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The New York City Draft Riots of 1863: The History of the Notorious Insurrection at the Height of the Civil War

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*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the riots from New York residents and authorities *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "Martial law ought to be proclaimed, but I have not a sufficient force to enforce it.” – Major General John E. Wool, commander of the Department of the East Most adults alive today either remem *Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the riots from New York residents and authorities *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "Martial law ought to be proclaimed, but I have not a sufficient force to enforce it.” – Major General John E. Wool, commander of the Department of the East Most adults alive today either remember or have heard of the turbulent 1960s, but far fewer are familiar with the similarities those more recent protests had with the earlier unrest of a century earlier. Although the Civil War is remembered as the seminal event of American history, and it is often portrayed as the Lincoln administration and the North fighting bravely to preserve the Union and ultimately end slavery, the truth at the time was far more complicated. Perhaps most notably, as with Vietnam, the Civil War was very unpopular among many in the North, especially in large, manufacturing cities that were dependent on the South for raw materials. Also, as African Americans made their way north in the hopes of making new lives for themselves, they often encountered racism and outright violence. Native born Americans and newly arrived immigrants alike often resented black men taking jobs they felt were theirs by right, and in the wake of the Emancipation Proclamation, many men were hesitant to fight on behalf of a cause that they saw as being for the benefit of blacks. With the Civil War still raging and no end in sight, the Lincoln administration instituted the first conscription laws in the North in 1863, and it led quickly to an outbreak of violence in New York City and other large cities. In fact, the New York City draft riots, which lasted several days in July of that year, still stand today as the bloodiest and deadliest in American history. More than 100 people died during the week of July 12-18 as mobs of thousands looted and burned buildings across the city in protest. However, in addition to targeting the draft, people also attacked African American men, women and children and anyone who might try to defend them. It’s been estimated that over a dozen blacks were lynched across the city during the unrest, and thousands of people were injured. Ultimately, the city’s police department was forced to call in forces from all around, including a number of battle weary soldiers who had just fought a few weeks earlier at Gettysburg, to put down what seemed to be moving toward a new insurrection. In the end, the authorities were able to stop the violence, but the heavy price paid by the city’s newest black citizens would tarnish race relations in that area for another century. The New York City Draft Riots of 1863: The History of the Notorious Insurrection at the Height of the Civil War chronicles the controversial violence that wreaked havoc across New York City in the summer of 1863. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about the New York City draft riots like never before.


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*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the riots from New York residents and authorities *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "Martial law ought to be proclaimed, but I have not a sufficient force to enforce it.” – Major General John E. Wool, commander of the Department of the East Most adults alive today either remem *Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the riots from New York residents and authorities *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "Martial law ought to be proclaimed, but I have not a sufficient force to enforce it.” – Major General John E. Wool, commander of the Department of the East Most adults alive today either remember or have heard of the turbulent 1960s, but far fewer are familiar with the similarities those more recent protests had with the earlier unrest of a century earlier. Although the Civil War is remembered as the seminal event of American history, and it is often portrayed as the Lincoln administration and the North fighting bravely to preserve the Union and ultimately end slavery, the truth at the time was far more complicated. Perhaps most notably, as with Vietnam, the Civil War was very unpopular among many in the North, especially in large, manufacturing cities that were dependent on the South for raw materials. Also, as African Americans made their way north in the hopes of making new lives for themselves, they often encountered racism and outright violence. Native born Americans and newly arrived immigrants alike often resented black men taking jobs they felt were theirs by right, and in the wake of the Emancipation Proclamation, many men were hesitant to fight on behalf of a cause that they saw as being for the benefit of blacks. With the Civil War still raging and no end in sight, the Lincoln administration instituted the first conscription laws in the North in 1863, and it led quickly to an outbreak of violence in New York City and other large cities. In fact, the New York City draft riots, which lasted several days in July of that year, still stand today as the bloodiest and deadliest in American history. More than 100 people died during the week of July 12-18 as mobs of thousands looted and burned buildings across the city in protest. However, in addition to targeting the draft, people also attacked African American men, women and children and anyone who might try to defend them. It’s been estimated that over a dozen blacks were lynched across the city during the unrest, and thousands of people were injured. Ultimately, the city’s police department was forced to call in forces from all around, including a number of battle weary soldiers who had just fought a few weeks earlier at Gettysburg, to put down what seemed to be moving toward a new insurrection. In the end, the authorities were able to stop the violence, but the heavy price paid by the city’s newest black citizens would tarnish race relations in that area for another century. The New York City Draft Riots of 1863: The History of the Notorious Insurrection at the Height of the Civil War chronicles the controversial violence that wreaked havoc across New York City in the summer of 1863. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about the New York City draft riots like never before.

33 review for The New York City Draft Riots of 1863: The History of the Notorious Insurrection at the Height of the Civil War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Terri Gostola

    Some of the depictions of violence is graphic. I felt sick to my stomach over the senseless hatred and racism that was raging out of control during the 1863 draft riots in New York City. The story of what happened to the orphanage was particularly distressing. I am shocked that I never knew about these riots before and all I can do is shake my head at the my lack of education from my public school upbringing. I studied the history of the Civil War in college and still somehow my learning about t Some of the depictions of violence is graphic. I felt sick to my stomach over the senseless hatred and racism that was raging out of control during the 1863 draft riots in New York City. The story of what happened to the orphanage was particularly distressing. I am shocked that I never knew about these riots before and all I can do is shake my head at the my lack of education from my public school upbringing. I studied the history of the Civil War in college and still somehow my learning about these horrific riots fell through the gaps. In the end after reading this book all I could do was shake my head and be sad. I learned a lot.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Leo Koester

  3. 4 out of 5

    g

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bob Bowden

  5. 5 out of 5

    allan k elliott

  6. 5 out of 5

    Charles W Bradley

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mr. S. Lewis

  8. 5 out of 5

    Terry

  9. 4 out of 5

    Martha Kent

  10. 4 out of 5

    laurie chavasse

  11. 4 out of 5

    Monty2 Monteith

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

  13. 5 out of 5

    tm

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brett

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mr. Peter J. Finn, Jr.

  16. 5 out of 5

    david godzis

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul J

  18. 5 out of 5

    zoilo suarez

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda Dungan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kusaimamekirai

  21. 5 out of 5

    Richard Brylczyk

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bill derivan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Barber

  24. 4 out of 5

    Allen Patterson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Denise

  26. 4 out of 5

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Huei-Chen Lin

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  31. 5 out of 5

    Donald G. Neuner

  32. 5 out of 5

    Joseph C. Harris

  33. 5 out of 5

    mike johnson

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