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The Spectrum of Hope: An Optimistic and New Approach to Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias

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Imagine finding a glimmer of good news in a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. And imagine how that would change the outlook of the 5 million Americans who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, not to mention their families, loved ones, and caretakers. A neurologist who’s been specializing in dementia and memory loss for more than 20 years, Dr. Gayatri Devi rewrites Imagine finding a glimmer of good news in a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. And imagine how that would change the outlook of the 5 million Americans who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, not to mention their families, loved ones, and caretakers. A neurologist who’s been specializing in dementia and memory loss for more than 20 years, Dr. Gayatri Devi rewrites the story of Alzheimer’s by defining it as a spectrum disorder—like autism, Alzheimer’s is a disease that affects different people differently. She encourages people who are worried about memory impairment to seek a diagnosis, because early treatment will enable doctors and caregivers to manage the disease more effectively through drugs and other therapies. Told through the stories of Dr. Devi’s patients, The Spectrum of Hope is the kind of narrative medical writing that grips the reader, humanizes the science, and offers equal parts practical advice and wisdom with skillful ease. But beyond the pleasures of great reading, it’s a book that offers real hope. Here are chapters on how to maintain independence and dignity; how to fight depression, anxiety, and apathy; how to communicate effectively with a person suffering from dementia. Plus chapters on sexuality, genetics, going public with the diagnosis, even putting together a bucket list—because through her practice, Dr. Devi knows that the majority of Alzheimer’s patients continue to live and work in their communities. They babysit their grandkids, drive to the store (or own the store), serve their clients, or otherwise live fulfilling lives. That’s news that 5 million people are waiting to hear.  


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Imagine finding a glimmer of good news in a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. And imagine how that would change the outlook of the 5 million Americans who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, not to mention their families, loved ones, and caretakers. A neurologist who’s been specializing in dementia and memory loss for more than 20 years, Dr. Gayatri Devi rewrites Imagine finding a glimmer of good news in a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. And imagine how that would change the outlook of the 5 million Americans who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, not to mention their families, loved ones, and caretakers. A neurologist who’s been specializing in dementia and memory loss for more than 20 years, Dr. Gayatri Devi rewrites the story of Alzheimer’s by defining it as a spectrum disorder—like autism, Alzheimer’s is a disease that affects different people differently. She encourages people who are worried about memory impairment to seek a diagnosis, because early treatment will enable doctors and caregivers to manage the disease more effectively through drugs and other therapies. Told through the stories of Dr. Devi’s patients, The Spectrum of Hope is the kind of narrative medical writing that grips the reader, humanizes the science, and offers equal parts practical advice and wisdom with skillful ease. But beyond the pleasures of great reading, it’s a book that offers real hope. Here are chapters on how to maintain independence and dignity; how to fight depression, anxiety, and apathy; how to communicate effectively with a person suffering from dementia. Plus chapters on sexuality, genetics, going public with the diagnosis, even putting together a bucket list—because through her practice, Dr. Devi knows that the majority of Alzheimer’s patients continue to live and work in their communities. They babysit their grandkids, drive to the store (or own the store), serve their clients, or otherwise live fulfilling lives. That’s news that 5 million people are waiting to hear.  

30 review for The Spectrum of Hope: An Optimistic and New Approach to Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias

  1. 4 out of 5

    ij

    A Spectrum of Hope is a very insightful book about the treatment and new approaches to dealing with alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. The author Gayatri Devi, MD is a neurologist and these diseases are a major part of her specialty. Devi provides important information for patients and caregivers. In the book she uses stories about her patients to help paint a picture of how she deals with her patients and caregivers. I learned that there are many types of memory diseases and what types of A Spectrum of Hope is a very insightful book about the treatment and new approaches to dealing with alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. The author Gayatri Devi, MD is a neurologist and these diseases are a major part of her specialty. Devi provides important information for patients and caregivers. In the book she uses stories about her patients to help paint a picture of how she deals with her patients and caregivers. I learned that there are many types of memory diseases and what types of tests are necessary to reach the right diagnosis. Many patients can continue to take care of themselves, to work, and to socialize, with little or no problem. Some need either part-time or full-time care. Devi in most cases recommends that her patients remain in their homes. This helps cut down on patients being confused about their whereabouts. My paternal grandfather and my father both had alzheimer’s disease. A lot has changed since their deaths. There is better testing and medications. One thing that I learned is that I am not necessarily prone to their disease, by heredity. I recommend this book to anyone interested in gaining more knowledge of these diseases. I also recommend for anyone who is a relative or caregiver of a person with any of these diseases

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    When I saw the title of this book, I was immediately drawn to it. I felt the need to find what this doctor has learned, what there is that is cause for optimism in her approach to Alzheimer's and other dementias. What I've learned does give me hope and a measure of optimism. Within the Alzheimer's classifications of rapid vs slowly progressive, Dr. Devi has broken down the disease into further levels, and evaluates major cognitive areas and current level of function. Using multiple case studies, When I saw the title of this book, I was immediately drawn to it. I felt the need to find what this doctor has learned, what there is that is cause for optimism in her approach to Alzheimer's and other dementias. What I've learned does give me hope and a measure of optimism. Within the Alzheimer's classifications of rapid vs slowly progressive, Dr. Devi has broken down the disease into further levels, and evaluates major cognitive areas and current level of function. Using multiple case studies, she makes the case for various forms of intervention and how they can markedly affect the speed of progression of the disease. As a former Occupational Therapist who worked in home care for many years, I wish I'd had this resource for patients and families. Of course, most of the people I saw were further along the spectrum by the time I met them, but there is valuable information for those families here too. The book provides information on the diagnostic process, the various aspects of the treatment process recommended by Dr. Devi along with results seen in case studies (and some of patients who opted not to participate). There is also a nice section on the difference between memory and intelligence, very useful for anyone who has had a patient or family member say "How did I get so stupid?" There is a chapter on the genetics of Alzheimer's and also the use of diet, physical activity and social engagement as means of prevention. Other chapters deal with such common problems as fear of bathing, depression, apathy. Also--when is it time to hire private help. And each of these are shown through multiple case studies, each from a slightly different perspective. And there is much more. One of the major public mis-perceptions is that ALL of Alzheimer's IS the most severe cases. In truth, there are very likely many undiagnosed people functioning well in society around you every day, working, driving, socialising without any perceptible problem. Their symptoms are so sub-clinical that they and their significant others don't notice them. Many of Dr. Devi's patients continue to work, with some adaptation, for years, some in very high level positions. Of course, as the doctor emphasizes, no two people are alike and no two cases of Alzheimer's are alike. I hope that, should I develop the tell-tale symptoms of Alzheimer's, I am fortunate enough to find a physician as intelligent, as humane, and as caring as Dr. Devi who obviously has acted with her whole and best self as much as possible on behalf of her patients and their families. I recommend this as a resource for libraries, for individuals in health care and for those with interest in this area, be they patients or family members. A copy of this book was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    I've started reading two or three other books about Alzheimer's, but didn't get very far. This book is an absolute GEM. It weaves information, reflections, stories, advice and encouragement. Beautifully written! Thinking about writing to the author, not my usual practice. Definitely on my ten best ever books list. Bought it before finishing reading the library copy. P.S.: This book is not just about Alzheimer's. It would be of benefit to ANYONE who is alive. I've started reading two or three other books about Alzheimer's, but didn't get very far. This book is an absolute GEM. It weaves information, reflections, stories, advice and encouragement. Beautifully written! Thinking about writing to the author, not my usual practice. Definitely on my ten best ever books list. Bought it before finishing reading the library copy. P.S.: This book is not just about Alzheimer's. It would be of benefit to ANYONE who is alive.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Esther

    ARC provided by NetGalley and Publisher in exchange for an honest review. Sadly I found this to be uninformative and dry. The information is repeat of what's been published. Information that is found in pamphlets handed out by doctors and nurses. My expectations might have been too high or what I thought would be informative with solutions and options for help didn't evolve, sadly. I do a lot of reading and researching for new information as my Mother has alzheimer's and had hopes for some new and ARC provided by NetGalley and Publisher in exchange for an honest review. Sadly I found this to be uninformative and dry. The information is repeat of what's been published. Information that is found in pamphlets handed out by doctors and nurses. My expectations might have been too high or what I thought would be informative with solutions and options for help didn't evolve, sadly. I do a lot of reading and researching for new information as my Mother has alzheimer's and had hopes for some new and enlightening solutions and answers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    WSJ Excerpt-essay (may be paywalled): https://www.wsj.com/articles/living-w... "Seven years ago, Joe, a 73-year-old man with a patrician bearing, came to see me at my Manhattan office with his stylish wife and their grown daughter. (I’ve changed his name to protect his privacy.) A money manager in charge of more than a billion dollars in assets, Joe could tell that his memory was fading. Transactions that were once easy for him had started to cause him trouble. ...Many people have the idea that Al WSJ Excerpt-essay (may be paywalled): https://www.wsj.com/articles/living-w... "Seven years ago, Joe, a 73-year-old man with a patrician bearing, came to see me at my Manhattan office with his stylish wife and their grown daughter. (I’ve changed his name to protect his privacy.) A money manager in charge of more than a billion dollars in assets, Joe could tell that his memory was fading. Transactions that were once easy for him had started to cause him trouble. ...Many people have the idea that Alzheimer’s is a one-way street to inexorable decline. They believe that treatment is ineffective, which often discourages them from seeking a diagnosis when facing memory loss. But the reality of the disease is very different. Having worked as a neurologist for over 20 years, I see Alzheimer’s not as a single disease but as a spectrum disorder—with a wide range of symptoms, responses to treatment and prognoses. Early diagnosis and treatment has kept many of my patients stable. ... Joe is 80 now. I recently got a call from an outraged cardiologist whom Joe had seen for a problem unrelated to his Alzheimer’s. “What do you mean Joe has Alzheimer’s?” he asked. “He is functioning perfectly! There’s nothing wrong with him. You should redo his tests. I do not believe this man has Alzheimer’s.” ... Not very long ago, Joe and I had a heated discussion about the stock market—and I am delighted to report that, despite my best efforts, I lost the argument. " —Dr. Devi is director of Park Avenue Neurology in New York. This essay is adapted from her new book. If you need a full copy of her essay, message me with your email. Essential reading for anyone facing this disease, in themself or a loved one.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    A Very Important Book!!! So wish I had read this a year ago, I could have had some info in hand to be more aggressive in getting my Dad in for evaluation & treatment. Easy to read, do not need any kind of medical background to understand. Highly recommend for anyone concerned for themselves or others about developing dementia or have seen concerning behavioral changes. There are a lot of highly functional people living with dementia. Its important to address cognitive and brain reserve and maxim A Very Important Book!!! So wish I had read this a year ago, I could have had some info in hand to be more aggressive in getting my Dad in for evaluation & treatment. Easy to read, do not need any kind of medical background to understand. Highly recommend for anyone concerned for themselves or others about developing dementia or have seen concerning behavioral changes. There are a lot of highly functional people living with dementia. Its important to address cognitive and brain reserve and maximize a strong immune system. Dr. Devi with 2 decades of experience, uses cases to highlight different aspects of her evaluation protocol and various treatments: medication, behavioral therapies, cognitive exercise and transcranial magnetic stimulation. She identifies whether someone has She also discusses that there are a few other diseases that if not ruled in or out, can lead to a misdiagnosis of dementia. I was particularly struck with how she teases out whether someone is having memory issues, changes in language or life skills and how that is important to tailor individualized treatment plans. She advocates staying in the home if possible, discusses caregivers hospitalizations, and living & dying with dignity.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joy Wright

    As I support my grandmother with dementia, this book was extremely helpful understanding the disease, effective treatment, and the caregiver’s role. Dr. Devi’s book was a well written explanation of Alzheimers on a spectrum with patient experiences.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Leyla Johnson

    I was very interested to read this book having had both my parents die from the result of Alzheimer’s, my mother from early onset, my father had Lewy body type. The disease has intrigued me due to both going this way - and wonder if it was hereditary, environmental or medical factor had something to do with it. This book really did give me hope for the future of Alzheimer patients, my mother tragically spent many many years in a chair not speaking, occasionally you would see tear slipping down he I was very interested to read this book having had both my parents die from the result of Alzheimer’s, my mother from early onset, my father had Lewy body type. The disease has intrigued me due to both going this way - and wonder if it was hereditary, environmental or medical factor had something to do with it. This book really did give me hope for the future of Alzheimer patients, my mother tragically spent many many years in a chair not speaking, occasionally you would see tear slipping down her cheek. and her eyes would sparkle and we knew she understood, but no-one had any idea how to treat the people with this distressing disease. If only we knew, if only other knew she would have had some dignity in her last years. Anyone with a relative or friend with Alzheimer’s should read this book, anyone who fear it should also read this book, and find some hope within it. Everyone should read this and understand that the people with Alzheimer’s can live fruitful lives not be stuck in a chair and hidden away.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    A welcome and much-needed alternative to the dire picture of the one-size-fits-all Alzheimer's that exists in the popular media, this book offers an alternative: a spectrum with room for lifestyle changes + medicine that offsets rate of change. The message is wholly inspiring. There is no question about it. Especially when the author, a noted neurologist, takes the time to explain the facts, genetics doesn't turn out to explain much, even though somehow everyone assumes they do. Once the reader A welcome and much-needed alternative to the dire picture of the one-size-fits-all Alzheimer's that exists in the popular media, this book offers an alternative: a spectrum with room for lifestyle changes + medicine that offsets rate of change. The message is wholly inspiring. There is no question about it. Especially when the author, a noted neurologist, takes the time to explain the facts, genetics doesn't turn out to explain much, even though somehow everyone assumes they do. Once the reader understands that big piece of the puzzle, the spectrum of dementia makes so much sense it's amazing we haven't heard of it before. The case histories are wonderful; they thoughtfully expand on ideas that otherwise would remain just outside our grasp. We wouldn't think of them unless someone we knew had experienced them. I had one struggle: I wished more was said about dementia and apathy. It was just too briefly mentioned. Otherwise, this is a gem and should be widely shared. Too many friends and relatives live in quiet fear of their future and need not. I received my copy from the publisher through NetGalley. I am deeply appreciative.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nigel Shenton

    It was well written, the doctor gave appropriate empathy for things such as anxiety or ADHD diagnosis instead of brushing everything with the same brush. Saying it’s the Alzheimer’s is not ok that are the symptoms, other medication that burns less holes in the brain for depression or didn’t give fake diagnosis when the doctor thought the patient had legit worries but instead informed patients on prevention if nothing turned up on scans. No deigning condition talked about stress being key issues. It was well written, the doctor gave appropriate empathy for things such as anxiety or ADHD diagnosis instead of brushing everything with the same brush. Saying it’s the Alzheimer’s is not ok that are the symptoms, other medication that burns less holes in the brain for depression or didn’t give fake diagnosis when the doctor thought the patient had legit worries but instead informed patients on prevention if nothing turned up on scans. No deigning condition talked about stress being key issues. It was book like Norman dodges I think his name was, he may have been mentioned or thought of in it. (although I read it These busy brumal short days and I seemed to go in and out of the book working by loud machinery, I did listen to it on my four mile walk in the morning that I got to focus on it more but the rest of the day it was background noise to loud machinery.) https://ccsviinms.blogspot.ca/2017/12... Thought this was a well written about this book as well

  11. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Klein

    Reading this book made me realize that Alzheimer's Disease isn't necessarily an immediate death sentence. There are degrees of symptoms. The disease can progress rapidly or slowly. Dr. Devi's approach to her patients is centered on maintaining their sense of dignity and self worth and she concentrates on how best to achieve a satisfying way of life for them. She seems like the kind of physician/healer we all need. If you know of someone who has been diagnosed with this spectrum of disorders or j Reading this book made me realize that Alzheimer's Disease isn't necessarily an immediate death sentence. There are degrees of symptoms. The disease can progress rapidly or slowly. Dr. Devi's approach to her patients is centered on maintaining their sense of dignity and self worth and she concentrates on how best to achieve a satisfying way of life for them. She seems like the kind of physician/healer we all need. If you know of someone who has been diagnosed with this spectrum of disorders or just want to advance your understanding of Alzheimer's this is the first book you should read. It's amazingly comprehensive and offers lots of practicle suggestions.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    Workman Publishing Company and NetGalley provided me with an electronic copy of The Spectrum of Hope. I was under no obligation to review this book and my opinion is freely given. The Spectrum of Hope is a new approach to the way that individuals with Alzheimer's and other dementias are treated. By classifying the disease as a spectrum disorder, the author feels that Alzheimer's will be better understood by health professions and sufferers alike. In the author's note at the beginning, Dr. Devi ex Workman Publishing Company and NetGalley provided me with an electronic copy of The Spectrum of Hope. I was under no obligation to review this book and my opinion is freely given. The Spectrum of Hope is a new approach to the way that individuals with Alzheimer's and other dementias are treated. By classifying the disease as a spectrum disorder, the author feels that Alzheimer's will be better understood by health professions and sufferers alike. In the author's note at the beginning, Dr. Devi explains that the words dementia and Alzheimer's will be used interchangeably, but they are not the same disorder. Labeling individuals with Alzheimer's under a spectrum disorder does a real disservice to those who have the disease, giving a rosy glow to that which is very unpredictable. I thought this book was going to be about the medical approaches to Alzheimer's, but it is more like a self-help book or a diagnostic guide. It goes through subjects like how to maintain independence and fight depression, among other topics, but it does very little in describing the disease itself. It is important to have hope when facing a debilitating illness or disease, but the author should have balanced these subjects with the medical realities. My Grandmother had Alzheimer's and I would not have recommended reading The Spectrum of Hope to any of my family members. The author spent too much time on her own patients and their case studies, without giving enough medical information to give the book a solid footing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    TS

    My family is new to this disease. This book gave me a great proscriptive during this new journey. All caretakers should read this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Ceman

    easy read but I fear it offers false hope to the majority of Alzheimer's sufferers-- for example, vitamin deficiencies should be the first thing ruled out in the differential diagnosis easy read but I fear it offers false hope to the majority of Alzheimer's sufferers-- for example, vitamin deficiencies should be the first thing ruled out in the differential diagnosis

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    I enjoyed listening to her stories of those with Alzheimer's. She did a very good job of proving her point that it is a spectrum. Each person is an individual who is affected differently by this disease. It has opened up more avenues of understanding for me. I volunteer in a nursing home with my dog. We see many people with dementia. Some days they repeat many of the same conversations as before. Other times they reveal fascinating insights into a world gone by. They of course love the visits wit I enjoyed listening to her stories of those with Alzheimer's. She did a very good job of proving her point that it is a spectrum. Each person is an individual who is affected differently by this disease. It has opened up more avenues of understanding for me. I volunteer in a nursing home with my dog. We see many people with dementia. Some days they repeat many of the same conversations as before. Other times they reveal fascinating insights into a world gone by. They of course love the visits with my dog which she enjoys just as much no matter what the conversation is.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    The Spectrum of Hope by Gayatri Devi is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in late September. Each chapter is posed as a question that someone who has been newly diagnosed with Alzheimer's might be asking aloud and/or wondering about on a day to day basis - these questions are related to diagnosis, multimodal treatments, addressing ongoing symptoms, and maintaining one's independence, way of life, and individuality. I felt comfortable with Devi's narration (especially her non-case-study lingo and The Spectrum of Hope by Gayatri Devi is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in late September. Each chapter is posed as a question that someone who has been newly diagnosed with Alzheimer's might be asking aloud and/or wondering about on a day to day basis - these questions are related to diagnosis, multimodal treatments, addressing ongoing symptoms, and maintaining one's independence, way of life, and individuality. I felt comfortable with Devi's narration (especially her non-case-study lingo and referencing the conversations that she's had with patients) and how it never points directly toward one single, 'perfect' solution, but several options to consider, due to the age that someone would be at diagnosis, the stage of Alzheimer's that they have, and the range of abilities that they retain.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Most of us have known a family member or friend either with Alzheimer's or in the role of caregiver for a dementia patient. The possibility or reality of such a diagnosis strikes fear in the minds of all involved. Dr. Devi shares knowledge and perceptions gained from years of her medical practice treating the many forms of dementia. Using a multitude of case studies the author relates diagnostic and treatment options plus the many decisions and conditions that patients, family and caregivers face Most of us have known a family member or friend either with Alzheimer's or in the role of caregiver for a dementia patient. The possibility or reality of such a diagnosis strikes fear in the minds of all involved. Dr. Devi shares knowledge and perceptions gained from years of her medical practice treating the many forms of dementia. Using a multitude of case studies the author relates diagnostic and treatment options plus the many decisions and conditions that patients, family and caregivers face. For years we heard that there was no way to confirm Alzheimer's except a brain autopsy after death. Also, there was little that could be done for treatment. Some of the most valuable points in the book are that these ideas are now myths and that early diagnosis and treatment can add years and quality to a patient's life. This is not an academic medical journal nor does it contain a magical solution but as the title states it offers new understanding, optimism and hope. I found a number of the chapters address issues that apply to a broader range of eldercare and end of life decisions, not just dementia related. Dr. Devi points out that not all physicians see dementia and treatments in the same way. From this book I would know to search for a doctor and support system that does offer positive treatment and hope. Not everyone can find the same expertise and empathy as Dr. Devi but we can gain from her sharing and optimism. A number of friends and family will receive a copy of this book from me when it hits the shelves. Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for an ARC of this title.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christine Stafford

    Every single person should read this book. The spectrum of dementia/alzheimers is so wide and there are so many misconceptions. What an inspiring and positive book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Karen K.

    Contrary to popular opinion, a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is not a death sentence. Recent developments in neuroscience offer hope to those affected by Alzheimer’s. Dr. Devi’s book is required reading for those who fear they may be losing their memory, and especially for caregivers and friends of those already diagnosed. Diagnosis itself is complex, and it's essential to get an early workup in order to establish early interventions or to sort out other conditions that also affect memory and Contrary to popular opinion, a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is not a death sentence. Recent developments in neuroscience offer hope to those affected by Alzheimer’s. Dr. Devi’s book is required reading for those who fear they may be losing their memory, and especially for caregivers and friends of those already diagnosed. Diagnosis itself is complex, and it's essential to get an early workup in order to establish early interventions or to sort out other conditions that also affect memory and daily functions. According to Dr. Devi, Alzheimer’s is a spectrum of maladies, similar to autism. It’s not an absolute disease like measles. Depending on the area of the brain affected - and circumstantial factors in a patient’s genetic, health, and lifestyle profile - the label “Alzheimer’s” is complex, variable, and manageable beyond what popular culture has previously reflected. THE SPECTRUM OF HOPE narrates a wealth of patient case studies, written in anecdotal and accessible tone. Dr. Devi balances her case studies with facts about medication, lifestyle modification, and caregivers’ roles. Reading this book dispelled some of my fears about mental decline, and at the same time offered ideas for interacting empathically with friends and family members affected by Alzheimer’s. This review is based on an ARC from NetGalley.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christina Dudley

    I gave this very good book a quick read. Dr. Devi's perspective is new in that she characterizes Alzheimer's as a spectrum disorder, as individual in its progress as the person suffering. She wants people diagnosed as early as possible, so they can hit back with diet, exercise, mental exercises and stimulation, and drugs. Many of her patients were able to recognize loved ones till the end and function above and beyond society's expectations. Sadly it didn't give me any hope for my mother-in-law, I gave this very good book a quick read. Dr. Devi's perspective is new in that she characterizes Alzheimer's as a spectrum disorder, as individual in its progress as the person suffering. She wants people diagnosed as early as possible, so they can hit back with diet, exercise, mental exercises and stimulation, and drugs. Many of her patients were able to recognize loved ones till the end and function above and beyond society's expectations. Sadly it didn't give me any hope for my mother-in-law, who has always denied her condition and refused to participate in any therapies or exercise. Alzheimer's drugs alone don't seem to do much, in her case. But it's absolutely true that she's hanging on to language and self-care skills very well, considering her memory problems. If you have a loved one who's been diagnosed or have been diagnosed yourself, I highly recommend this book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    What a helpful book! My mother was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. She’s likely had it for the last several years ...but so excellently “covered” for her disease, only those seeing her on a daily basis would realize something was “off” with her. This book was just excellent in laying out various scenarios and at the same time helping to answer questions for those of us serving as caregivers. I could see mother in many of these scenarios, and feel I have a much better understanding of what sh What a helpful book! My mother was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. She’s likely had it for the last several years ...but so excellently “covered” for her disease, only those seeing her on a daily basis would realize something was “off” with her. This book was just excellent in laying out various scenarios and at the same time helping to answer questions for those of us serving as caregivers. I could see mother in many of these scenarios, and feel I have a much better understanding of what she is experiencing after reading this helpful book. It is truly a book for patients and caregivers alike.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    Information for the future Occasionally I felt that the author was TOO positive, since I have personal experience dealing with frontal temporal dementia and have been a caregiver for an extended period. But it is wonderful to know that there are doctors of this caliber out there even if I've not met them. It was also good to learn about some of the advances in Alzheimer's treatment, should I ever need them. Information for the future Occasionally I felt that the author was TOO positive, since I have personal experience dealing with frontal temporal dementia and have been a caregiver for an extended period. But it is wonderful to know that there are doctors of this caliber out there even if I've not met them. It was also good to learn about some of the advances in Alzheimer's treatment, should I ever need them.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Colette

    Viewing dementia as a spectrum disorder makes so much sense and fits my experience with loved ones affected by dementia. The author is able to present new and useful information.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carol Custer

    Nobody used to talk about Alzheimer's or dementia much less admit they were worried it might happen to them! But as the Baby Boomers age, the topic is becoming more and more relevant. This book is easy to read and gives some valuable information about the different stages of Alzheimer's and dementia. It's fascinating to read. Nobody used to talk about Alzheimer's or dementia much less admit they were worried it might happen to them! But as the Baby Boomers age, the topic is becoming more and more relevant. This book is easy to read and gives some valuable information about the different stages of Alzheimer's and dementia. It's fascinating to read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robin O'Brien

    Wow every person and their caregivers should have a doctor like Dr. Devi. She is not only compassionate but is progressive in her treatment options for those suffering from Alzheimer's Disease. She understands how consistency in life helps these victims and provides them with dignity from the time of diagnosis until the day they die. Wow every person and their caregivers should have a doctor like Dr. Devi. She is not only compassionate but is progressive in her treatment options for those suffering from Alzheimer's Disease. She understands how consistency in life helps these victims and provides them with dignity from the time of diagnosis until the day they die.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    I am so thankful the author took the time to write this book! With the baby boomer's aging, it is needed now more than ever. I really enjoyed reading the case studies & how it offers hope as one goes through this journey. I am so thankful the author took the time to write this book! With the baby boomer's aging, it is needed now more than ever. I really enjoyed reading the case studies & how it offers hope as one goes through this journey.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle H Finnigan

    Every family needs to read about dementia Great storytelling that weaves the issues in a way no one else has shared. There is much more that can be done if we could u understand that every case is unique

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    From a caregiver standpoint, I found this book f ar more helpful (and encouraging) than other, more clinical, treatments on the subject.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carol Turner

    I wish my mom had had Dr Devi, or someone like her, while she was going thru Alzheimer's. This gives me real hope for the future. I wish my mom had had Dr Devi, or someone like her, while she was going thru Alzheimer's. This gives me real hope for the future.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Worthwhile Upbeat good read. Great outlook for seniors, not as hopeless as most people think. Simplifies a complex disease by seeing actual cases..

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