And I'm sorry that you've been hurt. I'd like to thank the author, publisher, and NetGalley for granting me this review opportunity. Here's to a future with brighter tomorrows for all of us.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hafsa

    This is the most powerful memoir I have ever read in my life. Immediately after I finished reading it, I opened it and began rereading; I've never done that with any other book, but this one deserved it. Amani tells the story of navigating a Muslim-American identity in a place where the masses overwhelmingly consider those identities to be mutually exclusive, especially when labels like "feminist," "entrepreneur," and "activist" are thrown in the mix. Being the child of immigrants, Amani is force This is the most powerful memoir I have ever read in my life. Immediately after I finished reading it, I opened it and began rereading; I've never done that with any other book, but this one deserved it. Amani tells the story of navigating a Muslim-American identity in a place where the masses overwhelmingly consider those identities to be mutually exclusive, especially when labels like "feminist," "entrepreneur," and "activist" are thrown in the mix. Being the child of immigrants, Amani is forced to renegotiate the space she lives in within our society and reclaim it as her own. She writes how she struggled to understand her own self worth, how she faced anger and hatred headon, how she is spreading to the larger world a message of interconnectedness and understanding that transcends labels. Amani's story is a deeply powerful microcosm of the struggles American Muslims face in a post-9/11, and now pre-Trump, world, humanized by her lyrical and witty writing. To me, this book is an exemplar of the power of representation. Seeing pieces of my own story reflected in someone else's, really for the first time in my life, was awe-some, to say the least. It's the difference between knowing at a cognitive level I'm not crazy and being able to KNOW deep inside that I'm not the only one, that I am valid, and that we can overcome.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jen, Jenny, Jennifer

    I'm nervous, I don't think I can do this book & author justice. Amani offers us her first-hand account of growing up Muslim in a post 9/11 America. Considering how she lays out the changes in rhetoric from pre 9/11 to today, our America is in a freefall of ugly fear-mongering by White Nationalism, the ignorance surrounding white privledge & a media bent on raising our terror levels. Read "Muslim Girl" to see how much words matter, how much we are desensitized to hate crime & hypersensitized to t I'm nervous, I don't think I can do this book & author justice. Amani offers us her first-hand account of growing up Muslim in a post 9/11 America. Considering how she lays out the changes in rhetoric from pre 9/11 to today, our America is in a freefall of ugly fear-mongering by White Nationalism, the ignorance surrounding white privledge & a media bent on raising our terror levels. Read "Muslim Girl" to see how much words matter, how much we are desensitized to hate crime & hypersensitized to the mere notion that white privledge is made up. It's not! Amani backs up every panic attack she's experienced with real episodes of bullying, racism, ignorance & hate because she's Muslim & chooses to wear the hijab. But it's Amani's perseverance & deep courage that has kept her standing in resistance to the hate that I most admire. She is truly unflinching. Having recently read a couple of Elif Shafak books, I'm learning more about the Muslim religion & now having read #muslimgirl I now know what my dear friend was talking about. I indeed feel #woke & am so proud of my fellow citizens who are standing against the travel & immigration bans. I'm hopeful that with Amani & so many others, our country will find its compass. #amanialkhatahtbeh #goodreadschallenge2017 #bookaddict #bookstagram #booklover #muslim #elifshakaf #badass

  20. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    I came close to giving up on this book--a rarity for me. Anyone who has been conscious since 9/11, is painfully aware of the outrageous backlash directed at all Muslims, as well as ignorant defaming of the Islam religion. So I do not discount that the author's childhood and adolescence were affected, and I do admire her courage in wearing a hijab on the NY subway as an adult, knowing it will attract negative attention, if not violence. But until the final two chapters, the tone was whiney and bo I came close to giving up on this book--a rarity for me. Anyone who has been conscious since 9/11, is painfully aware of the outrageous backlash directed at all Muslims, as well as ignorant defaming of the Islam religion. So I do not discount that the author's childhood and adolescence were affected, and I do admire her courage in wearing a hijab on the NY subway as an adult, knowing it will attract negative attention, if not violence. But until the final two chapters, the tone was whiney and boring. Many of the experiences she attributes to racism and Islamophobia are experienced by any 'out' group of children and adolescents. Her adult voice becomes confident and admirable. As her website takes off, and speaking engagements become frequent and high profile, she is aware that she may be the token Muslim woman on a panel, but she is clear that they are her golden opportunity to get her message out. She reminds us that there are 1.6 billion Muslims in the world, and to portray all Muslim women as victims is like portraying the KKK as representative of all white Americans. So for those who need reminding, this is a useful book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Wonderish

    Must read, especially during this Trump era. The author is insightful, passionate and a powerhouse. She shares some of her childhood memories experiences and emotions and then talks about her career as a journalist and an activist. The book is not perfect. There is a wealth of information and important social commentary that is not well organized and it needs a good rinse through the edit cycle. But Al-Khatahtbeh is an intelligent, impassioned writer who is saying things that need to be said, an Must read, especially during this Trump era. The author is insightful, passionate and a powerhouse. She shares some of her childhood memories experiences and emotions and then talks about her career as a journalist and an activist. The book is not perfect. There is a wealth of information and important social commentary that is not well organized and it needs a good rinse through the edit cycle. But Al-Khatahtbeh is an intelligent, impassioned writer who is saying things that need to be said, and heard, in out current political climate. All that being said, I also just enjoyed hearing what life looks like for this particular person, as it's so different from my own experiences and from what I've read before. What's reading for, if not to get to see through the eyes of someone other than yourself?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Miss Susan

    tfw u read a memoir and immediately start looking for your phone cause you gotta call your parents to thank them for picking canada to immigrate to rather then america like i'm not about to pretend canada didn't/doesn't have it's own fun flirtations with islamophobia but i didn't experience the kind of pervasive discrimination amani talks about also i took a couple weeks to finish this because a few chapters in i was like, hmm, i wanna check out muslimgirl.com, came across an article linking to bl tfw u read a memoir and immediately start looking for your phone cause you gotta call your parents to thank them for picking canada to immigrate to rather then america like i'm not about to pretend canada didn't/doesn't have it's own fun flirtations with islamophobia but i didn't experience the kind of pervasive discrimination amani talks about also i took a couple weeks to finish this because a few chapters in i was like, hmm, i wanna check out muslimgirl.com, came across an article linking to blogs of islamic feminists and have only recently come up for air. ty for that experience, amani, it was amazing, suddenly all i want to do in life is read about feminist quranic exegesis 4 stars

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Kenneweg

    Hated it! Title says it all. Muslim GIRL. Listened to audio book and felt like I was being yelled at by a know it all high school / college girl the entire time so it was painful. Topic was interesting but could be covered in a chapter max. I have read other books by other Muslim women that were much better. Will not read this author again.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Barb

    it took a little while to read Muslim Girl, mainly because it made me think , wasn't a book i could fly through. . Brought up alot of emotions with all the hate! You can't blame a whole religion on the basis of some group of people making horrible decisions. Really this woman just want the Muslim females to be heard and respected. The same thing all of us really want isnt it! it took a little while to read Muslim Girl, mainly because it made me think , wasn't a book i could fly through. . Brought up alot of emotions with all the hate! You can't blame a whole religion on the basis of some group of people making horrible decisions. Really this woman just want the Muslim females to be heard and respected. The same thing all of us really want isnt it!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sphinx Feathers

    I enjoyed reading this as it was a point of view that I hadn't given a lot of thought to and one that needs a voice, especially these days. Part political commentary, part memoir, and part "humanizer" for a group that has been dehumanized. PopSugar 2017: Interesting woman I enjoyed reading this as it was a point of view that I hadn't given a lot of thought to and one that needs a voice, especially these days. Part political commentary, part memoir, and part "humanizer" for a group that has been dehumanized. PopSugar 2017: Interesting woman

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hawraa

    I rarely ever rate five stars, but this truly is a must read. Incredibly insightful, succinct, and honest. I've quickly become an admirer of Amani Al Khatahtbeh, and it's hard not to be when you see all that she's accomplished and learned in her young life so far. She is definitely one to watch. I rarely ever rate five stars, but this truly is a must read. Incredibly insightful, succinct, and honest. I've quickly become an admirer of Amani Al Khatahtbeh, and it's hard not to be when you see all that she's accomplished and learned in her young life so far. She is definitely one to watch.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Very timely, very relevant. I would compare it to the Te-Nehisi Coates book from last year; you may not agree with everything you read but once you see our society from Amani's perspective, you can't unsee it. Another book that will wake you up. I'd add another half star if that matters. Very timely, very relevant. I would compare it to the Te-Nehisi Coates book from last year; you may not agree with everything you read but once you see our society from Amani's perspective, you can't unsee it. Another book that will wake you up. I'd add another half star if that matters.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed

    You can't write a book before reading 120 books ... You can't write a book before reading 120 books ...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katharina

    Fascinating and wonderful and important. Required reading, especially at the moment.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Janine

    3.75/5

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