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The the Wal-Mart Revolution: How Big-Box Stores Benefit Consumers, Workers, and the Economy

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The activities of Wal-Mart and other big-box retailers have become rallying cries for both sides of the political aisle. This book is aimed at those involved in debates over Wal-Mart's impact on worker wages, labor issues, and health-insurance and land-use policies. The Wal-Mart Revolution provides useful facts about the company, the U.S. retail industry, labor economics, The activities of Wal-Mart and other big-box retailers have become rallying cries for both sides of the political aisle. This book is aimed at those involved in debates over Wal-Mart's impact on worker wages, labor issues, and health-insurance and land-use policies. The Wal-Mart Revolution provides useful facts about the company, the U.S. retail industry, labor economics, health-care policy, and land-use realities in America today. Economist Richard Vedder and public-private partnerships expert Wendell Cox painstakingly analyze available evidence before concluding that the economic transformation in American retailing which is personified by Wal-Mart has largely been good for Americans and the economy. Wal-Mart's basic business strategies have had a profoundly positive impact on America's productivity, wages, consumer prices, and other key economic variables. Though the book was written without any cooperation from Wal-Mart, Vedder and Cox address several criticisms often lobbed at the company and demolish them one-by-one: - Wal-Mart workers are paid fairly--given their level of skills and experience, and compared to other retail firms, Wal-Mart employees do well - Wal-Mart's fringe benefits--health-care coverage, retirement benefits, and more---are similar to those of other retail firms, and very few Wal-Mart workers go without health insurance - Big boxes mean big business: communities with new Wal-Mart stores typically enjoy increased employment and incomes after the store opens - Wal-Mart benefits the poor, in particular, in the form of lower prices and new job opportunities - Attempts to keep Wal-Mart out of communities through zoning restrictions, mandatory health insurance, or special high minimum wages hurt citizens, especially those with lower incomes


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The activities of Wal-Mart and other big-box retailers have become rallying cries for both sides of the political aisle. This book is aimed at those involved in debates over Wal-Mart's impact on worker wages, labor issues, and health-insurance and land-use policies. The Wal-Mart Revolution provides useful facts about the company, the U.S. retail industry, labor economics, The activities of Wal-Mart and other big-box retailers have become rallying cries for both sides of the political aisle. This book is aimed at those involved in debates over Wal-Mart's impact on worker wages, labor issues, and health-insurance and land-use policies. The Wal-Mart Revolution provides useful facts about the company, the U.S. retail industry, labor economics, health-care policy, and land-use realities in America today. Economist Richard Vedder and public-private partnerships expert Wendell Cox painstakingly analyze available evidence before concluding that the economic transformation in American retailing which is personified by Wal-Mart has largely been good for Americans and the economy. Wal-Mart's basic business strategies have had a profoundly positive impact on America's productivity, wages, consumer prices, and other key economic variables. Though the book was written without any cooperation from Wal-Mart, Vedder and Cox address several criticisms often lobbed at the company and demolish them one-by-one: - Wal-Mart workers are paid fairly--given their level of skills and experience, and compared to other retail firms, Wal-Mart employees do well - Wal-Mart's fringe benefits--health-care coverage, retirement benefits, and more---are similar to those of other retail firms, and very few Wal-Mart workers go without health insurance - Big boxes mean big business: communities with new Wal-Mart stores typically enjoy increased employment and incomes after the store opens - Wal-Mart benefits the poor, in particular, in the form of lower prices and new job opportunities - Attempts to keep Wal-Mart out of communities through zoning restrictions, mandatory health insurance, or special high minimum wages hurt citizens, especially those with lower incomes

35 review for The the Wal-Mart Revolution: How Big-Box Stores Benefit Consumers, Workers, and the Economy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne Reilly

    "When productivity rises, wages and standards of living go up." This book was published in 2006 and seems to be written for or by Walmart lobbyists, but it did have lots of statistics and made me view Walmart in a different way. I look forward to reading a more recent and two-sided look at big box stores. "When productivity rises, wages and standards of living go up." This book was published in 2006 and seems to be written for or by Walmart lobbyists, but it did have lots of statistics and made me view Walmart in a different way. I look forward to reading a more recent and two-sided look at big box stores.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Johnny

    This is a very pro-Wal-Mart book, but the statistics presented in this book feel very sloppy. I haven't looked up the original studies referenced in the book, which by themselves could have been used to persuasively argue the premise that Wal-Mart is a net benefit to the American economy. I hope that the statistical analyses in those studies are more rigorous than the ones the authors did themselves because the authors showed a very cavalier attitude toward the proper use of regression tools and This is a very pro-Wal-Mart book, but the statistics presented in this book feel very sloppy. I haven't looked up the original studies referenced in the book, which by themselves could have been used to persuasively argue the premise that Wal-Mart is a net benefit to the American economy. I hope that the statistical analyses in those studies are more rigorous than the ones the authors did themselves because the authors showed a very cavalier attitude toward the proper use of regression tools and techniques. As a consequence, this book read like pseudoscientific babble instead of the scholarly paper that the authors had hoped to present.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kori Morris

    I used this book, three others, and about 15 studies on Wal-Mart to write a huge research paper for a history class. When i started reading, i was almost positive my thesis would be about the negative (though mostly negligible) effects of big box stores. Beyond a doubt, having researched independently and found many of the studies mentioned in the book again, this book is well researched, absolutely correct, and presented in an interesting and clear to follow format that goes point by point thro I used this book, three others, and about 15 studies on Wal-Mart to write a huge research paper for a history class. When i started reading, i was almost positive my thesis would be about the negative (though mostly negligible) effects of big box stores. Beyond a doubt, having researched independently and found many of the studies mentioned in the book again, this book is well researched, absolutely correct, and presented in an interesting and clear to follow format that goes point by point through how the stores positively affect growth, industry, the American and global economy, and their workers.

  4. 4 out of 5

    John

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  6. 4 out of 5

    Donald B.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Heben

  8. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Morris

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael Marx

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grant

  12. 5 out of 5

    John Reis

  13. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  14. 5 out of 5

    house targaryen

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Faeh

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tomasz Stępień

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jim Benson

  18. 4 out of 5

    Franco

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeejo

  20. 5 out of 5

    Peter Owen

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kingning Lam

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rekha Sharma

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mia

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gabriella

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Houchin

  27. 4 out of 5

    Donald Forster

  28. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jo.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Meintzer

  31. 4 out of 5

    Amy C

  32. 5 out of 5

    Erin MacKinnon

  33. 5 out of 5

    Pedro Jorge

  34. 4 out of 5

    Linus Vieira

  35. 4 out of 5

    Helga

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