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Novos Titãs: O Contrato de Judas

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De todos os trabalhos de Wolfman e Pérez, aquele que, indubitavelmente, mais se destacou foi a série O Contrato de Judas. Nesta espetacular saga, os Titãs são traídos por um de seus próprios membros e, depois, entregues nas mãos de seus piores inimigos. Trata-se de uma história de traição e morte que mudou radicalmente o destino da equipe.


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De todos os trabalhos de Wolfman e Pérez, aquele que, indubitavelmente, mais se destacou foi a série O Contrato de Judas. Nesta espetacular saga, os Titãs são traídos por um de seus próprios membros e, depois, entregues nas mãos de seus piores inimigos. Trata-se de uma história de traição e morte que mudou radicalmente o destino da equipe.

30 review for Novos Titãs: O Contrato de Judas

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Hired by an evil cabal called HIVE, Deathstroke the Terminator takes out the Teen Titans with thanks to a Judas within the ranks – but who sold them out and why? The Judas Contract is another “classic” story so-called because of middle-aged fanboys looking back at this early ‘80s comic through a nostalgia filter rather than it being of high quality. Even though this is a 33 year-old comic, I guess SPOILERS AHEAD, but the long and short of it is to never read any comics written by Marv Wolfman! It Hired by an evil cabal called HIVE, Deathstroke the Terminator takes out the Teen Titans with thanks to a Judas within the ranks – but who sold them out and why? The Judas Contract is another “classic” story so-called because of middle-aged fanboys looking back at this early ‘80s comic through a nostalgia filter rather than it being of high quality. Even though this is a 33 year-old comic, I guess SPOILERS AHEAD, but the long and short of it is to never read any comics written by Marv Wolfman! It’s not difficult to figure out who the “Judas” in the group is given that the Teen Titans are utter shits to 16 year old Terra/Tara for no reason. That’s literally the entire opening issue, by the way: the everyday lives of the annoying and mega-boring Teen Titans who inexplicably come down hard on this kid. Immediately you hate these characters and they’re supposed the heroes! And Marv Wolfman’s banter – pee-yew! Wonder Girl’s nickname is “Wondy”! Kee-rist, it’s such forced, unconvincing camaraderie – at best it’s cringey! Deathstroke taking out the Titans was duller than dull – it didn’t help that it was told in disjointed flashback so there was zero tension. If you want to see what an awesome Deathstroke fight sequence looks like, check out Identity Crisis – it’s literally the only good part of that otherwise trashy book. Deathstroke’s Vietnam origin was equally uninspired – Marvel did it better with The Punisher. The motivations behind the story are absolute garbage. HIVE are generically evil – they want the Titans’ powers or something idiotic for reasons – and are just there to fulfil the role of arbitrary antagonist. Terra’s motivations? Even worse. “Why not?” she simply says, suddenly smoking a cigarette – because smoking is BAD and only baddies smoke! She’s so laughably bad at being a bad girl. The other reason given is that Terra is crazy. She’s been hooking up with Deathstroke – a guy old enough to be her grandfather – but having a thing for older dudes doesn’t make her nuts (also, considering she’s meant to be 16, that makes Slade guilty of statutory rape – but then he already is the villain so I guess it’s expected behaviour). Wolfman is such a shitty writer. The only notable aspect of the book is that this is the first time Dick Grayson becomes Nightwing. He handily thought bubbles a rambling piece of exposition for the reader’s benefit, explaining his choice of name (it’s Kryptonian based) before slipping into his gay disco outfit. Wow, so worth it. Not at all stupid or contrived! And speaking of gay, I’m pretty sure it’s implied that Deathstroke and his war buddy Wintergreen enjoy getting their ‘stroke on together, ifyaknowwhaddamean! Don’t know why Wolfman threw that in there but then I’m not sure this dude knew what he was doing at any point of writing this rubbish! Like many ‘80s superhero books, The Judas Contract is overwritten, slow-moving, extremely dull, and hasn’t aged well at all. The characterisation and dialogue is corny and the plot is dumb and nonsensical. I mean, if you can put down a book three pages before the end and finish it a few days later, you haven’t written a gripping story! And this is what passes as a Teen Titans classic, one of their best storylines? Then I don’t think a good Teen Titans book exists. Every Teen Titan book I’ve read has been awful. This team SUCKS! And so does The Judas Contract – don’t bother.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    Second Read: Rereading this again after having actually read what came before made such a difference! It helped deepen my understanding of the emotional context. What I really enjoyed about this story was the build up. The conclusion didn’t feel like it under-delivered because Tara did betray the Titans, they were all hurt and confused. And the many mentions to her being unstable paid off in a very dramatic and intense way. Another reason why I liked this story was the introduction to Dick’s oth Second Read: Rereading this again after having actually read what came before made such a difference! It helped deepen my understanding of the emotional context. What I really enjoyed about this story was the build up. The conclusion didn’t feel like it under-delivered because Tara did betray the Titans, they were all hurt and confused. And the many mentions to her being unstable paid off in a very dramatic and intense way. Another reason why I liked this story was the introduction to Dick’s other famous alter-ego, Nightwing! Easily one of my favourite comic characters. I can’t wait to reread his stories. I love when a story can delve deeper into not only the protagonist but also the antagonist. Unfortunately, Tara gets short-changed in that department but there is an entire issue dedicated to Deathstroke aka Slade Wilson’s origins. The one thing I really dislike about this story was the way Tara’s rage and hate was described at the end. She kept going on about not needing a reason to destroy and that no one taught her to hate. My issue is that no one is born to hate. Yes, Tara was mentally-ill but there must have been a reason she fixated so much hate for heroes. I would’ve liked the story to explore that a little more. Other than that, I felt this story was pretty well done. You can see why it’s become one of the more famous Teen Titans stories. First Read: I read this comic to see the first time Dick Grayson becomes Nightwing,and we see that but it isn't as focused on Dick as I thought it would be. For each part there was a new revelation about Deathstroke the Terminator (or just Terminator as they called him). It was interesting to see his origin and to see why he was doing the things that he was doing. Also it was interesting to see the Titans, working and fighting together. I was slightly confused in the beginning but things started to make more sense once I got really into the story. Overall, it was a good Teen Titan comic, that made me learn a little more about certain characters I thought I knew enough about.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Storyline: 3 Artworks: 5 "The Judas Contract" is a cheesy DC comics milestone (Dick Grayson quit being Robin and becomes Nightwing; Deathstroke's secret origin is revealed for first time) but it not aged much well (Starfire's haircut and her "Dick! I love Dick!" double entendres... Oh good grief). But is always a pleasure to see George Perez's awesome hyperdetailed artworks. Shame on me for reading baloons imagining the voices from the "Teen Titans Go" TV show characters XD Storyline: 3 Artworks: 5 "The Judas Contract" is a cheesy DC comics milestone (Dick Grayson quit being Robin and becomes Nightwing; Deathstroke's secret origin is revealed for first time) but it not aged much well (Starfire's haircut and her "Dick! I love Dick!" double entendres... Oh good grief). But is always a pleasure to see George Perez's awesome hyperdetailed artworks. Shame on me for reading baloons imagining the voices from the "Teen Titans Go" TV show characters XD

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    This is probably not the most substantive insight into a book, but I'm going to say that if you're the spokesperson for an evil cult that is trying to pass itself off as a humane religion, you may want to go by a name other than Mistress Mayhem. This is probably not the most substantive insight into a book, but I'm going to say that if you're the spokesperson for an evil cult that is trying to pass itself off as a humane religion, you may want to go by a name other than Mistress Mayhem.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Are you unfamiliar with the Teen Titans? These young heroes have been dealing out justice in the shadow of the Justice League all their life. Their camaraderie is iconic and their passion, unquenchable. Being young and inexperienced, their development has always been impregnated by a touch of innocence and a whole lot of trial and error. With members like Robin, Starfire, Beast Boy, Cyborg and Raven, the Teen Titans have been a peculiar group of You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Are you unfamiliar with the Teen Titans? These young heroes have been dealing out justice in the shadow of the Justice League all their life. Their camaraderie is iconic and their passion, unquenchable. Being young and inexperienced, their development has always been impregnated by a touch of innocence and a whole lot of trial and error. With members like Robin, Starfire, Beast Boy, Cyborg and Raven, the Teen Titans have been a peculiar group of heroes with their own set of flaws, but also a powerful team that finds their footing thanks to their unparalleled friendship. But what exactly is The Judas Contract about? This is the ultimate and quintessential Teen Titans story about new beginnings and betrayals. Collecting The New Teen Titans #39-40, Tales of the Teen Titans #41-44 and Tales of the Teen Titans Annual #3, this story features the origin story for both Nightwing and Deathstroke, the introduction of Jericho and Tara Markov, as well as the retirement of Kid Flash. However, it is the betrayal of a Teen Titan that highlights this story arc and identifies it as a classic canon DC story worth visiting as the events that unfold will shock the Titans to the core and bring them to experience something that they are likely to not forget anytime soon. What readers need to keep in mind while picking up this story arc is that it was created in the 1980s. There are plenty of implications in that fact alone and one of them is that it struggles to survive the test of time. The artwork alone is an indisputable indicator of the era in which it was all thought up, but it is far from being a flaw in this case. The style portrays colourful and detailed looks at some of our heroes original designs and begins to focus a lot more on facial expressions and movement to convey the drama in constrast to the previous era’s art style. The artwork also conforms itself to the traditional panel structure and makes it easy to observe how extremely dialogue-heavy the story is. In fact, it’s safe to say that Marv Wolfman was very fond of the telling-rather-than-showing style, but what made it much more difficult to read was all the internal monologue that were impossible to believe. As much as I wanted to believe that those were the words they uttered to themselves in the mist of danger and what not, I was too baffled by how much cringe it instigated in me to overlook it. It still remained that it was fun discovering the personality of all these Titans through the eyes of Marv Wolfman. They all had their own stories to tell, and some were even carrying over emotions from past events. What however struck me the hardest was the sexual touch that was lingering throughout the banter in this story arc. Some of these characters are teenagers, yet they make jokes that seemed a little bit too exuberant and spicy. Although Starfire has always been portrayed as a beautiful innocent orange-skinned alien, and I expected to see that being focused on here and there, the rest sort of came out of the blue. While the plot revolves around a major betrayal that could potentially lead the Teen Titans to their demise, the execution took away a lot of the tension and suspense that you would expect from it all. In fact, there are no surprises in this volume. Everything is pretty predictable. This forces you to seek enjoyment and appreciation elsewhere, leaving you feeling a bit underwhelmed. Ultimately, The New Teen Titans: The Judas Contract is a story to pick up to enlighten your knowledge on an iconic event, but it is far from being the most impressive story to grace the DC universe. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alger

    To me what made this book fantastic was the edge it brought. Comics have always born the stigma of being for children and having very simplistic writing style that only made them fit for younger readers. This book becomes a paradox. It was about the junior members of the DC universe, too young for the Justice League which was populated by the greats: Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Flash, et. al, however Teen Titans was more mature than the titles bearing those more senior members of the Lea To me what made this book fantastic was the edge it brought. Comics have always born the stigma of being for children and having very simplistic writing style that only made them fit for younger readers. This book becomes a paradox. It was about the junior members of the DC universe, too young for the Justice League which was populated by the greats: Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Flash, et. al, however Teen Titans was more mature than the titles bearing those more senior members of the League. It was violent. It was very sexual. It was also more sophisticated. This title was what made DC a rival for Marvel. In this we are shown a very fragile union of Teenagers with all the angst, ego, and problems of normal teens juxtoposed against the duties of saving the world and presenting a good image to the world. As can be expected there is a great deal of strain, and then along comes a spider. A traitor infiltrates their ranks and uses all of these issues to effectively destroy them from within. What will happen? How can total annihilation be averted? Read on and see . . .

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    I read this the other day because I wanted to watch the DC Animated movie of the same name and I wanted to reconnect with this older story of the Teen Titans. I gotta say, this was just as good now as it was back in the day. Deathstroke is still the hardline, tortured and reluctant bad guy, but there is so much more depth to him other than being a villain. He is portrayed in many ways these days and soon to be in the next Justice League movie. In this it goes into much about him, including his h I read this the other day because I wanted to watch the DC Animated movie of the same name and I wanted to reconnect with this older story of the Teen Titans. I gotta say, this was just as good now as it was back in the day. Deathstroke is still the hardline, tortured and reluctant bad guy, but there is so much more depth to him other than being a villain. He is portrayed in many ways these days and soon to be in the next Justice League movie. In this it goes into much about him, including his history and the family you would never think he would have. He loses a son in this story and that turns his heart to ice. The last thing you want is a super soldier that can outfight and out think you, as your enemy. He conducts a plot and with the inclusion of the church of Brother Blood and those crazy zealots, he turns the Titans against one another. This is old school Marv Wolfman writing, and George Perez art and it can't get much better than this. Marv is a master storyteller and I have actually met him. He still has never considered Deathstroke the Terminator a villain. He believes him to be a good man with morals and standards, forced to do things that spiral out of control because of his sense of duty and his powerful belief in doing what you commit to, never deviating, never lying or betraying, and removing obstacles in your path, no matter the cost. The mission is what is important. This is a great story and will remain timeless in my eyes. Just good storytelling, plain and simple. Danny

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

    (From the notes I wrote in 2005.) After reading this, a lot of things are clearer about the Teen Titans cartoon. I love Starfire's giant 80s hair and Wonder Girl's costume. Very interesting storyline, but I prefer Marvel over DC for many reasons. (The planning, quality of writing, fight scenes, and artwork and fluidity.) However, it was still cool reading about these characters that I had come to like so much and learning about their background. (From the notes I wrote in 2005.) After reading this, a lot of things are clearer about the Teen Titans cartoon. I love Starfire's giant 80s hair and Wonder Girl's costume. Very interesting storyline, but I prefer Marvel over DC for many reasons. (The planning, quality of writing, fight scenes, and artwork and fluidity.) However, it was still cool reading about these characters that I had come to like so much and learning about their background.

  9. 4 out of 5

    James Rodrigues

    My knowledge of this storyline initially came from it being adapted for season 2 of the animated Teen Titans series. Reading the actual source material was an interesting experience, and the result was a well crafted tale which may have a few problems (Dicks costume change prevents him from helping the Titans?). However, the deceptive tale of Terra and The Terminators take down of the Titans is a fantastic read, with a standout character in the mute Jericho.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    3.5, rounded up. This series was on the same level as X-Men in the early 80s, in both popularity and quality. I was always a True Believer, so this, as with many titles from the Distinguished Competition, flew under my radar. I have been trying to fill those gaps, and DC joining Comixology Unlimited has been a boon. The title gives the game away here: One of the Titans is a traitor! Well, a spy; their loyalties were never with the group at all. The identity of the bad apple is never in question, o 3.5, rounded up. This series was on the same level as X-Men in the early 80s, in both popularity and quality. I was always a True Believer, so this, as with many titles from the Distinguished Competition, flew under my radar. I have been trying to fill those gaps, and DC joining Comixology Unlimited has been a boon. The title gives the game away here: One of the Titans is a traitor! Well, a spy; their loyalties were never with the group at all. The identity of the bad apple is never in question, only whether they will see the light in time. Look, this is vintage tights-book silliness. The art is mostly great, but when it isn't... Same goes for the writing (Deathstroke's dialogue is especially inconsistent), but it is a lot of fun. Plus, Robin finally becomes Nightwing! That legitimately important moment falls a bit flat, sadly, but this is a good book for any who want some old-school superheroics, bad puns, gaudy tights, and all.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bryen

    Not only was this the best Teen Titans story I have read, It's the best DC comic I have read to date! This is the first graphic novel that has actually put me in tears at the end. While it provided an interesting backstory for Deathstroke, it also saw the retirement of Kid Flash, Dick Grayson's exit as Robin and entrance as Nightwing, along with introducing Jericho, along with the death of one of their own. The emotional betrayal is simply heartbreakingly powerful. It was malicious, cruel and he Not only was this the best Teen Titans story I have read, It's the best DC comic I have read to date! This is the first graphic novel that has actually put me in tears at the end. While it provided an interesting backstory for Deathstroke, it also saw the retirement of Kid Flash, Dick Grayson's exit as Robin and entrance as Nightwing, along with introducing Jericho, along with the death of one of their own. The emotional betrayal is simply heartbreakingly powerful. It was malicious, cruel and heart-wrenching. It also showcases what an amazing Team the Teen Titans are and how desperately loyal they are to each other. I would highly recommend this story and then watch the animated movie.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jason Thayer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In the 1980's DC"s Teen Titans was in an intense rivalry with Marvel's X-men, and many actually thought the Titans's new Teen line-up was a rip off the X-men, despite the fact that the Titans came first. The Judas Contract is a benchmark story. It focuses on Terra, the sister of Geo-Force, a member of the superhero team The Outsiders (at the time led by Batman), who has just joined the Titans. Like her brother, Terra posseses the ability to bend the Earth itself to her whim. The Titans feel she In the 1980's DC"s Teen Titans was in an intense rivalry with Marvel's X-men, and many actually thought the Titans's new Teen line-up was a rip off the X-men, despite the fact that the Titans came first. The Judas Contract is a benchmark story. It focuses on Terra, the sister of Geo-Force, a member of the superhero team The Outsiders (at the time led by Batman), who has just joined the Titans. Like her brother, Terra posseses the ability to bend the Earth itself to her whim. The Titans feel she will be a great asset, but they do not realize she is a loose cannon. However, Beast Boy feels they can rein her in. What they don't realize is that a mole is in the works. Deathstroke has sent in an enemy agent. What's more, the Titans have also acquired a member named Jericho, who can possess people's bodies. But who is this Jericho? Can either of them be trusted? Some great artwork from George Perez as always. And a story that actually is quite different from the animated series from a few years back. If all you know is the Cartoon Network show, you know nothing about the real team. And this is not the stupid Teen Titans Go version either. Wolfman and Perez are a great team here and if you like the Titans, this is a good story to start with. It's classic 80's comics at its best.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Seth Heasley

    This is the arc of the Teen Titans I read and re-read as a kid. Deathstroke is easily my favorite DC villian, so much that I completely geeked out when Slade Wilson was introduced on the first season of Arrow. And here you get his origin story (which of course differs from Arrow's). It's the classic lineup of the Titans, with Robin, Wonder Girl, Starfire, Changeling, Raven, and Cyborg. I miss Kid Flash here, because by this time he was The Flash (I think), but it's still cool to see Robin transfo This is the arc of the Teen Titans I read and re-read as a kid. Deathstroke is easily my favorite DC villian, so much that I completely geeked out when Slade Wilson was introduced on the first season of Arrow. And here you get his origin story (which of course differs from Arrow's). It's the classic lineup of the Titans, with Robin, Wonder Girl, Starfire, Changeling, Raven, and Cyborg. I miss Kid Flash here, because by this time he was The Flash (I think), but it's still cool to see Robin transform into Nightwing, and reading this now, I'd love to see Jericho make an appearance on Arrow or Flash. (They've already done a version of Ravager, so why not?)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    With a captivating storyline and beautiful artwork, The Judas Contract is a near perfect addition to the Teen Titans mythos. The only drawback being the dated dialogues. There's so much going on this book, the infiltration of teen titans, the origin of Deathstroke, the first appearance of Nightwing, the introduction of Jericho..and yet everything's been contructed so well. The book not only explores the heroes but also the antagonists of the arc. Deathstroke has always been an interesting charac With a captivating storyline and beautiful artwork, The Judas Contract is a near perfect addition to the Teen Titans mythos. The only drawback being the dated dialogues. There's so much going on this book, the infiltration of teen titans, the origin of Deathstroke, the first appearance of Nightwing, the introduction of Jericho..and yet everything's been contructed so well. The book not only explores the heroes but also the antagonists of the arc. Deathstroke has always been an interesting character, and this storyline provided great depth to his character. Overall, it was a very enjoyable read and recommended to every Teen Titans fans.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Routh

    AKA the inspiration for season 2 of Teen Titans, which is why I wanted to read this compilation. I'm not going to lie: it was a bit lackluster for what I was expecting (and that "witty" dialogue--I guess I should cut some slack for the '80s?), and the pacing felt really weird (see: Logan and Terra's sudden romance). Still, I really enjoyed it, and as someone who is far more versed in cartoons than comics, it was really interesting to see the story in comic format and also get the backstories for AKA the inspiration for season 2 of Teen Titans, which is why I wanted to read this compilation. I'm not going to lie: it was a bit lackluster for what I was expecting (and that "witty" dialogue--I guess I should cut some slack for the '80s?), and the pacing felt really weird (see: Logan and Terra's sudden romance). Still, I really enjoyed it, and as someone who is far more versed in cartoons than comics, it was really interesting to see the story in comic format and also get the backstories for several characters. Plus, Deathstroke. Who doesn't love Deathstroke? "Vainglorious fool" is my new go-to insult.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    I’m giving this four stars more for its importance as a story than my actual enjoyment of it. The ending was strong but much of what comes before is dull. It is interesting to see Grayson become Nightwing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tom Malinowski

    Terra makes her move against the Titans, and Dick's new identity is revealed as another person might join up. The ending is very fitting and appropriate. Wow! Terra makes her move against the Titans, and Dick's new identity is revealed as another person might join up. The ending is very fitting and appropriate. Wow!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    Back in 1985, when I was in sixth grade, there was this DC comics series called “Crisis on Infinite Earths” that I was obsessed about. It was a twelve-issue run, and I eagerly awaited every month for the new issue. On top of that, there were numerous cross-overs into other DC titles, which I had to buy. I still own these issues, wrapped in their mylar protective bags with cardboard backing, tucked away in a comic book box somewhere in my parents basement. I never paid much attention then as to wh Back in 1985, when I was in sixth grade, there was this DC comics series called “Crisis on Infinite Earths” that I was obsessed about. It was a twelve-issue run, and I eagerly awaited every month for the new issue. On top of that, there were numerous cross-overs into other DC titles, which I had to buy. I still own these issues, wrapped in their mylar protective bags with cardboard backing, tucked away in a comic book box somewhere in my parents basement. I never paid much attention then as to who the writers or artists were. I didn’t care. I was in sixth grade. I just loved reading comic books, seeing the Technicolor stories of spandex-clad superheroes beating the snot out of spandex-clad supervillains. I didn’t really pay attention to stuff like that until college, when my tastes moved away from “X-men” and “Batman” and more toward series like Neil Gaiman’s “Sandman” or Alan Moore’s “Watchmen”. Eventually, I lost interest in superheroes entirely. Not coincidentally, this started happening around the same time I realized that girls actually wanted to have sex with me. I’m 47 now, married, with a kid. I just recently started back up reading comic books, and I love them. I feel like I’ve been away from a group of friends for a really long time, but they don’t seem to mind, and they act like only a few days have passed. Even though, deep down, I know I’ve changed considerably. I brought up “Crisis on Infinite Earths” for several reasons, one being that it was written by Marv Wolfman and drawn by George Perez, the same team who created “The New Teen Titans”, a series that I just recently started reading for the first time because I missed out on it when it first ran, back in the early-‘80s. “Crisis” was also unique in that it was a series that brought about radical changes in the DC universe, good and bad. I’m not an expert in comic books, but I’m fairly certain that “Crisis” started a trend in the comic book world of universe-changing storylines that consolidated numerous titles. Marvel imitated DC’s “Crisis” in its 1992 series “The Infinity War”, the series that inspired the last two “Avengers” films. Life in the DC universe would never be the same after the events of “Crisis”. But it wasn’t the first time that DC ran a series that had life-altering consequences for its heroes. Wolfman and Perez, two years prior to “Crisis”, ran a series in its popular comic “The New Teen Titans” that was entitled “The Judas Contract”, which ran in issues 39-44, including Annual 3. It was such a popular storyline that DC fans still reverentially talk about it. It also helped to cement the importance of the “Teen Titans” within the DC universe. Several huge things happened within “The Judas Contract”. The most significant revelation was the end of Robin. No, Dick Grayson didn’t die. He just didn’t want to be the Boy Wonder anymore. It was in this series that fans were introduced to Grayson’s newest manifestation, Nightwing. This had huge ramifications for the DC universe, not the least of which was finding Robin’s successor. Another huge event was the introduction of a new hero named Jericho, whose origins were inextricably linked to the Titans’ biggest enemy, Deathstroke the Terminator. Of course, the hugest revelation in the series was the death of Terra, the newest member of the Teen Titans. Her death was shocking in that it is revealed (to the Titans at least, as readers were clued in several issues back) that Terra was actually working for Deathstroke as a spy bent on infiltrating the team in order to destroy it from within. She almost succeeds. Terra’s death was significant for the simple reason that the Titans would forever suffer from trust issues afterwards. It’s bad enough being a teen superhero, with all the trappings and problems that a normal teenager faces. Throw in the added problem of a developing friendship that turns out to be founded on lies and an inexplicable psychotic hatred, and you basically have a major traumatic mind-fuck that won’t ever be adequately assuaged. For readers, Terra’s death was even worse. It was a total subversion of normal comic book conventions. As Wolfman explained in his introduction to the book, “It was the first time a member of a super-hero group ever proved to be a spy (not a traitor---she was always working for the Terminator). Playing on the comic readers’ expectations worked. The Tara Markov story threw everyone for a loop.” Arguably, “The Judas Contract” was one of the first graphic novel series to really play around with comic book conventions and subvert traditional comic book sensibilities. Many more of these series would follow, all of them ultimately toying with the idea that, in the comic book universe that readers have come to rely on, nothing and nobody was safe anymore.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    Now being a comics noob, I knew a little about what this storyline had in store for me. Mostly revolving around Tara Markov's plot int his book. Thankfully, I didn't know much else. This story contained two other wonderful surprises for me including some great setup for Dick Grayson and a nice peek into Deathstroke's past. Yes, by today's standards the art might seem dated, but a solid storyline held this together. My only regret is that I wish the arc had been longer than only four issues! High Now being a comics noob, I knew a little about what this storyline had in store for me. Mostly revolving around Tara Markov's plot int his book. Thankfully, I didn't know much else. This story contained two other wonderful surprises for me including some great setup for Dick Grayson and a nice peek into Deathstroke's past. Yes, by today's standards the art might seem dated, but a solid storyline held this together. My only regret is that I wish the arc had been longer than only four issues! Highly recommend and serves as a nice piece to the DC timeline puzzle just prior to Crisis on Infinite Earths.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aurora

    Classic, many essential moments (the birth of Elvis Nightwing!), but not esp. modern or subtle. Very heavy handed, or sort of elegant in its emotional simplicity. I admire the refusal to provide satisfying reason for Terra's insane bitchery. Like, toward the end, characters are literally begging to know why she betrayed them, and the narrator steps in to tell you that there is no why. Girl is just batshit crazy. Classic, many essential moments (the birth of Elvis Nightwing!), but not esp. modern or subtle. Very heavy handed, or sort of elegant in its emotional simplicity. I admire the refusal to provide satisfying reason for Terra's insane bitchery. Like, toward the end, characters are literally begging to know why she betrayed them, and the narrator steps in to tell you that there is no why. Girl is just batshit crazy.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Victor Orozco

    Well, here it is. In its 192 page glory, New Teen Titans: The Judas Contract. I've seen the Cartoon Network Animated Series, particularly its second season which adapts this story. Plus I've also seen the newest DC Animated Movie. And I've got to say, I'm filled both with contentment but also a degree of disappointment. This collection begins with Marv Wolfman making it clear they were doing something unprecedented in comics by creating a character so young and promising - as a treacherous and wi Well, here it is. In its 192 page glory, New Teen Titans: The Judas Contract. I've seen the Cartoon Network Animated Series, particularly its second season which adapts this story. Plus I've also seen the newest DC Animated Movie. And I've got to say, I'm filled both with contentment but also a degree of disappointment. This collection begins with Marv Wolfman making it clear they were doing something unprecedented in comics by creating a character so young and promising - as a treacherous and wicked human being. Doing it as a counter to another comic book universe character of a sweet young girl who becomes a full-fledged hero. I'm not against this mind you, I just wish there was more backstory. I've read earlier work of Tara and her brother Brion Markov/Geo-Force, as well as the aforementioned media. I wanted to know why. Why is she bad? This was the biggest problem I had with this story. I think Teen Titans season 2 made it clear that she wasn't really evil but driven by fear, she had great power and didn't know how to use it. She lived in fear, living as a nomad with no family and no friends and just when it appeared that she had friends they learn the truth about her so she left. But someone found her and taught her how to live with her power. But that someone was the great enemy of the last people she met. She then showed gratitude to this evil man that was sculpting her to become like him. The movie was slightly similar, yet kept it brief and also made it clearer with flashbacks to her youth which involved Deathstroke saving her from a rabid group of bigots from Markovia that saw not a girl but a witch. Tara Markov was a powered being and reviled for it and treated like a monster. Treat one like a monster long enough and you eventually become a monster. Tara would be treated as a monster and the rest, as they say, is history. This collection begins with stuff before the actual Judas Contract story. The Teen Titans as the eight beloved heroes of Robin, Starfire, Cyborg, Beast Boy, Raven, Terra, Kid Flash, and Wonder Girl stopping bad guys, all the while Slade Wilson/Deathstroke prepares to take on the Teen Titans for their part in the death of his son Grant Wilson/Ravager. He does all this with his loyal spy Tara, dolled up for him as they train for their eventual attack. The end of Dick Grayson's Robin persona and Wally West's retirement of Kid Flash. An encounter with Brother Blood and his Brotherhood of Evil. By the way, nice title too - Judas Contract, in reference to Slade Wilson accepting a contract for the HIVE terrorist group but he needs an inside man, a spy to infiltrate the Teen Titans. Learn all their weaknesses and then strike. That spy is Tara Markov/Terra, a girl with the ability to manipulate soil, but that's not all she manipulates - people, that in itself may not be a superpower but its still pretty impressive. I got to say the writers really worked a terrible human being. But like I said, its hard to accept, especially without an explanation. Without a doubt, I share Beast Boy's feelings of hurt and nonacceptance. Sixteen years old! How can someone at that age just be evil? There has to be an explanation. It begins with the proverbial calm before the storm as the Titans get comfy and happy with the cool New York weather. Beast Boy and Terra kiss. Because you can't have a Judas without a kiss of death. Betrayal with a kiss, truly the worst thing to be done. Though it is nice that there is a moment where Raven and everybody else gets a glimpse at what she is hiding. Oh, and I have to write this - Is Marv Wolfman a pervert or something?! It implied that Terra and Deathstroke are more than just partners. She's a child and he's an old man! Marv Wolfman is a pretty good writer but I hear a lot about him being an egotistical pervert. I guess what they say about Donna and Terry are probably true too, but that's another story. Then the attacks start, Deathstroke seeks out Dick Grayson but fails, especially with help from a mysterious party, his ex-wife Adeline. But the other attacks upon Titans Starfire, Wonder Girl, Cyborg, Raven, and Beast Boy succeed. Dick then learns the truth about Deathstroke from Adeline and I have to say that this is probably the best part of the story. I have long heard about Deathstroke ever since I saw the tenth season of Smallville and of course caught glimpses of the CW series Arrow, and of course Teen Titans animated series. Not to mention a multitude of video games, animated movies and of course the newest DCEU Batman movie, which promises Deathstroke as the villain. His story is remarkable and yet tragic. He was a brave man but an experiment that was meant to improve him turned into something much more ferocious than an ordinary man should become. In many ways, it is like Marvel's Captain America. Only that was intended, this was not. Also, Slade Wilson probably was already a man with sociopathic tendencies. The procedure amplified what he already was. So a good man becomes great, a bad man becomes evil. He couldn't stop fighting even after his military service was done, a warrior through and through, he became the world's most wanted mercenary. Adeline rightly left this man as she took her son and spent years trying to put a stop to her husband. In this case, helping her son afflicted by her husband's genetic aberration in his DNA that made him Deathstroke caused Joseph Wilson to become a powerful telekinetic called Jericho. With Slade and Terra having made their move and Dick having survived, Adeline and her son offer their help to Dick Grayson who decides that the time is right to become a new type of hero. I like the fact that its through Superman that Dick remembers Krypton's glorious divinities that appealed to him. In particular the noble divinity of Nightwing. The rest is history as both Jericho and Nightwing seek out to save the Teen Titans. It is at HIVE headquarters that the final confrontation is set as the Titans face their doom. But thanks to Jericho, the Titans through some misunderstanding between Deathstroke and Terra cause chaos to reign as Terra in a fit of uncontrollable rage destroys everything in her path. Sort of ironic that it goes from one Bible story to another. The biblical champion of Samson dies bringing down his enemies lair upon them all is what comes to mind when I think of Terra in this case. I still can't accept Marv Wolfman's words. 16 and insane? Hate without reason, without cause, she hates with relish and glee? Reasons don't exist? I can't believe that. Without a doubt, there should have been a similar backstory written for Terra just as Deathstroke was given by his wife Adeline. But maybe that story has yet to be told. She deserved love, as everyone does. She deserved to live, as everyone does. Most of all, I think all of us deserve a reason as to why she became what she did. Because as she lived, she was loved by one to the very end in Beast Boy. Sometimes I really think he is my favorite Teen Titan. He may not be very intelligent and he's really goofy, but he has the greatest heart of the Teen Titans. Of course, he would give that heart to someone that needed love. Amazing story, though flawed. B

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was November's read for the library's Comic Book Club... and it garnered a lot of interesting discussion, especially about a character's various evolutions throughout his/her entire tenure (namely with Robin/Nightwing). This was a solid story that has rightly earned its place as a "must-read" arc for many reasons, but the mains ones are: (1) Because it's the first time we see Nightwing, and (2) Because it's the first time a character is a spy from the beginning. They don't turn traitor; the This was November's read for the library's Comic Book Club... and it garnered a lot of interesting discussion, especially about a character's various evolutions throughout his/her entire tenure (namely with Robin/Nightwing). This was a solid story that has rightly earned its place as a "must-read" arc for many reasons, but the mains ones are: (1) Because it's the first time we see Nightwing, and (2) Because it's the first time a character is a spy from the beginning. They don't turn traitor; they were just always on the side of darkness. That was a new idea when this was written, and an interesting look into the development of a villain: You have Terra, who is "evil because she's evil," and then you have Slade Wilson, who has a complex backstory that eventually led him to villainy. The two beside each other presented an interesting foil within antagonism. This comic arc also provides some interesting discussion to how characters change with different writers and with the times: Terra's character has been given more layers in other iterations, so it's interesting to look into why they made those adjustments. (Mostly, they made her more of a sympathetic character and Slade just "evil because he's evil." An interesting turn of the tables, to say the least.) This story definitely has a lot of fuel for literary analysis... though it's also worth noting that a big part of our discussion was about the '80s-ness of this graphic novel. Nightwing's costume was... hilarious. And Jericho's sideburns... oh my. This comic was a time capsule of why those fashion choices died.... It might not exactly be intellectual, but you just can't ignore those bold choices... and you also can't not chuckle. In short: This is a story that is safely ensconced in the history of comics for many reasons: from it's groundbreaking writing... to its "blast from the past" nostalgia. A must-read, plain and simple.

  23. 5 out of 5

    James Love

    Artwork: 5 Storyline: 5 This 1980's comic has outlasted the test of time. The artwork and storyline are better than the repetitive, Disney-esque drivel and pablum being excreted by the current titles. The team is evolving and going through both a regime and roster change. *SPOILERS* Kid Flash leaves the team too return to college. Robin leaves to find himself as a true hero, finally shrugging off the side-kick mantle completely. And returning to lead as Nightwing. Wonder Girl gets tapped to lead the t Artwork: 5 Storyline: 5 This 1980's comic has outlasted the test of time. The artwork and storyline are better than the repetitive, Disney-esque drivel and pablum being excreted by the current titles. The team is evolving and going through both a regime and roster change. *SPOILERS* Kid Flash leaves the team too return to college. Robin leaves to find himself as a true hero, finally shrugging off the side-kick mantle completely. And returning to lead as Nightwing. Wonder Girl gets tapped to lead the team and in the beginning shows how becoming a leader takes both time and tests to master that role. She learns that you can't be a leader just by being given a leadership position. Tara Markov aka Terra is a 180 degree different view of the young heroine Kitty Pryde of Marvel's X-Men. Tara has all the narcissistic tendencies of today's youth. She is constantly whining about the team not kissing her @$$ and letting her have her own way. She is also the reason I want to finish this graphic novel. There are points in the story, so far, that shows a hopeful ending of redemption for her. This hopefulness propels the reader along because it increases the suspense in expectation of her successfully destroying the team. Terra's first appearance was as a villain in the pages of TNTT #26 Jericho is the biggest challenge for a writer. The reason is the creator decided to make him mute... Even to the point of refusing to let the writers use the typical air balloons over the head filled with the character's thoughts. He is also the most liberating character for artists because they get to be the voice of the character by using his facial expressions and other visual effects to allow this character to communicate. Deathstroke does some of his best psychological warfare in this story arc. The whole Deathstroke vs. The New Teen Titans started way back in TNTT #2 with the death of his son. Brother Blood and Mother Mayhem (TNTT #21 & 22) show the inherent dangers of a charismatic leader, the Freedom of Religion (or lack of), and how it can be used to destroy a nation/state from the inside.

  24. 4 out of 5

    tony dillard jr

    With the animated version of the Judas Contract recently coming out on DVD, I wanted to read the original source material before I gave the film a view. I just happened to be sitting on a vintage copy of the complete story and so I gave it a read (Note: my review of The New Teen Titans: Terra Incognito comes before this volume.) The Titans have recently added a new member to their ranks for the first time since reforming. But it's their downfall, as newcomer Terra, is actually in league with th With the animated version of the Judas Contract recently coming out on DVD, I wanted to read the original source material before I gave the film a view. I just happened to be sitting on a vintage copy of the complete story and so I gave it a read (Note: my review of The New Teen Titans: Terra Incognito comes before this volume.) The Titans have recently added a new member to their ranks for the first time since reforming. But it's their downfall, as newcomer Terra, is actually in league with their arch-enemy, the deadly Deathstroke the Terminator. But before the teens can come to blows with the combined forces of Deathstroke, Terra, and HIVE, they must taken on the equally lethal Brother Blood who just happens to have brainwashed one of the Titans into becoming his newest follower. An exciting collection that introduces the character Jericho to the mix along with revealing Dick Grayson's metamorphosis from Robin into Nightwing, and the secret origin of Slade Wilson. Plus, more hints about the forthcoming Crisis on Infinite Earths are contained within. Masterful stories by Marv Wolfman with just as equally amazing artwork by George Perez. A true classic that is a must have for fans of Crisis, the Teen Titans, or just darn fine comic books.

  25. 4 out of 5

    JJ

    Even though I really like George Perez' art, it wasn't enough to save this graphic novel from a mediocre two-star rating. The majority of the page layouts were static, narrow rectangular panels with teeny-tiny figures in them. There were a few excellent splash pages, and there's a big battle at the end wherein the panels are a bit larger and the artwork more dynamic. The story itself is tedious. There's a full issue devoted to a flashback detailing Deadshot's origin story: that issue is pedestri Even though I really like George Perez' art, it wasn't enough to save this graphic novel from a mediocre two-star rating. The majority of the page layouts were static, narrow rectangular panels with teeny-tiny figures in them. There were a few excellent splash pages, and there's a big battle at the end wherein the panels are a bit larger and the artwork more dynamic. The story itself is tedious. There's a full issue devoted to a flashback detailing Deadshot's origin story: that issue is pedestrian, rote, and absolutely boring. There're a lot of talking heads throughout the book, and a lot of plodding dialogue. Marv Wolfman's attempts at writing what I suppose is meant to be Spidey-style banter is absolutely cringeworthy. Terra is pretty cool character, until her motivations are revealed, which are unsatisfying and, simply, dumb. This story gives us the origin of Nightwing, which is cool, but his origin is simply a lot of trite internal monologue on Dick Grayson's part. Jericho is a cool character with nifty powers. I really wanted to like this book (I certainly don't start a couple-hundred-page graphic novel not wanting to like it), but it's largely plodding and tedious. Not all 'classics' stand the test of time.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lestat

    Read this for a book club. Honestly, very little of the actual contract in here, most of it is backstory. The dialogue is terrible - it’s full of exposition and jokes when people are literally dying. Gar is the worst character ever - what a creepy chauvinistic jerk. Oh my gawd, he should have been in jail for all the sexual harassment. This is what passed for cool in the 80s? No wonder the world is so rotten now. I hare that Starfire is objectified by everything that walks, being her must have b Read this for a book club. Honestly, very little of the actual contract in here, most of it is backstory. The dialogue is terrible - it’s full of exposition and jokes when people are literally dying. Gar is the worst character ever - what a creepy chauvinistic jerk. Oh my gawd, he should have been in jail for all the sexual harassment. This is what passed for cool in the 80s? No wonder the world is so rotten now. I hare that Starfire is objectified by everything that walks, being her must have been an absolute pain. This storyline is iconic but how come no one called Slade for being a paedophile? Everyone keeps talking about how Terra was completely nuts, but hello, Slade took advantage of a little girl? This is the problem with popular media. It never looks at the bigger picture. Even in the 80s, I’m pretty sure people must have been uncomfortable with the way Terra is drawn to act like an adult woman.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zack Clopton

    Sort of fucked-up that Terra, a teenage girl clearly being manipulated and sexually abused by an adult man, is painted as a totally insane supervillain beyond redemption, while said man gets a sympathetic back story. Beyond that, there's the repeated scenes of Beast Boy making crude comments towards women and in one scene, while transformed as a dog, he looks up Starfire's skirt. Speaking of Starfire, it's sort of disturbing that she's canonically sixteen and constantly drawn in very little cloth Sort of fucked-up that Terra, a teenage girl clearly being manipulated and sexually abused by an adult man, is painted as a totally insane supervillain beyond redemption, while said man gets a sympathetic back story. Beyond that, there's the repeated scenes of Beast Boy making crude comments towards women and in one scene, while transformed as a dog, he looks up Starfire's skirt. Speaking of Starfire, it's sort of disturbing that she's canonically sixteen and constantly drawn in very little clothing. In fact, all the teenaged characters are highly sexualized. I guess what I'm saying is... Comics sure have changed a lot since the early eighties. Other than that, the typical issue of a collected paperback only giving us a small peak at the whole story, this is a pretty good comic book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Arthi

    I really enjoyed this graphic novel. The chapters wer split in a way that kept me intriguied and I think knowing the characters before hand (through Teen Titans and Youn Justice) made the book much more endearing. Is the Judas Contract a sequel to any other New Teen Titans novels? I'd love to see how the team worked with Wally and Tara. I do prefer the characterization of Terra in the TV show to this one, due to the complexity of her inner conflict and the tragedy of the end, but this was still I really enjoyed this graphic novel. The chapters wer split in a way that kept me intriguied and I think knowing the characters before hand (through Teen Titans and Youn Justice) made the book much more endearing. Is the Judas Contract a sequel to any other New Teen Titans novels? I'd love to see how the team worked with Wally and Tara. I do prefer the characterization of Terra in the TV show to this one, due to the complexity of her inner conflict and the tragedy of the end, but this was still interesting and BB still broke my heart (though he was a little too pushy in this book). I also much prefer the TV show Starfire as I feel she has more of a personality beyond loving Dick Grayson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    What a delightful trip to the past for a classic D.C. saga and present the pre-New 52/Rebirth origin of Nightwing. The only reason this is not a 5 star review is that some elements have not aged well. However, the plotting, storytelling and artwork are sublime and truly present the partnership of Wolfman/Perez at the the height of their powers. I know why this book/arc is held in such high esteem, and if I’d read as it came out I’d probably revere it as much as I do The Dark Knight Returns and Bat What a delightful trip to the past for a classic D.C. saga and present the pre-New 52/Rebirth origin of Nightwing. The only reason this is not a 5 star review is that some elements have not aged well. However, the plotting, storytelling and artwork are sublime and truly present the partnership of Wolfman/Perez at the the height of their powers. I know why this book/arc is held in such high esteem, and if I’d read as it came out I’d probably revere it as much as I do The Dark Knight Returns and Batman: Year One.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Johnathon

    Classic Teen Titans story that remains a hallmark of the series, introducing Nightwing and giving the origin to Deathstroke. Wolfman crafts a superb story, delving into each character with plenty of twists and turns, along with truly evolving the series. Terra is a standout as the traitor, at once sweet and dangerous, you find yourself hoping she doesn't turn out to be a turncoat. George Perez's art is gorgeous and first rate storytelling, with some second to none fight scenes and splash pages. Classic Teen Titans story that remains a hallmark of the series, introducing Nightwing and giving the origin to Deathstroke. Wolfman crafts a superb story, delving into each character with plenty of twists and turns, along with truly evolving the series. Terra is a standout as the traitor, at once sweet and dangerous, you find yourself hoping she doesn't turn out to be a turncoat. George Perez's art is gorgeous and first rate storytelling, with some second to none fight scenes and splash pages. I must read for any comic book fan.

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