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Colonel Roosevelt and the White House Gang

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When Theodore Roosevelt became president at age forty-two upon the assassination of William McKinley, he was the youngest President to have ever served - then and now - and was father to six children, ranging in age from three to seventeen. During his term, watching the Roosevelt family became a national pastime. Each day, news of the First Family was consumed by newspaper When Theodore Roosevelt became president at age forty-two upon the assassination of William McKinley, he was the youngest President to have ever served - then and now - and was father to six children, ranging in age from three to seventeen. During his term, watching the Roosevelt family became a national pastime. Each day, news of the First Family was consumed by newspaper readers. The best known Roosevelt child was, of course, the President himself. His pillow fights with his sons, sometimes while keeping the cabinet waiting, were notorious. One magazine described the phenomenon by saying people could no more ignore the Roosevelt stories "than a small boy can turn his head away from a circus parade followed by a steam calliope." Roosevelt's children, along with some of their cousins and friends, came to be called the White House Gang. Roosevelt, certainly the most famous Gang member, was singularly able to encourage the positive qualities of his and other boys while leading the United States into the 20th Century. But the Gang's real leader was Roosevelt's youngest child Quentin. They roller skated in the hallways, stilt-walked through high ceilinged rooms, spit-balled portraits and explored every possible space of the White House from roof to attic to basement. One of their favorite games was to stage "attacks" upon various government office buildings. "This book tells how Theodore Roosevelt handled his children, how he won their love and respect, and how he won them to his way of thinking. There ought to be an Amendment to the Constitution compelling every mother and father to read this book. It is a fascinating story, and if you read it and heed it, you will be a better parent. Your children will be happier, and you will be happier." ----Dale Carnegie, author of "How to Win Friends and Influence People," April 20, 1938


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When Theodore Roosevelt became president at age forty-two upon the assassination of William McKinley, he was the youngest President to have ever served - then and now - and was father to six children, ranging in age from three to seventeen. During his term, watching the Roosevelt family became a national pastime. Each day, news of the First Family was consumed by newspaper When Theodore Roosevelt became president at age forty-two upon the assassination of William McKinley, he was the youngest President to have ever served - then and now - and was father to six children, ranging in age from three to seventeen. During his term, watching the Roosevelt family became a national pastime. Each day, news of the First Family was consumed by newspaper readers. The best known Roosevelt child was, of course, the President himself. His pillow fights with his sons, sometimes while keeping the cabinet waiting, were notorious. One magazine described the phenomenon by saying people could no more ignore the Roosevelt stories "than a small boy can turn his head away from a circus parade followed by a steam calliope." Roosevelt's children, along with some of their cousins and friends, came to be called the White House Gang. Roosevelt, certainly the most famous Gang member, was singularly able to encourage the positive qualities of his and other boys while leading the United States into the 20th Century. But the Gang's real leader was Roosevelt's youngest child Quentin. They roller skated in the hallways, stilt-walked through high ceilinged rooms, spit-balled portraits and explored every possible space of the White House from roof to attic to basement. One of their favorite games was to stage "attacks" upon various government office buildings. "This book tells how Theodore Roosevelt handled his children, how he won their love and respect, and how he won them to his way of thinking. There ought to be an Amendment to the Constitution compelling every mother and father to read this book. It is a fascinating story, and if you read it and heed it, you will be a better parent. Your children will be happier, and you will be happier." ----Dale Carnegie, author of "How to Win Friends and Influence People," April 20, 1938

33 review for Colonel Roosevelt and the White House Gang

  1. 4 out of 5

    Don LaFountaine

    This was an enjoyable book that felt like it was written towards an audience of younger children about the ages of 8 - 12 years of age. The book follows some of the antics of "The White House Gang" - a group of kids that were friends with Quentin, one of President Roosevelt's children. President Roosevelt sent Quentin to a public school, (which would be unheard of now, not only from a safety point of view, but also from a political elitist viewpoint as well) in order to make him, through experien This was an enjoyable book that felt like it was written towards an audience of younger children about the ages of 8 - 12 years of age. The book follows some of the antics of "The White House Gang" - a group of kids that were friends with Quentin, one of President Roosevelt's children. President Roosevelt sent Quentin to a public school, (which would be unheard of now, not only from a safety point of view, but also from a political elitist viewpoint as well) in order to make him, through experience, appreciate the advantages that were afforded him before he received them. After a brief period, a number of kids started to gravitate toward "Q", as he was called, and their adventures in and out of the White House, in and around Washington, and with President Roosevelt began. Sometimes they would throw spitballs at one another, and sometimes they would fight and give one another black eyes, swollen lips, and scrapes and bruises. Then there were the times that they biked all over Washington D.C., threw snowballs off the roof of the White House, and even had pillow fights with the President. Basically, it was an everyday group of young boys that were friends, and that just happened to have a very powerful "member" in the President of the United States. Most of the time the book was focused on Quentin, and how he was the leader of the gang, and not only because he had the hangout spot for the kids. With that said, there is a fairly large amount about President Roosevelt and Mrs. Roosevelt, though those stories and thoughts are not told in an unbiased way. The President and his family obviously had a profound influence on the writer, which can be clearly seen within the pages. The book was originally written as "The White House Gang" in 1929, and the currently listed author is the grandson of the of the original author. I think he does a good job keeping the original story intact while interspersing updated information of the 21st century. I especially enjoyed the write-ups of some of the Roosevelt family at the end of the book, and was saddened and yet somehow uplifted about reading about Quentin's last battle in World War I. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading about historical happenings from the early 20th century, (even if they are biased). I would also recommend the book to Tween age children. It is an engrossing book with fun stories that may spark an interest in history, and will at least be a fairly easy read for the kids. However, as a warning, parents that feel that kids should be constantly protected and not exposed to roughhousing, fighting, and sometimes dangerous antics may not want their children to read this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Olga

    interesting and entertaining. Gives lots of amusing stories. Enjoyable

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tia

  4. 4 out of 5

    Denise

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Demsky

  7. 4 out of 5

    Terry Pearson

  8. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heather Williams

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  11. 4 out of 5

    Betty

  12. 5 out of 5

    SALLY WHITE

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

  14. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kim Myers

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Cobb Sabatini

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Beck

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Bingham

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mitzie Atkins

  24. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joy Adams

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gwen

  28. 5 out of 5

    Exapno Mapcase

  29. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

  31. 4 out of 5

    Chaplain2

  32. 4 out of 5

    Angelia

  33. 4 out of 5

    Carol

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