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A young Spock accompanied his father, the Vulcan diplomat Sarek, to the planet Marath to help negotiate a peace treaty. With the signed treaty safely in hand, they board the Starship Enterprise and head home. Spock is fascinated by the easy acceptance of his Vulcan culture by the bright, adventurous Starfleet crew headed by Captain Robert April and his first officer, Chris A young Spock accompanied his father, the Vulcan diplomat Sarek, to the planet Marath to help negotiate a peace treaty. With the signed treaty safely in hand, they board the Starship Enterprise and head home. Spock is fascinated by the easy acceptance of his Vulcan culture by the bright, adventurous Starfleet crew headed by Captain Robert April and his first officer, Christopher Pike. Spock, half-Vulcan, half-human, is now torn between accepting his position at the Vulcan Science Academy or joining the cadets at Starfleet Academy. Before he can decide, however, he and Sarek discover that not everyone is happy with the treaty. First, rebel forces attempt an assault on the Enterprise, and then Spock's own family is stalked. Spock has a hunch about who is behind the attacks. But to find out -- and set the course for his own destiny -- he'll have to trust his human side.


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A young Spock accompanied his father, the Vulcan diplomat Sarek, to the planet Marath to help negotiate a peace treaty. With the signed treaty safely in hand, they board the Starship Enterprise and head home. Spock is fascinated by the easy acceptance of his Vulcan culture by the bright, adventurous Starfleet crew headed by Captain Robert April and his first officer, Chris A young Spock accompanied his father, the Vulcan diplomat Sarek, to the planet Marath to help negotiate a peace treaty. With the signed treaty safely in hand, they board the Starship Enterprise and head home. Spock is fascinated by the easy acceptance of his Vulcan culture by the bright, adventurous Starfleet crew headed by Captain Robert April and his first officer, Christopher Pike. Spock, half-Vulcan, half-human, is now torn between accepting his position at the Vulcan Science Academy or joining the cadets at Starfleet Academy. Before he can decide, however, he and Sarek discover that not everyone is happy with the treaty. First, rebel forces attempt an assault on the Enterprise, and then Spock's own family is stalked. Spock has a hunch about who is behind the attacks. But to find out -- and set the course for his own destiny -- he'll have to trust his human side.

30 review for Crisis on Vulcan

  1. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    James Tiberius Kirk might be the obvious choice for lead character in the first novel of a Star Trek series about the paths taken by the main crew to eventually arrive on the Enterprise, but I think Spock is the logical choice. The ever-present conflict of reason and emotion in Spock, son of a Vulcan and a human, is the leveraging point for many of the original Star Trek television show's compelling storylines. No other internal battle of nature versus upbringing versus personal desire—not even James Tiberius Kirk might be the obvious choice for lead character in the first novel of a Star Trek series about the paths taken by the main crew to eventually arrive on the Enterprise, but I think Spock is the logical choice. The ever-present conflict of reason and emotion in Spock, son of a Vulcan and a human, is the leveraging point for many of the original Star Trek television show's compelling storylines. No other internal battle of nature versus upbringing versus personal desire—not even that of android Lieutenant Commander Data in Star Trek: The Next Generation—eclipsed Spock's struggle to stay true to his father's strict principles, continually working to suppress his own human emotions and think purely logically in the Vulcan tradition. Spock wanted to fulfill his father's plans for him to study at the Vulcan Science Academy and graduate to a respected career in the vicinity of their home planet, but Starfleet was a draw too strong for Spock to resist, especially compared with his treatment by peers on Vulcan, who in their quest for unadulterated logic violated that same principle by assuming a half-human like Spock was intellectually inferior. Crisis on Vulcan is the adventure that leads up to Spock's decision to pursue his destiny among the stars rather than at home, boldly going where no Vulcan had gone before by joining an organization that welcomed the contributions of a gifted eighteen-year-old half-Vulcan. Crisis on Vulcan joins Spock on the brink of his momentous decision, highlighting the factors that convinced him to cast his lot with Starfleet. The development of a crucial interplanetary treaty calls for the best of ambassadors to mediate, and Spock's father, Sarek, is as good as they come. With faultless reasoning and calm that never cracks, Sarek helps author a deal among the Marathan peoples in a conflict hotspot near Federation space. The treaty is the first step to certifying the Marathans as the Federation's newest member, but not everyone is happy with it. As the Enterprise starship, which has been sent to transport the treaty negotiators to their home planets, prepares for departure, a takeover of the vessel is attempted by hostile aliens. They demand they be given the treaty and Sarek, whom they accuse of rigging the agreement to favor certain factions represented in it. Spock is on the Enterprise merely as an observer—Robert April is captain, and Kirk's predecessor, Christopher Pike, is First Officer—but a ploy performed by Spock gets the Enterprise out of harm's way in the nick of time, without relinquishing the Marathan treaty or Sarek. Captain April is impressed by Spock's ingenuity under fire and promises to recommend him for admittance to Starfleet Academy, an unprecedented opportunity for a young Vulcan. But hostilities over the treaty are far from over. During an early trial period at the Vulcan Science Academy, Spock receives an urgent message from Sarek: he is to return home at once. Spock's human mother has been assaulted by an alien, who was subsequently apprehended but refuses to divulge his reason for attacking. Security is tightened around Sarek and his family, but a second attack targets Spock's cousin, whom the perpetrator evidently mistook for Spock. The situation has become grave: who is coordinating these strikes, and why do they seek vengeance against fair-minded Sarek? When Spock suggests a theory that his father casually dismisses, Spock sees that the only solution may be for him to go rogue, jeopardizing his own life to get to the root of the problem. Spock is a scientist, not a diplomat, but can he rectify this matter of diplomacy that has baffled his father? Will peace on Vulcan, in Marathan society, and with the Federation be preserved? Crisis on Vulcan is a promising start to the Starfleet Academy series, containing some timeless philosophical material. Sarek presents a strong case for passionless logic as key to maintaining peace between alien worlds: "I want you to consider how rare logic is in the universe. Our scientists believe there are hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions of sentient races in the galaxy. What is the norm among them? War, hatred, bigotry, force. What is the greatest good we can do for them? To teach them there is a way out: the way our forebears discovered in the control of emotion and the use of logic." Is there not appeal in the subjugation of emotions that blind people to the weakness and excess of their own ideology, hampering compromise with their neighbor? Is the Vulcan approach not superior to war? Yet Spock observed an alternative methodology on the Enterprise, one no less effective than the Vulcan way: "I mean, all adult Vulcans are alike: serene, humorless, in fundamental agreement. The humans on the Enterprise had different backgrounds, different beliefs, different attitudes. Yet they worked so well together, and each accepted the other." There are some lovely metaphors in Crisis on Vulcan for the Starfleet philosophy, but the garden cultivated by Spock's mother tops them all. "This is a very harmonious place," Spock comments. "You have planted species from forty-nine different worlds. It ought to be a jumble of competing forms and shapes, but it is not. There is a sense here of...completeness." Spock realized in his brief tenure at the Vulcan Science Academy that because of his mixed parentage his Vulcan peers will never totally accept him, certain he'll eventually make a fatal error in logic stemming from his humanity, but on the Enterprise his ethnic diversity is appreciated. Out of many, one. That's the place for Spock to discover his potential, hard as it will be to defy Sarek. And as every Star Trek fan knows, it's the beginning of an interstellar mission for the ages. This book was a nice surprise. I'm not sure it's flawlessly logical—even Sarek errors, in my opinion, by brushing aside Spock's theories without carefully weighing them—but it's one of the better television tie-in books I've read, and it has merit as literature. I'd rate it two and a half stars, and I considered rounding up to three. We understand Spock's difficult career decisions much better after reading this story, and readers' excitement for what comes next is sure to be stoked. I've loved Star Trek most of my life, and Crisis on Vulcan is good reading for the established Trekkie or for kids who'd like to get into the television series. Live long and prosper, Star Trek.

  2. 4 out of 5

    K

    I liked this one from Spock’s perspective, and fully enjoyed the fact that no matter the format Sarek still is still being dragged as a questionable parental figure.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David King

    "Crisis on Vulcan" is the first Young Adult Star Trek book I have actually ever read. I think I skipped them when I was a teenager myself and just went straight onto the adult books. This was probably a shame because whilst I did enjoy it I think I would have been even more impressed had I read it when I was younger. The plot follows a young Spock who accompanies his father, Sarek on a diplomatic mission to the planet Maranth on a diplomatic mission. However, when the pair begin their journey hom "Crisis on Vulcan" is the first Young Adult Star Trek book I have actually ever read. I think I skipped them when I was a teenager myself and just went straight onto the adult books. This was probably a shame because whilst I did enjoy it I think I would have been even more impressed had I read it when I was younger. The plot follows a young Spock who accompanies his father, Sarek on a diplomatic mission to the planet Maranth on a diplomatic mission. However, when the pair begin their journey home aboard the USS Enterprise, the ship is attacked by a faction from Maranth who are not happy with the peace deal just brokered by Sarek. Spock happens to be on the bridge at the time and manages to help the crew facilitate an escape for the Enterprise, but in doing so he plants a seed of doubt in his own mind about his own future. Therefore we follow Spock as he tries to decide if he should continue with his plans to go the Vulcan Science Academy or if he should abandon them and actually join Starfleet Academy. To be honest the plot itself was rather standard and full of quick fix solutions but I still found it surprisingly fascinating and enjoyable. This was because I loved seeing Spock's interactions with both his parents and the way in which Vulcan society dealt with his half-human nature. There were also some rather insightful elements for the intended YA audience as the narrative tried to highlight the internal struggles of a character growing up and seeing how their choices could radically affect their life. I do have one little niggle with the book and that is in regards to the sub-title which is a little bit misleading. Whilst this is part of the Starfleet Academy grouping of novels there isn't actually any time spent at the academy. The story covers Spock's life prior to joining the Academy which I had no issue with but people should be aware of this before they pick up the novel. Overall, this is a quick and easy read that uncovers a little bit about both Spock's family life and Vulcan society. I have defiantly read more complex Star Trek novels before, but it was definitely entertaining enough to please any young fan of Star Trek and I think many adults would enjoy following some of Spock's youth.

  4. 4 out of 5

    John

    I was not expecting to enjoy this as much as I did... Back when J.J. Abrams' first TREK movie came out, I tried reading Book #1 of the STARFLEET ACADEMY series launched that same year. And I remember how much it sucked. I also started reading the follow-up to CRISIS ON VULCAN--i.e. AFTERSHOCK by John Vornholt--and got bored within the first 5 pages. But CRISIS ON VULCAN was a treat. Not only was it surprisingly well-written and one of the smartest middle-school-level books I've ever read, it also p I was not expecting to enjoy this as much as I did... Back when J.J. Abrams' first TREK movie came out, I tried reading Book #1 of the STARFLEET ACADEMY series launched that same year. And I remember how much it sucked. I also started reading the follow-up to CRISIS ON VULCAN--i.e. AFTERSHOCK by John Vornholt--and got bored within the first 5 pages. But CRISIS ON VULCAN was a treat. Not only was it surprisingly well-written and one of the smartest middle-school-level books I've ever read, it also provided a rare glimpse of Captains April and Pike, as well as an interesting look at why Spock chose to attend Starfleet Academy rather than the Vulcan Science Academy. Part of why the book works so well is that only a single chapter is set at an academy, and Spock almost exclusively interacts with adults rather than "kids" his own age. Best of all, the book aligns very smoothly with Star Trek canon (as opposed to AFTERSHOCK, which feels as though it's set in an alternate universe). My only complaints with CRISIS ON VULCAN are that it contains a couple enormous coincidences that smack of lazy plotting, and the resolution to the titular "crisis" is very weak. Still, pretty darn good for a YA entry.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    I used to read Star Trek and Star Trek TNG novels on a very frequent basis but have sort of fallen off in my readership over the last few years. When I saw that there was a new series about starfleet academy dealing with the characters at a younger age I was curious and picked this one up. It's been in my "to read" pile for yonks and I finally decided to tackle it. It's interesting to see Spock as a young man still living at home and very much under his father's sway. The book uses all that we'v I used to read Star Trek and Star Trek TNG novels on a very frequent basis but have sort of fallen off in my readership over the last few years. When I saw that there was a new series about starfleet academy dealing with the characters at a younger age I was curious and picked this one up. It's been in my "to read" pile for yonks and I finally decided to tackle it. It's interesting to see Spock as a young man still living at home and very much under his father's sway. The book uses all that we've gleaned over the years about Spock and is faithful to the canon while giving an adventure for a young Spock. The book is well written and fast moving and concentrates on some cultural taboos that Sarek and Spock stumble upon while trying to help a less logical race end a war and join the Federation. While clearly aimed at a younger audience than the standard Star trek novels this book is in no way juvenile. It was worth the reading time and had some of the best of the elements that I've grown to love in these books over the years. If you're a trekkie, by all means check it out.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    Ambassador Sarek is concluding the negotiations of a peace treaty in the Marath system. His teenaged son, Spock, is along as part of the entourage to observe and learn before his admittance to the Vulcan Science Academy. But not all parties are pleased with the terms of the treaty and dangerous assassins pursue Sarek and Spock back to Vulcan. Spock needs to help his father determine what part of the treaty is upsetting a rebel faction before Vulcan closes its borders to all outsiders. I was actua Ambassador Sarek is concluding the negotiations of a peace treaty in the Marath system. His teenaged son, Spock, is along as part of the entourage to observe and learn before his admittance to the Vulcan Science Academy. But not all parties are pleased with the terms of the treaty and dangerous assassins pursue Sarek and Spock back to Vulcan. Spock needs to help his father determine what part of the treaty is upsetting a rebel faction before Vulcan closes its borders to all outsiders. I was actually intrigued and impressed with this story. As a YA novel I expected just a silly little actioner focused on a teen version of Spock that offered little beyond obvious tie-in potential. There's actually more going on here - insight into the negotiation of a treaty, a glimpse at an interesting alien culture, and a young man's decision-making process that will color his future. The downside is that not all of these things are as detailed or have as much subtlety and nuance as they might be in an adult novel, but it provides an interesting base for a younger reader. Spock's journey through the story is somewhat typical of a teen novel - feelings of estrangement, being an outsider, dealing with parental and peer pressures and the like. But seeing how inspired he is by his short visit aboard the Enterprise and how he feels accepted and part of something larger than himself was nice to see. Later in the book, he has a nice discussion with his mother about his future and his decisions. We don't often see a lot of Spock and his mother, so this was pretty enjoyable. The most disappointing portion of the book was actually the end. Everything wrapped up so quickly with a lot of "tell me, don't show me" kind of exposition. You could tell the Stricklands were hitting a page count and needed to wrap it up. I feel there were a lot of missed opportunities here that I would love to have seen played out for readers. The fact that I was actually looking for more, says a lot about how invested I was in the story. Yes, we get to see a couple of other Trek characters like Christopher Pike (not yet a captain) and Robert April, first captain of the Enterprise. The book doesn't have a lot of fan-pandering, but the Enterprise sequence covers that well enough. There's more than a little Wesley Crusher in Spock at this point, so it was a little cringy, but still kind of fun. Overall, I was pleased and surprised by this book. I had low expectations of a YA media tie-in book, but this one actually rose above that. No, it's not a brilliant piece of literature, but it was enjoyable all the same.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gauna

    I saw that Brad Strickland is still offering his first book ( Crisis on Vulcan ) and audiobook for FREE on his website. Other authors should take notice.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joana

    "Ad Astra" "Ad Astra"

  9. 5 out of 5

    Madisyn

    Tough to put down.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ADRIENE

    I like sciencefictions and this fits the bill.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tarah

    Great plot, twists and turns.

  12. 5 out of 5

    graveyardgremlin

    Borrowed from: https://openlibrary.org/works/OL15103... Borrowed from: https://openlibrary.org/works/OL15103...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mikael Kuoppala

    Strickland gives us a surprisingly insightful novel that explores the complexities of the fictional Vulcan psyche in a nice way. This book really captures the essence of "young adult"-fiction by presenting the struggles of a character facing the world alone for the first time. The plot is pretty simple, with a too obvious allegory and a quick-fix- resolution, but the plot is not the main point here anyway. Strickland gives us a surprisingly insightful novel that explores the complexities of the fictional Vulcan psyche in a nice way. This book really captures the essence of "young adult"-fiction by presenting the struggles of a character facing the world alone for the first time. The plot is pretty simple, with a too obvious allegory and a quick-fix- resolution, but the plot is not the main point here anyway.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Sarek is negotiating a peace treaty, his son is along to observe. They spend some time on the Enterprise, and that makes Spock think about his future. This is a decent story that outlines how different other Vulcans treated him at the Science academy. The terrorism storyline just goes to heighten the feeling of isolation Spock feels. A good read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Brown

    This story takes us into Spock's childhood and looks at how he came to choose Starfleet over the Vulcan Science Academy. There is danger in the plot but the crux of the story in undoubtedly Spock's inner debate between logic or emotion and how that is reflected in his parents. This story takes us into Spock's childhood and looks at how he came to choose Starfleet over the Vulcan Science Academy. There is danger in the plot but the crux of the story in undoubtedly Spock's inner debate between logic or emotion and how that is reflected in his parents.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Zuzana

    Quick and easy read. YA. About Spock's youth, his relationship with his father and why he decided to join Starfleet. Quick and easy read. YA. About Spock's youth, his relationship with his father and why he decided to join Starfleet.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Yoo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kirk Domenico

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kiri

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amir Fallah

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julia

  22. 4 out of 5

    Annette

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Beth

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vicki Bushnell

  25. 4 out of 5

    Janie

  26. 4 out of 5

    Julie Soden

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brian Stuhr

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christine Simmons

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adam Cross

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robin Powell

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