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A Trilogia de Thrawn, uma das mais aclamadas obras do universo expandido de Star Wars, chega a Portugal na sua adaptação a BD, uma recompilação num único volume de todas as adaptações da Banda Desenhada da famosa trilogia de romances de Timothy Zahn, que narram os acontecimentos após o Regresso de Jedi. Um livro imprescindível para os fãs da saga. Uma oportunidade excelent A Trilogia de Thrawn, uma das mais aclamadas obras do universo expandido de Star Wars, chega a Portugal na sua adaptação a BD, uma recompilação num único volume de todas as adaptações da Banda Desenhada da famosa trilogia de romances de Timothy Zahn, que narram os acontecimentos após o Regresso de Jedi. Um livro imprescindível para os fãs da saga. Uma oportunidade excelente para introduzir-nos e conhecer o universo expandido de Star Wars.


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A Trilogia de Thrawn, uma das mais aclamadas obras do universo expandido de Star Wars, chega a Portugal na sua adaptação a BD, uma recompilação num único volume de todas as adaptações da Banda Desenhada da famosa trilogia de romances de Timothy Zahn, que narram os acontecimentos após o Regresso de Jedi. Um livro imprescindível para os fãs da saga. Uma oportunidade excelent A Trilogia de Thrawn, uma das mais aclamadas obras do universo expandido de Star Wars, chega a Portugal na sua adaptação a BD, uma recompilação num único volume de todas as adaptações da Banda Desenhada da famosa trilogia de romances de Timothy Zahn, que narram os acontecimentos após o Regresso de Jedi. Um livro imprescindível para os fãs da saga. Uma oportunidade excelente para introduzir-nos e conhecer o universo expandido de Star Wars.

30 review for Star Wars: A Trilogia de Thrawn

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    Forget the garbage that Disney handed us; the Thrawn trilogy is the true followup to Lucas' original space operas. Why the House of Mouse didn't just adapt these stories into celluloid form, I'll never know; after The Last Jedi, the franchise is in desperate need of a reboot. While the original novels were wonders to behold, these comics weren't as good as they could have been. Too much wasted space was a big problem, and, in the first set of comics, Leia didn't even look pregnant at all, let alo Forget the garbage that Disney handed us; the Thrawn trilogy is the true followup to Lucas' original space operas. Why the House of Mouse didn't just adapt these stories into celluloid form, I'll never know; after The Last Jedi, the franchise is in desperate need of a reboot. While the original novels were wonders to behold, these comics weren't as good as they could have been. Too much wasted space was a big problem, and, in the first set of comics, Leia didn't even look pregnant at all, let alone with twins. The art wasn't as good as it could have been; some of the characters barely resembled their film counterparts in some scenes. Still, when it comes to Star Wars, you could do much worse, especially if you've seen it at a cinema in the last several years.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo

    Not happy with the way The Last Jedi ended for a few of your cherished icons? This collection of a trio of miniseries from the Dark Horse years could be the story for you! In this adaptation of Timothy Zahn's novels, read of the tales of the original triumvirate of Luke, Han, and Leia at the height of their powers after the decisive Battle of Endor. Read of how the newly restored new Republic was almost lost, when the most capable of the Empire's Grand Admirals returned from the unknown regions a Not happy with the way The Last Jedi ended for a few of your cherished icons? This collection of a trio of miniseries from the Dark Horse years could be the story for you! In this adaptation of Timothy Zahn's novels, read of the tales of the original triumvirate of Luke, Han, and Leia at the height of their powers after the decisive Battle of Endor. Read of how the newly restored new Republic was almost lost, when the most capable of the Empire's Grand Admirals returned from the unknown regions and single highhandedly made the remnants of a fallen empire relevant again. Thrawn was Snoke before The Force Awakens was a disclosure in Disney's accounting records, and a way better villain. This is the good stuff, and the older fans know it. These stories and their ilk are no longer canon, as Disney deemed it, but probably because the House of the Mouse couldn't trust itself to create good Star Wars stories in the vein of the originals.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    Maybe I should have read the books before this adaptation?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Diz

    This graphic novel adapts the Thrawn Trilogy of novels. I've never read those, so my review will be based solely on these comics. As I was reading this, I felt that it would have been nice to get Star Wars sequel movies that focused on the relationships of the three main characters from the original movies. That's basically what we get here. Luke, Leia, and Han get lots to do and they have plenty of opportunities to interact with each other. Strangely, Thrawn himself doesn't have much of a prese This graphic novel adapts the Thrawn Trilogy of novels. I've never read those, so my review will be based solely on these comics. As I was reading this, I felt that it would have been nice to get Star Wars sequel movies that focused on the relationships of the three main characters from the original movies. That's basically what we get here. Luke, Leia, and Han get lots to do and they have plenty of opportunities to interact with each other. Strangely, Thrawn himself doesn't have much of a presence. He never really feels that threatening. Rogue smugglers and Master C'Baoth actually seem much more threatening. Finally, I really enjoyed the art style use here. It's much better than the weird photorealistic art style used in the current Marvel Star Wars series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    You remember the books fondly, and since they'll never be filmed a graphic adaptation is the next best thing, right? And the adapter says all the right things in the introduction - including what I thought at the time to be a wonderful line about all the lines being pure Zahn. But when you read it, all the lines are Timothy Zahn, and only Timothy Zahn. No boxed captions, no exposition, no summaries or transitions. What seemed like benevolence and care on the part of a thoughtful adapter was actu You remember the books fondly, and since they'll never be filmed a graphic adaptation is the next best thing, right? And the adapter says all the right things in the introduction - including what I thought at the time to be a wonderful line about all the lines being pure Zahn. But when you read it, all the lines are Timothy Zahn, and only Timothy Zahn. No boxed captions, no exposition, no summaries or transitions. What seemed like benevolence and care on the part of a thoughtful adapter was actually veiled laziness - cutting and pasting dialog being the extent of his effort - making this more of a cheated up term paper than original work. The result is flat characters, an empty story, and precious little emotional involvement on the part of the reader.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    9 ABY This graphic novel trilogy follows the same story as the three novels, but with a few things switched around a bit for the sake of visual flow. In short, Heir to the Empire introduces us to Grand Admiral Thrawn, who has seemingly taken the Emperor’s place, and some members of the New Republic have a hard time believing that there could possibly even be another Grand admiral that they did not know about. We are also introduced to Mara Jade, former Hand to the Emperor and a current second to 9 ABY This graphic novel trilogy follows the same story as the three novels, but with a few things switched around a bit for the sake of visual flow. In short, Heir to the Empire introduces us to Grand Admiral Thrawn, who has seemingly taken the Emperor’s place, and some members of the New Republic have a hard time believing that there could possibly even be another Grand admiral that they did not know about. We are also introduced to Mara Jade, former Hand to the Emperor and a current second to Talon Karrde, a renowned smuggler. Thrawn has a plan to take the Emperor’s old cloning facility on Wayland, steal some fabled dreadnaughts, and create a whole new army, but cloned Jedi Master C’baoth stops him. With his wit, Thrawn aims to use the Jedi Master to his needs, but he will need some ysalmiri (creatures who naturally reject the Force) to help him keep control over the Jedi Master. Meanwhile, Leia is pregnant with Jedi twins, and Luke is being hunted by both Thrawn and Mara! The main feature of Dark Force Rising is basically a race to see who can find the fabled Katana Fleet with its 200 Dreadnaught class ships first, the Empire or the New Republic. With Thrawn having his own secret Intel within the palace on Coruscant, nothing is safe to speak of. And of course, it all wraps up in The Last Command, where Luke must face himself, and Mara must come to terms with whether she can kill Luke Skywalker as the Emperor’s last command. To see more full summaries of the actual novel check them out on my website where I have a full page review of each book in the series: https://teresacrider.wordpress.com/20... Some things about the graphic novel: it is very text-heavy with an annoying font. The amount of text per page is nearly overwhelming, since I red graphic novels for the art as well. The font is confusing, because the H’s look like U’s and I had to reread a few different things. The art is older too, the images not representing the characters in a very attractive light, but the space ships and battles (and basically everything except people) are finely detailed, which is nice. The flow is also confusing at many times, because the way the speech bubbles are drawn and the way the dialogue is supposed to go is not clear at all, and I reread many of those parts as well. Overall, a cool collectible to have, but possibly not worth the time it takes to read because of the text-heavy convolutedness of the graphic novel. Try the novels, though; I greatly enjoyed those!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Scott Terbush

    I don't think the Star Wars Universe would be what it is today without this book. Not only was it one of the first books in the Universe, it was really good. It opened the door to dozens and dozens of books and trilogies (not all good). It was rare that any universe book was as good as these were. So if you are thinking about joining the universe, start here. I don't think the Star Wars Universe would be what it is today without this book. Not only was it one of the first books in the Universe, it was really good. It opened the door to dozens and dozens of books and trilogies (not all good). It was rare that any universe book was as good as these were. So if you are thinking about joining the universe, start here.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Sorrentino

    Adaptations of three novels into graphic novels all in one volume! I remember reading the books and enjoying them. The comics are great. The narrative is easy to follow, but the art is really spectacular. I feel that Star Wars really benefits from visual storytelling. Perhaps at some points the story feels abridged. Maybe I'd get more reading the novel than the graphic novel edition. Adaptations of three novels into graphic novels all in one volume! I remember reading the books and enjoying them. The comics are great. The narrative is easy to follow, but the art is really spectacular. I feel that Star Wars really benefits from visual storytelling. Perhaps at some points the story feels abridged. Maybe I'd get more reading the novel than the graphic novel edition.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Trekscribbler

    A bit of a history lesson here is necessary for the uninitiated. Odds are that there will be few (uninitiated) here, given that most drawn to this review will have working familiarity with the subject matter, but I'll supply a few details from memory anyhow. Call it posterity. Once the lights in the theatre went out on STAR WARS: EPISODE 6: RETURN OF THE JEDI, serious Star Wars enthusiasts had no idea when (or even if) they'd be treated to another adventure in their most favorite cinematic unive A bit of a history lesson here is necessary for the uninitiated. Odds are that there will be few (uninitiated) here, given that most drawn to this review will have working familiarity with the subject matter, but I'll supply a few details from memory anyhow. Call it posterity. Once the lights in the theatre went out on STAR WARS: EPISODE 6: RETURN OF THE JEDI, serious Star Wars enthusiasts had no idea when (or even if) they'd be treated to another adventure in their most favorite cinematic universe. The original trilogy had come to its close with mild controversy (Ewoks? Really, George? Were they necessary?) with some fanfare -- after seriously amping up the stakes in THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK -- and 1983 seemed to bring an end to the continuing adventures of Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, and the rest of the gang. Then, in 1992, science fiction novelist Timothy Zahn's new trilogy of Star Wars tales began, and it reminded Star Wars fans everywhere of the latent potential still lingering like a welcome disturbance in the Force in that galaxy far, far away. Over the course of the next few years, Zahn did as Lucas had done with the original trilogy, amping up the stakes just a little bit at each crazy turn, whetting fandom's appetite for even more visits to these distant worlds ... and the good folks at Dark Horse Comics were all too happy to oblige. Eventually, Dark Horse stumbled onto the brilliant idea to adapt Zahn's books; these novels had, after all, earned a special place in the hearts of most Star Wars fans, so much so that most consider these outings as unofficial Episodes 7, 8, and 9, picking up the events of Luke & company nearly a decade after JEDI ended. Dark Horse completed three miniseries adaptations -- each with six issues, each miniseries focusing on one of Zahn's novels -- ultimately and inevitably re-releasing each of these three miniseries in trade paperback forms, and now Dark Horse Books has finally put them all together in one grand spanking adventure. At over 400 pages, STAR WARS: THE THRAWN TRILOGY is the ultimate fan package, returning Star Wars fans to the excitement they felt with each passing chapter of Zahn's massive adventure. It's not a light undertaking in the slightest: these comics go to great lengths to capture the details of the books, bringing many new characters, worlds, ships, and situations that, honestly, fit like a glove in Lucas's fantastic universe. In a nutshell, the New Republic has grown to encompass many worlds, but elements of the Empire -- namely, several surviving ships, bases, and one nasty Grand Admiral Thrawn -- have come across data that indicates the Emperor held a few tricks up his sleeve even in death. A hidden Dark Jedi Master ... ship cloaking technology ... and a mountain fortress complete with cloning cylinders mean that the return of the Empire has always remained a virtually galactic heartbeat away, leaving Adm. Thrawn to hatch his plan to return the forces of evil to reign in the galaxy. Standing in his way? The usual suspects of Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, Lando Calrissian, and they each have special roles to play, alongside a growing legion of smugglers and Rebel fighter pilots ... Read closely, and you'll find it hard to believe that the theatres were dark with new cinematic Star Wars adventures for two decades! Zahn weaves his tale with several new faces and even some new twists on the ol' ones, and he brings an adult, dramatic, treacherous sensibility to bare on every development. THE THRAWN TRILOGY is a massive undertaking -- wouldn't it be great to get three more Star Wars stories up on the silver screen -- and, while it might not be to everyone's liking, it certainly tickled mosts fancies when so little else was happening in this universe. While some of the events feel a bit rushed toward the end of the collection, this is one story worth visiting again and again, not only for nostalgia but also because it's great to have Star Wars making all of us feel like a kid again. May the Force be with you. Always.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marcus Hutchens

    It's better as a complete story than as 3 separate chapters, but overall doesn't live up to the Star Wars name. Decent artwork to support the story, but it changes drastically between parts. Worthwhile for Star Wars fans. 3.5/5 It's better as a complete story than as 3 separate chapters, but overall doesn't live up to the Star Wars name. Decent artwork to support the story, but it changes drastically between parts. Worthwhile for Star Wars fans. 3.5/5

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Livingston

    I recommend this for those that don't want to read the trilogy but would rather see it in a comic or for fans of the series that would like to see it in comic form. The artwork was good i.e. the characters looked more or less like who they were supposed to and everyone was in proportion. I gave it a 2 star rating because I read the trilogy and gave them all two stars too. It was interesting to see it in comic form but it didn't make me like the story, characters any better. I recommend this for those that don't want to read the trilogy but would rather see it in a comic or for fans of the series that would like to see it in comic form. The artwork was good i.e. the characters looked more or less like who they were supposed to and everyone was in proportion. I gave it a 2 star rating because I read the trilogy and gave them all two stars too. It was interesting to see it in comic form but it didn't make me like the story, characters any better.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amalia Dillin

    I remember reading these three novels ~1996-97, so these adaptations felt like a refresher course, and while the art was fun, definitely it was missing some of the depth the novels provided (and that I found myself remembering while I read.) Overall, it was a more satisfying experience than the novelization of The Force Awakens I read just before it -- but I'm not sure if that's just nostalgia and familiarity or what. I mean, definitely it has weird pieces, like the obsession everyone has with s I remember reading these three novels ~1996-97, so these adaptations felt like a refresher course, and while the art was fun, definitely it was missing some of the depth the novels provided (and that I found myself remembering while I read.) Overall, it was a more satisfying experience than the novelization of The Force Awakens I read just before it -- but I'm not sure if that's just nostalgia and familiarity or what. I mean, definitely it has weird pieces, like the obsession everyone has with stealing Leia and her unborn twin children to turn them to the dark side mwahahaha (despite the fact that there aren't really a lot of people with the skills required to turn anyone?); and the way that Thrawn seems to know everything all the time and consistently be 5 steps ahead of the New Republic by what amounts to just... magic, it feels like at times. Buuuuuuuuuuuuuut. I can't help but still feel like Thrawn is a stronger villain than Snoke, ultimately, and his Empire is more interesting than the First Order. but again, that could just be because it's what I was raised on.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael Kikle

    Whether it be the actual novels or this, I'm just not impressed, whatsoever. There's even times from Heir to the Empire to Dark Force Rising that they change Luke's lightsaber blade color, simply because no one knew what Zahn had chosen, in that regard. A lot of it, I think, is to be blamed on Zahn. These adaptations are not great, but are at least shorter than the novels, praise Jesus. Thrawn is an underwhelming villain; I'll always stand by that. Even Luke is wasted, here! He's such a good cha Whether it be the actual novels or this, I'm just not impressed, whatsoever. There's even times from Heir to the Empire to Dark Force Rising that they change Luke's lightsaber blade color, simply because no one knew what Zahn had chosen, in that regard. A lot of it, I think, is to be blamed on Zahn. These adaptations are not great, but are at least shorter than the novels, praise Jesus. Thrawn is an underwhelming villain; I'll always stand by that. Even Luke is wasted, here! He's such a good character, and yet this trilogy always seems to make him the last resort in any problem they come across, when I feel like Star Wars should have always been Luke's real, owned story. Freakin' LEIA has more screen time than Luke. Like, are you kidding?!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rune Bach

    A great revisit I enjoyed the books and this was a stroll down Star Wars memory lane. The art work is fantastic and love the different choices the artists made from book to book. The storytelling is enjoyable and fast paced, maybe people a little to fast paced for fans who have not read the books.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alex Diaz-Granados

    This 420-page hardcover volume is a collection of the 17 separate issues writer Mike Baron adapted from Zahn's best-selling trilogy. The dust jacket features artwork by Matthieu Lauffray, whose style is reminiscent of legendar illustrator Drew Struzan. The book contains, for the first time in one volume, Baron's adaptations of: Heir to the Empire: Five years after the destruction of the second Death Star and the deaths of Emperor Palpatine and Darth Vader, all's not going idyllically for the stru This 420-page hardcover volume is a collection of the 17 separate issues writer Mike Baron adapted from Zahn's best-selling trilogy. The dust jacket features artwork by Matthieu Lauffray, whose style is reminiscent of legendar illustrator Drew Struzan. The book contains, for the first time in one volume, Baron's adaptations of: Heir to the Empire: Five years after the destruction of the second Death Star and the deaths of Emperor Palpatine and Darth Vader, all's not going idyllically for the struggling New Republic. The Jedi Order has yet to be re-established, and political intrigue within the new government is as big a threat to stability and democracy as the remnants of the once-mighty Empire. Though the New Republic is in control of three-quarters of the Empire's former territory, the former Rebel Alliance is stretched thin as it fights a seemingly-endless war against Imperial forces still refusing to admit defeat. And though many of the galaxy's inhabitants believe it is a matter of time until the Empire is vanquished, one of the Emperor's warlords, Grand Admiral Thrawn, has emerged from the backwaters of the Unknown Regions. With his sharp intellect and finely-honed tactical acumen, Thrawn has united what remains of the Imperial armed forces and is beginning a campaign that, if successful, will bring the New Republic to its knees. Assisted by a race of warriors known as the Noghri and reluctantly allied with an unstable Jedi Master named Joru'us C'baoth, Thrawn has discovered some of Emperor Palpatine's treasures on a remote world...treasures that willl be the key to the Empire's ultimate victory.... Dark Force Rising: Even though Thrawn suffered a partial reversal of fortunes at the Battle of Sluis Van, his campaign against the New Republic continues. With the intensifying political infighting in the New Republic's Provisional Council and the scheming of Bothan leader Borsk Fey'lya against Admiral Ackbar, the central government is shakier than ever. Meanwhile, Luke Skywalker is trying to discover the whereabouts of Jorus C'baoth, a Jedi Master who disappeared several years before the Clone Wars and is now rumored to be alive and well on the planet Jomark. As the Republic's only Jedi Knight, Luke needs any help he can get if he is to re-establish the new Jedi Order, starting with his sister Leia and her soon-to-be-born twins Jacen and Jaina. At the same time, Luke is trying to establish an alliance of sorts with Mara Jade, the smuggler Talon Karrde's ablest aide and, before Endor, one of the Emperor's most trusted operatives. Mara blames Luke for the loss of her former life and wanted to kill him, but recent events have forced her to team up with the Jedi Knight on several occasions. And now that the Empire seems to be rising again, Mara has to wrestle with her allegiances: Will she remain loyal to Karrde and his "non-aligned" smugglers? Will she eventually become friends with Luke and the New Republic? Or will she return to the Empire, now a shadow of the regime she once served? Meanwhile, C'baoth continues to aid Thrawn in his campaign against the New Republic, but his thirst for power and his insistence that Skywalker and his Force-sensitive family members be brought to him are putting the insane Jedi Master at odds with the Grand Admiral. In the second act of the Thrawn Trilogy, a race against time develops as Leia Organa Solo attempts to gain the trust of an alien species now totally devoted to the Empire, while her brother, husband and friends try to figure out who is leading the Empire....and what his ultimate plans are. The Last Command: Using the various items he has found on the Emperor's "treasure world" of Wayland, Thrawn continues his brilliant campaign against the still-unstable New Republic. With a newly-increased Imperial starfleet and a growing army of stormtroopers, Thrawn has begun to regain some of the Empire's lost territories, either by direct invasion or as a result of planetary governments switching sides to avoid the ravages of war on their worlds. Now, the New Republic's seat of government, located on the city-planet Coruscant, is itself vulnerable to Thrawn's seemingly unstoppable onslaught. But even as the galaxy begins to wonder if Thrawn is the true heir to the Empire, there are signs that the Grand Admiral's plans might be yet undone. C'baoth, that mysterious Jedi Master who has emerged from seemingly nowhere, is now on a dark side-fueled power trip and becoming more a hindrance to Thrawn's plans than an asset. Already unstable and mercurial, C'baoth has a disturbing appetite for controlling others and bending their minds to match his ideas of how the galaxy should be run. On another front, Leia Organa Solo has been able to use her influence over the Noghri to get the warrior race from under the control of the Empire and to help the New Republic. Meanwhile, Mara Jade has finally decided where her true loyalties lie, even though she's stilll tormented by Emperor Palpatine's last command: You will kill Luke Skywalker! My Viewpoint: As any reader of Dark Horse Comics' Star Wars graphic novels will tell you, the omnibus edition contains the full content of the 17 issues of Mike Baron's once-separate adaptations, with perhaps a few cosmetic changes done for the hardcover version. Because I have Tom Veitch's Dark Empire and Dark Empire II collections, I suspected that each of the three parts would not have the cover art reproduced to provide "chapter breaks" but would be included in "cover art galleries" at the end of the book. To my surprise, I was wrong; each of the adaptations is accompanied by a "title page" with a reproduction of one cover. I recognized Matthieu Lauffray's artwork for Issue 1 of Heir to the Empire, and the same artist's cover for Dark Force Rising serves as the book's dust jacket illustration. Lauffray's cover art for The Last Command is the most perplexing; it's nice but it includes Ben Kenobi, who only made one cameo appearance in Heir. Baron did a terrific job at adapting Zahn's novels; he was careful not to stray too far from the source books' cadence and themes, though of course he had to trim the fat and condense some of the various storylines. The dialogue is pretty consistent with Zahn's writing style, so if you've read the novels you are not likely to be disappointed. The graphic novels' artwork is visually striking and quite nice to behold, especially on the glossy paper used for this hardcover edition. However, if you are one of those readers who likes a certain unity in artistic style, you might be somewhat thrown for a loop because the three teams of artists (Fred Blanchard and Olivier Vatine for Heir, Terry Dodson and Kevin Nowlan for Dark Force and Edvin Biukovic and Eric Shanower for Last Command) all have very different styles. A case in point: Where Heir to the Empire tends to be somewhat more stylized and a bit abstract (think of the way Star Wars: The Clone Wars looks in comparison to the live-action Prequels), Dark Force Rising tends to look a bit more traditional and true to life. Dodson and Nowlan make Luke look like Mark Hamill, Han and Leia resemble Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher, and the characters from the books look "normal" and not distorted or exaggerated. Once you get used to the distinct styles, however, you get sucked into the story in the same way Lucas' first trilogy or Zahn's novels did when they first came out. Baron and the artists clearly loved the original Trilogy and Zahn's stories and characters, and this shows through the pacing of the adaptation and the detailing of the artwork.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Quinlan

    Wow so this is really an epic undertaking and an important piece of Star Wars history. I think your enjoyment will revolve around what your expectations are going in. Unfortunately I can't say that The Thrawn Trilogy really works as an adaptation. I haven't read the novels but a lot of these comics feel like they're trying to rush through way too much plot in too short of time span. Grand Admiral Thrawn is an excellent villain and expert tactician but his strategies are largely undermined by his Wow so this is really an epic undertaking and an important piece of Star Wars history. I think your enjoyment will revolve around what your expectations are going in. Unfortunately I can't say that The Thrawn Trilogy really works as an adaptation. I haven't read the novels but a lot of these comics feel like they're trying to rush through way too much plot in too short of time span. Grand Admiral Thrawn is an excellent villain and expert tactician but his strategies are largely undermined by his constant losses against the Rebellion. Some of the sideplots involving new roguish characters don't really seem to go anywhere. The introduction of Luke's romantic interest Mara Jade is neat and she is intriguing character but their relationship barely gets even started after 400 pages. Still, there is some great characterization of Original Trilogy characters in here and a lot of good to be had in the aftermath of Return of the Jedi. All this being said, I felt like the entire story did come to a satisfying conclusion and I think would have really exciting to read back before we had so much other Star Wars content to choose from.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Was feeling nostalgic for some "non-canon" and certainly non-Lucas, non-Disney Star Wars. Good story with the original characters and interesting villains. Nice to experience some Star Wars that isn't catering to children, the sale of action figures & video game sales, or trying to be like the original Star Wars rebooted. Two things bothered me though. 1) Weird writing style quirk that happens throughout. When one character is thinking about another character, the author often writes "the other" i Was feeling nostalgic for some "non-canon" and certainly non-Lucas, non-Disney Star Wars. Good story with the original characters and interesting villains. Nice to experience some Star Wars that isn't catering to children, the sale of action figures & video game sales, or trying to be like the original Star Wars rebooted. Two things bothered me though. 1) Weird writing style quirk that happens throughout. When one character is thinking about another character, the author often writes "the other" instead of "he" or "she". Like "Luke knew he and Leia both liked Tombstone pizza, but the other wouldn't admit it". 2) Too many references to something that happened in the original movies. Every character seems to have recollections about something. "[This situation] reminded [character] of that time [when we did that thing in the movie you saw]". Yeah, we get it. Also on the fence as to whether characters saying things they said in the movies felt like catchphrases and forced, or if it would be natural for them.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Casey Taylor

    Don't mistake my three-star rating for this graphic novel collection as an evaluation for Timothy Zahn's original trilogy. I don't think his trilogy was the five-star perfection some old fans do, but it was pretty creative and a solid story. Honestly, if you just read these graphic novels without having ever read the print books, you'd probably be fairly confused. This was not a great adaptation from the storytelling point of view, but I loved the art in volumes one and two and tolerated it in v Don't mistake my three-star rating for this graphic novel collection as an evaluation for Timothy Zahn's original trilogy. I don't think his trilogy was the five-star perfection some old fans do, but it was pretty creative and a solid story. Honestly, if you just read these graphic novels without having ever read the print books, you'd probably be fairly confused. This was not a great adaptation from the storytelling point of view, but I loved the art in volumes one and two and tolerated it in volume three. There's a lot of nostalgia wrapped up in these graphic novels for me. Not perfect but still fun.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gadi Zaig

    Great adaptation of Timothy Zahn’s masterpiece of a book trilogy. It provides great visual context for those who find it difficult to visualize the different settings and characters of the books. I will say I found it a little distracting that the art styles between parts of the graphic novel to be a bit distracting. I would say that the art style for the “Dark Force Rising” adaptation part was the best. I also noticed the graphic novel skipping a few scenes that are present in the books. But over Great adaptation of Timothy Zahn’s masterpiece of a book trilogy. It provides great visual context for those who find it difficult to visualize the different settings and characters of the books. I will say I found it a little distracting that the art styles between parts of the graphic novel to be a bit distracting. I would say that the art style for the “Dark Force Rising” adaptation part was the best. I also noticed the graphic novel skipping a few scenes that are present in the books. But overall, thoroughly enjoyed. I would read the original books first before starting the graphic novel. Score: 4/5 stars

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tres Herndon

    Been 25+ years since I read the trilogy and, quite frankly, I didn't remember much. Therefore most of this book was new to me. I liked how each third of the book had a different art style, which kept things interesting. The story is fairly complex so it was sometimes hard to follow in comic form, which is why I dinged it a star. Still, it's justified that the Thrawn trilogy is beloved even now that it's no longer canon. After all, Thrawn is such a great character he showed up in Star Wars: Rebel Been 25+ years since I read the trilogy and, quite frankly, I didn't remember much. Therefore most of this book was new to me. I liked how each third of the book had a different art style, which kept things interesting. The story is fairly complex so it was sometimes hard to follow in comic form, which is why I dinged it a star. Still, it's justified that the Thrawn trilogy is beloved even now that it's no longer canon. After all, Thrawn is such a great character he showed up in Star Wars: Rebels (canon). Maybe he'll finally make it to the big screen one day.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    Where the 2017 Thrawn novel is his origin story, this graphic novel version of the original 1990s novels is Grand Admiral Thrawn at the peak of his career. The story actually centers on Luke and Leia, with Thrawn lurking as a near omniscient arch villain. Leia is pregnant with twins, the Emperor is dead, and the Empire and the Rebellion are still duking it out for control of a galaxy far, far away. I read this on Kindle, which isn't my favorite format for graphic novels. That probably affected m Where the 2017 Thrawn novel is his origin story, this graphic novel version of the original 1990s novels is Grand Admiral Thrawn at the peak of his career. The story actually centers on Luke and Leia, with Thrawn lurking as a near omniscient arch villain. Leia is pregnant with twins, the Emperor is dead, and the Empire and the Rebellion are still duking it out for control of a galaxy far, far away. I read this on Kindle, which isn't my favorite format for graphic novels. That probably affected my rating, given the love for this series I've seen from friends.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    This is a really rather well done comic adaptation of the novels! I first read the novels about 10 years ago, and while I really enjoyed them then, I think I enjoyed it more with this comic version. I definitely read them faster this way. I'm thinking I'll read some more Star Wars comics! Can anybody suggest some they particularly enjoy? This is a really rather well done comic adaptation of the novels! I first read the novels about 10 years ago, and while I really enjoyed them then, I think I enjoyed it more with this comic version. I definitely read them faster this way. I'm thinking I'll read some more Star Wars comics! Can anybody suggest some they particularly enjoy?

  23. 4 out of 5

    Astaldo

    I would give 4 stars to the novel version of the "Thrawn Triology". The graphic novels however have some problems, mainly the story seems a bit rushed and becomes difficult to follow, hence the 2 stars. I would give 4 stars to the novel version of the "Thrawn Triology". The graphic novels however have some problems, mainly the story seems a bit rushed and becomes difficult to follow, hence the 2 stars.

  24. 5 out of 5

    DAVID J KO

    Highly Recommended The story had intriguing elements, but was rather confusing to follow. Also, we see too many bounty hunter betrayals that seem to be the mark of many thin Star Wars plot lines.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Umur

    This was gooood. I knew the books were good and they did a good job transforming it into comics. It's well written (obviously) and reads easily. The scenes, characters are quite like I imagined and it was easy to follow - sometimes SW comics have too much going on. I recommend to everyone. This was gooood. I knew the books were good and they did a good job transforming it into comics. It's well written (obviously) and reads easily. The scenes, characters are quite like I imagined and it was easy to follow - sometimes SW comics have too much going on. I recommend to everyone.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Audrey Hacker

    majority of star war fans: the thrawn trilogy is so good ! Best legends book/arc! me: uhhhhhhhhhhHHHHHHHHHHHHH

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Newton

    Excellent trilogy of books.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ram P. Sathi

    Just newly into the Star Wars canon, this was a great introduction beyond just the movies. Excited and eager to find the next book to be read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Samy

    This is the graphic novel, not the original novels (which were great). Competent adaptation, although it feels quite rushed. Three different artists, the first is a nice style but faces are barely distinguishable, the last is probably the best suited.

  30. 4 out of 5

    William Robb

    Great read for any Star Wars fan. Zahn should help write a movie!

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