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Blame Changer: understanding domestic violence

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Blame Changer by psychologist Carmel O'Brien, former head of Clinical Services at Victoria's Doncare, provides straight forward answers to common questions and aims to debunk pervasive myths around what Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull last year called "one of Australia's greatest shames" domestic violence. But Blame Changer is much more than the definitive rebuttal of some Blame Changer by psychologist Carmel O'Brien, former head of Clinical Services at Victoria's Doncare, provides straight forward answers to common questions and aims to debunk pervasive myths around what Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull last year called "one of Australia's greatest shames" domestic violence. But Blame Changer is much more than the definitive rebuttal of some of society's most damaging, ill-informed and pervasive attitudes about domestic violence. It sounds a clarion call for a change in the way we talk - at the dinner table, on social media and in national conversation at the highest levels - about women and the violence they experience. What's more, it's also a practical guide that will help victims of abuse: Blame Changer also shows friends and family how to help a victim of abuse and challenges how the Family Court system responds to allegations of abuse. This is the definitive guide to domestic violence in Australia, by a woman who has worked with countless victims over many years.


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Blame Changer by psychologist Carmel O'Brien, former head of Clinical Services at Victoria's Doncare, provides straight forward answers to common questions and aims to debunk pervasive myths around what Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull last year called "one of Australia's greatest shames" domestic violence. But Blame Changer is much more than the definitive rebuttal of some Blame Changer by psychologist Carmel O'Brien, former head of Clinical Services at Victoria's Doncare, provides straight forward answers to common questions and aims to debunk pervasive myths around what Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull last year called "one of Australia's greatest shames" domestic violence. But Blame Changer is much more than the definitive rebuttal of some of society's most damaging, ill-informed and pervasive attitudes about domestic violence. It sounds a clarion call for a change in the way we talk - at the dinner table, on social media and in national conversation at the highest levels - about women and the violence they experience. What's more, it's also a practical guide that will help victims of abuse: Blame Changer also shows friends and family how to help a victim of abuse and challenges how the Family Court system responds to allegations of abuse. This is the definitive guide to domestic violence in Australia, by a woman who has worked with countless victims over many years.

35 review for Blame Changer: understanding domestic violence

  1. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    This wasn't too bad - It's not my normal area of interest, but as a victim of domestic violence, it was interesting to see the perspective of a researched book on the topic. I disagreed with some of the points; I feel like there were a lot of assumptions and stereotypes addressed by the author. Honestly, in every domestic violence situation, there may be similarities, but most situations are largely different. There are different triggers in every set of circumstances. In a positive light, however This wasn't too bad - It's not my normal area of interest, but as a victim of domestic violence, it was interesting to see the perspective of a researched book on the topic. I disagreed with some of the points; I feel like there were a lot of assumptions and stereotypes addressed by the author. Honestly, in every domestic violence situation, there may be similarities, but most situations are largely different. There are different triggers in every set of circumstances. In a positive light, however, I feel like the author alluded to the challenges that a large percentage of the population endure every single day. Many people trapped in a domestic violence situation lack the means to escape, and are essentially kept subservient to the abuser in fear of becoming homeless. Often, the abuser uses threats and fear to keep the victim/s in line. The book provided some interesting facts and a brief introduction to the issues that are encountered in domestic violence cases.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ms_prue

    A short but comprehensive introduction to the issue, an excellent companion to Lundy Bancroft (Why Does He Do That) and Kate Manne (The Logic of Misogyny). Next to read The Quincy Solution.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Toby Blake

    An education. This is the book to read to understand domestic violence/intimate partner violence. To understand there are no excuses only choices made to hurt someone close.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    Essential reading for all Australians.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bogan_ville

  6. 5 out of 5

    Leanne

  7. 5 out of 5

    Diana

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gemma Collins

  9. 5 out of 5

    Schizanthus Nerd

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dorota

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jane Roycroft

  14. 5 out of 5

    Vanitha

    Very insightful in helping the reader to understand this delicate and prevalent issue in our societies. It will answer many questions that you may have thought to ask of domestic violence survivors which you really should not be asking.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  16. 4 out of 5

    Georgia

  17. 4 out of 5

    Addie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gloria

  19. 4 out of 5

    Carmel O'Brien

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  21. 4 out of 5

    Deb

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sally

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bex

  24. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bec

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sallyann Richards

  27. 5 out of 5

    Meg

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jade

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Dunbar

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Randall

  31. 5 out of 5

    Sofie

  32. 5 out of 5

    Michele Harrod

  33. 5 out of 5

    Khandis Blake

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  35. 5 out of 5

    Taj

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