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In the tradition of the instant bestsellers The Intellectual Devotional and The Intellectual Devotional: American History comes the third installment in this indispensable series. In The Intellectual Devotional: Modern Culture, authors David S. Kidder and Noah D. Oppenheim explore the fascinating world of contemporary culture to offer 365 daily readings that provide the es In the tradition of the instant bestsellers The Intellectual Devotional and The Intellectual Devotional: American History comes the third installment in this indispensable series. In The Intellectual Devotional: Modern Culture, authors David S. Kidder and Noah D. Oppenheim explore the fascinating world of contemporary culture to offer 365 daily readings that provide the essential references needed to navigate the world today. Quench your intellectual thirst with an overview of the literature, music, film, personalities, trends, sports, and pop references that have defined the way we live. From the Slinky to Star Wars; Beatlemania to Babe Ruth; flappers to fascism—refreshing your memory and dazzling your friends has never been easier, or more fun. Whether you're a trivia genius, pop-culture buff, or avid reader, you'll be riveted by this comprehensive journey through contemporary culture.


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In the tradition of the instant bestsellers The Intellectual Devotional and The Intellectual Devotional: American History comes the third installment in this indispensable series. In The Intellectual Devotional: Modern Culture, authors David S. Kidder and Noah D. Oppenheim explore the fascinating world of contemporary culture to offer 365 daily readings that provide the es In the tradition of the instant bestsellers The Intellectual Devotional and The Intellectual Devotional: American History comes the third installment in this indispensable series. In The Intellectual Devotional: Modern Culture, authors David S. Kidder and Noah D. Oppenheim explore the fascinating world of contemporary culture to offer 365 daily readings that provide the essential references needed to navigate the world today. Quench your intellectual thirst with an overview of the literature, music, film, personalities, trends, sports, and pop references that have defined the way we live. From the Slinky to Star Wars; Beatlemania to Babe Ruth; flappers to fascism—refreshing your memory and dazzling your friends has never been easier, or more fun. Whether you're a trivia genius, pop-culture buff, or avid reader, you'll be riveted by this comprehensive journey through contemporary culture.

30 review for The Intellectual Devotional Modern Culture: Revive Your Mind, Complete Your Education, and Converse Confidently with the Culturati

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The book has 365 entries (one for each day of the year, one page each) that cover 7 fields of "culture". Everything from music, literature, politics, etc. Great book if you need something short or something you can browse quickly. Basically, a trivia book. A few things I liked about this book: - It beats reading shampoo labels at the toilet - It provides lots of factoids, or useless bits of information that you may use for small chat (I didn't have a clue that Winston Churchill won the Literature The book has 365 entries (one for each day of the year, one page each) that cover 7 fields of "culture". Everything from music, literature, politics, etc. Great book if you need something short or something you can browse quickly. Basically, a trivia book. A few things I liked about this book: - It beats reading shampoo labels at the toilet - It provides lots of factoids, or useless bits of information that you may use for small chat (I didn't have a clue that Winston Churchill won the Literature Nobel Prize, or that Nirvana's "Smells like teen spirit" song's title refers to a deodorant brand). But then I don't know a lot of things - It has a hard cover - I paid 2 bucks for it A few things I didn't like about the book: - The subtitle is completely misleading ("Revive your mind"???????, "Complete your education"?????). Give me a break, guys: that is a "bit" too ambitious of a title - It is extremely US-centered (well, the world is, but I would have loved to see a broader, more international perspective). Specially, a very large percentage of the sports entries were US-related - Not being a sports-fan, I found the level of sports trivia excessive

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marcia Haskell

    My husband and I read one page a night and if the info is interesting or unknown to either of us we discuss the implication of the subject. The subjects covered in this the second volume of this series are: Politics & Leadership, War & Peace, Rights & Reforms, Business, Building America, Literature and Arts. My husband and I read one page a night and if the info is interesting or unknown to either of us we discuss the implication of the subject. The subjects covered in this the second volume of this series are: Politics & Leadership, War & Peace, Rights & Reforms, Business, Building America, Literature and Arts.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Roberta Wall

    Very interesting format

  4. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    If anyone has read my reviews you know that I've read maaaaany variations on this theme. This particular book doesn't try to be funny or clever, just sticks to being informative and succinct. While I respect that, I wouldn't necessarily call it "entertaining"---just very serviceable. I liked the format with the explanation followed by a few related highlights (such as almost-too-weird-to-be-true related factoids like George Gershwin and Aaron Copland had the same piano teacher. Truth!) What coul If anyone has read my reviews you know that I've read maaaaany variations on this theme. This particular book doesn't try to be funny or clever, just sticks to being informative and succinct. While I respect that, I wouldn't necessarily call it "entertaining"---just very serviceable. I liked the format with the explanation followed by a few related highlights (such as almost-too-weird-to-be-true related factoids like George Gershwin and Aaron Copland had the same piano teacher. Truth!) What could have been better was the variety. There seemed to be an awful lot of baseball players and jazz musicians for example, and as much as I love both, to spend an inordinate amount of time addressing two specific areas kind of misses the whole point. Perhaps not quite as good as The Book of General Ignorance but quite a bit better than Don't Know Much About Anything: Everything You Need to Know But Never Learned.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    I loved this book. I have read the one on history also. I am always learning something new or being reminded of something I forgot. It has added greatly to my "books I want to read" list. It is indeed a book that gives conversation starters. Just plain fun to read. It can be read a day at a time or straight through. I am too eager to see what is next for the day at a time routine, but if you only have a few minutes a day to read; this is the book for you!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kimber

    Remember those daily devotional for religion same thing. But for those who what something to ponder on the way home. I got this book third. I have hardback and kindle versions of these books. I stuffed notes and research items in the hardbacks. I can add notes to my kindle versions. I enjoy them and since my kindle goes everywhere with me. I always have something to read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    I love this whole series! I read it in chunks between other books, even if it is meant to be read one entry per day. Worth the read. Some entries make me want to just go read more about the subject.

  8. 4 out of 5

    John

    While the section on literature was interesting (although I was familiar with all the writers presented), there are topics presented that are just not "intellectual". Not to speak too dismissively, but why is "Beatlemania", "Star Wars", "Friends", and the "Slinky" considered intellectual? That's pop culture. Get a little more esoteric with your theories and idol worship. 365 topics is not that HARD of a list.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Scott Hayden

    Good source to up your Trivial Pursuit game. Each entry, just one page, summarizes a person or event that this author thinks you ought to know if you want to be considered intellectually with it. In that way, it make quite quick, curious reading. Occasionally makes irrelevant comments about deviancy. Annoying. I picked it up because it was free. Now that I've read it, I'm glad I didn't spend money on it. I think I'll put it back in the "free pile" in the teacher's room where I found it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I want to say I love this book, but there are a few little errors in it 🤨 that have been noticed, which is disappointing. It's so jam-packed with interesting info and cultural history, but knowing a few mistakes got through saddens me... what about ones I didn't catch? Seriously, this is a freaking great overview of the 20th century, though.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Miles

    Entertaining trivia, ideal for bathroom reading! It was definitely interesting to read this in 2019, eleven years after it was published, to see how many of the recent pop culture icons had fallen from grace during that period - Woody Allen, Bill Cosby, Lance Armstrong, and Tiger Woods. Lots of fun and interesting trivia in here.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tracey Kunkel

    Very informative but interesting

  13. 4 out of 5

    Errol S.

    Interesting The book is interesting, but given the format can sometimes leave you wanting more. This is my second book. I’m likely to read another.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mercedes McLean-Wheeler

    I learned some interesting things. We’ll see what I remember of them, but it was nice to be introduced to important topics that I don’t always seek out independently.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    The Intellectual Devotional: Modern Culture by David S. Kidder and Noah D. Oppenhiem was by far their best. The addition of contributing editor, Alan Wirzbicki, and contributing writers, Daniel K. Fleschner and Kristen Myer, is definitely noticeable. The devotional includes 365 daily readings, organized into seven categories: personalities, literature, music, film, ideas and trends, sports, and pop culture. Since the copyright date is 2008, some of the material seems dated and not ‘modern cultur The Intellectual Devotional: Modern Culture by David S. Kidder and Noah D. Oppenhiem was by far their best. The addition of contributing editor, Alan Wirzbicki, and contributing writers, Daniel K. Fleschner and Kristen Myer, is definitely noticeable. The devotional includes 365 daily readings, organized into seven categories: personalities, literature, music, film, ideas and trends, sports, and pop culture. Since the copyright date is 2008, some of the material seems dated and not ‘modern culture’ anymore. However, that does not make it irrelevant and/or uninteresting. This was the third Intellectual Devotional that my husband and I have shared. We read one or two entries daily with one of our meals, giving us food for thought and discussion. All of the Intellectual Devotionals are great for shared reading. Intellectual Devotional: Modern Culture is the best that we’ve read so far. We’re currently reading the Intellectual Devotional: Health. Stay tuned, as our favorite may change!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Rathbun

    This book contains 365 short pages summing up modern culture in music, literature, film, sports, ideas/trends, personality, and "pop." One page for each item allows for only a brief view so the focus is sharp and succinct. I was pleased to see that I was familiar with most of them (Yay! Does that mean I'm one of the culturati or only capable of conversing with them?), but there were several that it helped to have more fleshing out of the vague impressions I had. A couple people I hadn't heard of This book contains 365 short pages summing up modern culture in music, literature, film, sports, ideas/trends, personality, and "pop." One page for each item allows for only a brief view so the focus is sharp and succinct. I was pleased to see that I was familiar with most of them (Yay! Does that mean I'm one of the culturati or only capable of conversing with them?), but there were several that it helped to have more fleshing out of the vague impressions I had. A couple people I hadn't heard of included Rod Laver and Brian Eno. This reminded me of E. D. Hirsch and his works on Cultural Literacy. I'm glad I found this at a thrift store and would like to read more in the series. It presents a great overview for someone not ready for an indepth read but wanting to be conversant with some major influences of the 20th century. (The book was published in 2009 so it is not totally current, but that doesn't change what is presented here, imo.)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eling

    I think I like the idea of these books better than the actual books. I do appreciate the concept of having just a page to read a day (I read a few on some days, none on others) and there is lots of good introductory information here on quite a selection of subjects. However, the vaguely opinionated tone on a number of the entries got to me after a while-- I guess if you're reading this to "converse confidently" you want to have an opinion-- but I didn't like that the default opinion seemed a lit I think I like the idea of these books better than the actual books. I do appreciate the concept of having just a page to read a day (I read a few on some days, none on others) and there is lots of good introductory information here on quite a selection of subjects. However, the vaguely opinionated tone on a number of the entries got to me after a while-- I guess if you're reading this to "converse confidently" you want to have an opinion-- but I didn't like that the default opinion seemed a little condescending; it definitely leaned a certain way.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cyndie Courtney

    A fantastic description of modern culture references focused from about the beginning of the 1900 onwards. Definitely suffers from one of the risks of writing a book like this (becoming quickly irrelevant) but in ways that were often fascinating especially when coming across 2008 versions of pages on "Gay Rights" (no countrywide gay marriage rights in US yet) and "Donald Trump" (no 2016 presidential run yet). Really enjoy this series overall and especially enjoyed this modern take on the classic A fantastic description of modern culture references focused from about the beginning of the 1900 onwards. Definitely suffers from one of the risks of writing a book like this (becoming quickly irrelevant) but in ways that were often fascinating especially when coming across 2008 versions of pages on "Gay Rights" (no countrywide gay marriage rights in US yet) and "Donald Trump" (no 2016 presidential run yet). Really enjoy this series overall and especially enjoyed this modern take on the classic version.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Roberts

    This is a great new format for a daily reading book. There are seven different topics, one for each day of the week, which include Arts, Science, Biography, History. Each day has a short 1-2 page essay on the topic of the day, with some interesting additional facts at the end of each one. I liked this well enough to decide to read each of the other ones in the series (one per year!) This one is the place to start, as the authors cover more breadth in this 7 topic category book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    I know these books are supposed to take a year to read, but I have neither the time nor the patience for such an endeavor. I love this series anyway & recommend for anyone looking for a daily devotional. It's a good time, but not as informative as the first one. I hope they keep adding new editions, maybe one with more foreign affairs. I know these books are supposed to take a year to read, but I have neither the time nor the patience for such an endeavor. I love this series anyway & recommend for anyone looking for a daily devotional. It's a good time, but not as informative as the first one. I hope they keep adding new editions, maybe one with more foreign affairs.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Kukwa

    What a fabulous, one-stop little primer of historical & biographical tidbits. For every subject you might be familiar with, you'll find another that will delightfully surprise and inform. Concise, yet bursting with little details. A great addition to anyone's history library...and a great refresher for those who believe they've forgotten much of what they once studied. What a fabulous, one-stop little primer of historical & biographical tidbits. For every subject you might be familiar with, you'll find another that will delightfully surprise and inform. Concise, yet bursting with little details. A great addition to anyone's history library...and a great refresher for those who believe they've forgotten much of what they once studied.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    A great way to kill time and find subjects for further study and reading (from other books). Just not really my style. And if you actually know something about one of the subjects it's discussing you will realize just how much it doesn't teach/tell you. We're talking extremely brief touches on interesting topics. But just that, nothing more.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    This style book is nice of very short daily page reads, though I didn't keep up well & read more pages one day & none at all another day, but I got it finished. Founds some reads more interesting than other ones but I learned a bit from the book. I enjoyed the little extra small notes on each page as well. This style book is nice of very short daily page reads, though I didn't keep up well & read more pages one day & none at all another day, but I got it finished. Founds some reads more interesting than other ones but I learned a bit from the book. I enjoyed the little extra small notes on each page as well.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    The Intellectual Devotional series consistently delivers highly diverting content at the perfect pace. I particularly like this one due to its wide span. From slinkies to hula hoops, Madonna to Tonya Harding…this thing has got it all. I recommend you take the year; it’s a nice leisurely stroll.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    I like this series and read them like a daily devotional, but I liked the more historical ones better. Any book that includes daily reads on Rush Limbaugh, Donald Trump, and the Friends tv show isn't teaching me very much.

  26. 5 out of 5

    TJ Jackson

    The seems like a book for everybody here ... or a book that as a team everyone here could have written ...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I feel smarter already.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Jem

    I learned so much from this book. The film entries were especially interesting and informative.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    "Formed in Boston in 1984, New Kids on the Block was a peppy, all-male pop group that for a brief, terrifying moment appeared to represent the future of American popular music."

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    I will be reading this book for 2010

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