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In ten stories that read like parables, Meera Nair depicts contemporary Indian life with fierce precision and an irresistible blend of humor, wit, and pathos, firmly establishing herself as a striking new voice in Indian fiction. An American porn flick wreaks havoc on the life of an Indian man, much to the dismay of his wife. A young man’s uncanny gift for sculpting statues In ten stories that read like parables, Meera Nair depicts contemporary Indian life with fierce precision and an irresistible blend of humor, wit, and pathos, firmly establishing herself as a striking new voice in Indian fiction. An American porn flick wreaks havoc on the life of an Indian man, much to the dismay of his wife. A young man’s uncanny gift for sculpting statues out of sand makes the women of his village swoon–until the men plot to put a stop to it. A small town of “utter inconsequence” prepares excitedly for a visit from President Clinton. This stunning debut collection offers brilliant snapshots of life’s small reversals and a broad-stroke portrait of our times.


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In ten stories that read like parables, Meera Nair depicts contemporary Indian life with fierce precision and an irresistible blend of humor, wit, and pathos, firmly establishing herself as a striking new voice in Indian fiction. An American porn flick wreaks havoc on the life of an Indian man, much to the dismay of his wife. A young man’s uncanny gift for sculpting statues In ten stories that read like parables, Meera Nair depicts contemporary Indian life with fierce precision and an irresistible blend of humor, wit, and pathos, firmly establishing herself as a striking new voice in Indian fiction. An American porn flick wreaks havoc on the life of an Indian man, much to the dismay of his wife. A young man’s uncanny gift for sculpting statues out of sand makes the women of his village swoon–until the men plot to put a stop to it. A small town of “utter inconsequence” prepares excitedly for a visit from President Clinton. This stunning debut collection offers brilliant snapshots of life’s small reversals and a broad-stroke portrait of our times.

30 review for Video: Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    Susan Oleksiw

    This collection of ten stories set in India and the United States is stunningly rich in character and situation, taking the reader into unseen lives. Nair writes with acute sensibility about a variety of individuals. In the first story a young wife takes refuge in an outdoors bathroom after her husband asks her to do the unthinkable. In the next story,a young boy delivers breakfast to a traveling salesman, who opens his eyes to the larger world. An old man watches his world built of generations This collection of ten stories set in India and the United States is stunningly rich in character and situation, taking the reader into unseen lives. Nair writes with acute sensibility about a variety of individuals. In the first story a young wife takes refuge in an outdoors bathroom after her husband asks her to do the unthinkable. In the next story,a young boy delivers breakfast to a traveling salesman, who opens his eyes to the larger world. An old man watches his world built of generations past crumble acre by acre, and a young woman revisits her childhood home. Two young boys each discover a special talent. A village prepares for the visit of the president, and a confused and unhappy husband confronts the American holiday of Valentine's Day. A young cousin destroys his younger cousin's innocence. These are real stories, with children living their lives surrounded by adults, adults struggling against the ennui of a secure but boring job, the effort to honor the dead while the city around them breaks out in riots and chaos. This is Nair's first book, and it augurs a brilliant career to come.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eliza Victoria

    Indian writer Meera Nair writes with such emotional and descriptive precision that her fiction are surefooted, affecting, immersive, transportive. She writes with fluid prose, but I was more impressed with her collection’s wide range of characters: the husband who yearns for a blow-job (his first!), the poor delivery boy enchanted with a customer, the teenager watching as his grandfather loses his land to the Communists, three advertising professionals on a tense vacation in a town developed by Indian writer Meera Nair writes with such emotional and descriptive precision that her fiction are surefooted, affecting, immersive, transportive. She writes with fluid prose, but I was more impressed with her collection’s wide range of characters: the husband who yearns for a blow-job (his first!), the poor delivery boy enchanted with a customer, the teenager watching as his grandfather loses his land to the Communists, three advertising professionals on a tense vacation in a town developed by the British, a female journalist and her sick father now withering away, an editor and his wife living with both their mothers, the town folks ecstatic over the reported arrival of the President of the United States. So many worlds here. My favorite stories: “Video”, “Sixteen Days in Summer”, “My Grandfather Dreams of Fences”, “A Certain Sense of Place”, and “Vishnukumar’s Valentine’s Day”.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    i am not one to read short story novels. especially with no sex involved. though, the title story video did involve some. this book was a change for me because it was written by an indian author. it was harder to grasp the culture and idioms than the usual japanese, korean, chinese books that i read. but, fortunately, i do know quite a bit about the indian culture (though slim to none about their religion and less about the languages). i learned some interesting facts, and while some of the stor i am not one to read short story novels. especially with no sex involved. though, the title story video did involve some. this book was a change for me because it was written by an indian author. it was harder to grasp the culture and idioms than the usual japanese, korean, chinese books that i read. but, fortunately, i do know quite a bit about the indian culture (though slim to none about their religion and less about the languages). i learned some interesting facts, and while some of the stories shared similarities, it was not repetitive rewording of idential plot ideas. i felt that the more i read, with each new chapter, the author became more comfortable in her style of writing, the writing style seemed so innocent that it was shocking when “curse words” as a characters string of thought, or lustrous scenes occured. her style of writing with incomplete sentences is similar to mine, so i felt as if i shared a kindred spirit with her. i did like how she captured the male and female characters equally and with almost the same voice. she managed to change the tone and point of view in almost all of the stories, while still having some trademark-ness left. my favorite stories were a certain sense of place, video, and vishu’s valentine day. i did not like curry tree because it was …w eird. about smell? she describes flavors of food very well in this story though. just remembered, a common thing about her storied was journalism. good way of incorporating local events.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    A rather unremarkable collection; the humorous ones ("A Warm Welcome to the President, Insh'Allah!" and "The Curry Leaf Tree") were better than the others, which seemed to try too hard. The first and title story of the collection, "Video," was absolutely disgusting, unless I'm really not understanding something. It and "Summer" should carry trigger warnings for rape and sexual assault. Indian (or hypen-Indian) authors writing stories that take place in either India or America are getting really st A rather unremarkable collection; the humorous ones ("A Warm Welcome to the President, Insh'Allah!" and "The Curry Leaf Tree") were better than the others, which seemed to try too hard. The first and title story of the collection, "Video," was absolutely disgusting, unless I'm really not understanding something. It and "Summer" should carry trigger warnings for rape and sexual assault. Indian (or hypen-Indian) authors writing stories that take place in either India or America are getting really stale. This collection is a good example: the story entitled "Sixteen Days of December" delves a little into Indian history, that of the destruction of the Babri Masjid mosque in Ayodhya by Hindu fundamentalists, but it seems to skirt around the situation at the risk of possibly alienating an American who knows little about the topic. It's "just ethnic enough," a trope that needs to be buried in modern literature.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Video by Meera Nair is a collection of short stories that were beautifully crafted and of varied topics. One of my favorite stories was about a small Indian village preparing for President Clinton's visit. They decided they needed a public bathroom for him to use. It required a great deal of cooperation and effort, but they had it ready in time. Unfortunately, the President's visit was canceled at the last minute. The crowd was at a loss, but then they remembered the bathroom and one of crowd br Video by Meera Nair is a collection of short stories that were beautifully crafted and of varied topics. One of my favorite stories was about a small Indian village preparing for President Clinton's visit. They decided they needed a public bathroom for him to use. It required a great deal of cooperation and effort, but they had it ready in time. Unfortunately, the President's visit was canceled at the last minute. The crowd was at a loss, but then they remembered the bathroom and one of crowd broke the lock on the door. He carefully checked it out and then proceeded to use it for its intended purpose, while a line formed outside. Meera Nair is a delightful author and I look forward to reading more by this talented author.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mneleventhirty

    Ok, first of all don't confuse the author with Mira Nair (filmmaker extraordinaire: that is sarcasm by the way). Video: Stories by Meera Nair is a pretty nondescript book. I just chanced upon it in the county library. It is a book of short stories. In case you are wondering about the title of the book, theres nothing special, just that it happened to be the title of the first short story. I sort of liked the book. The stories are not special and they are not for anyone who is looking for happy o Ok, first of all don't confuse the author with Mira Nair (filmmaker extraordinaire: that is sarcasm by the way). Video: Stories by Meera Nair is a pretty nondescript book. I just chanced upon it in the county library. It is a book of short stories. In case you are wondering about the title of the book, theres nothing special, just that it happened to be the title of the first short story. I sort of liked the book. The stories are not special and they are not for anyone who is looking for happy or sad endings, they just end - abruptly. They go through so many hued emotions, but still there is no leaning towards what is right or wrong. Do give it a shot.

  7. 5 out of 5

    I

    Nair's collection of short stories provide an intimate and varied view of contemporary Indian life. With a flair for small details and touching scenes, Nair allows her characters to develop without forcing each moment. Her only downfall is that sometimes the characters overwhelm her voice, which creates a bit of a lull in the stories (I often found myself flipping forward to see how much was left.) For a debut collection, however, I find myself very curious to see how her voice matures.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I picked this book up for $10 in a discount shop, mistakenly confusing the author with the filmmaker Mira Nair. I love reading stories set in India (maybe because so many of my absolute favourite novels are set in India and/ or written by Indians) but I found this collection to be dull and lacking. Maybe the best way I can put it is I don't think I really learnt anything new about the world. Highlights were The Curry Leaf Tree, Sixteen Days in December and The Lodger in Room 726.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    The last in my series of short stories, this interesting peek into Indian life was a quick read. Of particular note to me were The Lodger in Room 726 for its mystery and questions and My Grandfather Dreams of Fences for its coming of age story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Great stories.

  11. 5 out of 5

    HeavyReader

    I read this at the beginning of a 23 day drug study that involved two psychotropic drugs. I liked it. I like short stories because I can read them quickly. These were quick and good.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lois

    10 short stories. A quick read, none terribly memorable, but ok.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Khaliah Williams

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shuriu

  15. 5 out of 5

    Aditi Varma

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marshall

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shaleen

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stefania

  20. 4 out of 5

    Janani Iyer

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jo

  22. 4 out of 5

    BookSwim.com Book Rental Online

  23. 4 out of 5

    Liza

  24. 5 out of 5

    K.C.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashik

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nupur

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michaela

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shreya

  30. 4 out of 5

    Crazycatlady

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