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This Is How We Do It: One Day in the Lives of Seven Kids from around the World (Easy Reader Books, Children Around the World Books, Preschool Prep Books)

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Follow one day in the real lives of seven kids from around the worldItaly, Japan, Iran, India, Peru, Uganda, and Russia! In Japan, Kei plays Freeze Tag, while in Uganda, Daphine likes to jump rope. While the way they play may differ, the shared rhythm of their daysand this one world we all shareunites them. This genuine exchange provides a window into traditions that may be Follow one day in the real lives of seven kids from around the world—Italy, Japan, Iran, India, Peru, Uganda, and Russia! In Japan, Kei plays Freeze Tag, while in Uganda, Daphine likes to jump rope. While the way they play may differ, the shared rhythm of their days—and this one world we all share—unites them. This genuine exchange provides a window into traditions that may be different from our own as well as mirrors reflecting our common experiences. Inspired by his own travels, Matt Lamonthe transports readers across the globe and back with this luminous and thoughtful picture book. Perfect for kids learning about new cultures and customs Educates children on the importance of similarities and differences Gives kids a unique look into the lives of others across the globe If you enjoyed Carson Ellis' Home, you're sure to enjoy the window into the world provided by This is How We Do It. This children's picture book is ideal for parents or teachers looking for the following: World Book for Kids Travel Book for Kids Beginning Reading Books Cultures for Kids Books Families Around the World Books


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Follow one day in the real lives of seven kids from around the worldItaly, Japan, Iran, India, Peru, Uganda, and Russia! In Japan, Kei plays Freeze Tag, while in Uganda, Daphine likes to jump rope. While the way they play may differ, the shared rhythm of their daysand this one world we all shareunites them. This genuine exchange provides a window into traditions that may be Follow one day in the real lives of seven kids from around the world—Italy, Japan, Iran, India, Peru, Uganda, and Russia! In Japan, Kei plays Freeze Tag, while in Uganda, Daphine likes to jump rope. While the way they play may differ, the shared rhythm of their days—and this one world we all share—unites them. This genuine exchange provides a window into traditions that may be different from our own as well as mirrors reflecting our common experiences. Inspired by his own travels, Matt Lamonthe transports readers across the globe and back with this luminous and thoughtful picture book. Perfect for kids learning about new cultures and customs Educates children on the importance of similarities and differences Gives kids a unique look into the lives of others across the globe If you enjoyed Carson Ellis' Home, you're sure to enjoy the window into the world provided by This is How We Do It. This children's picture book is ideal for parents or teachers looking for the following: World Book for Kids Travel Book for Kids Beginning Reading Books Cultures for Kids Books Families Around the World Books

30 review for This Is How We Do It: One Day in the Lives of Seven Kids from around the World (Easy Reader Books, Children Around the World Books, Preschool Prep Books)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    What a fantastic book! I loved this look into children's lives in different parts of the world. My favorites were how I spell my name and how we eat dinner. I found the differences in when people eat dinner to be interesting and it made me wonder about bedtime and waketime, neither of which was shown unfortunately. I can see this book leading to many discussions about how people live and why. The book is a good opening to conversations about our similarities and differences no matter where we What a fantastic book! I loved this look into children's lives in different parts of the world. My favorites were how I spell my name and how we eat dinner. I found the differences in when people eat dinner to be interesting and it made me wonder about bedtime and waketime, neither of which was shown unfortunately. I can see this book leading to many discussions about how people live and why. The book is a good opening to conversations about our similarities and differences no matter where we live.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Perfect for pre-K and Kindergarten and emergent readers. I love everything about this book except for the fact that the families shown are all two-heterosexual-parent families with 2-3 kids. Celebrating all the different types of nuclear families that exist in the world is not the point of the book, but it misses a real opportunity to at least show that multiple generations living under the same roof is common in many parts of the world.

  3. 4 out of 5

    paula

    I have spent years recommending What the World Eats and Material World to families for their irresistible peek into the everyday lives of families around the world. This spectacular picture book offers the same engrossing level of detail, but with an illustrator's eye. So good. Put one in every classroom. GIANT IRRESISTIBLE BONUS: photographs of all of the REAL families profiled in the book at the back. Seeing is believing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    La Coccinelle

    Before I opened this book, I saw some reviews that complained about the lack of diversity in the makeup of the families (they all have a mom and a dad). I would argue that that argument somewhat misses the point. This isn't a book where kids are supposed to see themselves reflected in what they're reading; this is a book that aims to show kids about different lives and experiences that they might not have any previous knowledge of. I didn't expect to see a lot of gay couples raising kids Before I opened this book, I saw some reviews that complained about the lack of diversity in the makeup of the families (they all have a mom and a dad). I would argue that that argument somewhat misses the point. This isn't a book where kids are supposed to see themselves reflected in what they're reading; this is a book that aims to show kids about different lives and experiences that they might not have any previous knowledge of. I didn't expect to see a lot of gay couples raising kids (especially considering being gay can land you in prison in at least one of these countries), although a single-parent family might've been a nice inclusion. Keep in mind that these are real families, so these seven just may have been some of the ones most willing to participate. That said, I wish there had been more than seven children featured, at least so the book could've covered a few more areas of the globe. Oceania isn't covered at all, and I wouldn't have minded seeing a family in the far north (Canada or Alaska). I read Children Just Like Me years ago, and really liked that glimpse into the everyday lives of kids from around the world. This book is similar, though instead of using photos, it's illustrated, and it goes through the events of a typical day, showing how each of the seven children eat, learn, play, and even sleep. I think I would've rather had photos than illustrations (I liked seeing the photos of the actual families at the end), but that's a minor complaint. There's a glossary at the back of the book that explains the unfamiliar words that are underlined in the text, which is a nice touch. Even as an adult, there are things in this book that surprised me. I had no idea that some kids eat dinner at 9 or 10 in the evening (I would've been in bed hours before that)! Seeing the different meals was one of my favourite parts of the book. I was surprised at how many kids drink water. One little kid in Peru even drank coffee! The education section was interesting, too; kids in Japan study ethics and kids in India study value education (subjects that weren't really covered at my elementary school). Aside from a weird layout problem in the glossary (one of the definitions seems to have gotten cut off, which may just be an issue with the e-book formatting), this is actually a pretty strong book. And I like the message at the end, that no matter our differences, we're all still looking up at the same night sky. This would be a great book to use in a classroom, or even just for kids who like learning about other kids around the world.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    Really cool book. I could see kids spending hours poring over the details. I love that the author included photos of the real families in the back. I didn't love that all the families were structured so similarly - 2 parent households with a mom, dad, and kids. A missed opportunity to include different types of families in an otherwise diverse book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shari

    This is a book that you can go back to again and again. Put it a text set with ALL IN A DAY by Mitsumasa Anno and THIS IS THE WAY WE GO TO SCHOOL by Edith Baer. A wonderful resource for writing and social studies.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gary Anderson

    At first I thought This Is How We Do It was going to be a little too busy and confusing. Silly me. It comes together smoothly as author Matt Lamothe charmingly shows how kids from Italy, Japan, Peru, Uganda, Russia, India, and Iran do pretty much the same things American kids do, although some of the details are different. Each activitybreakfast, going to school, playing, etc.is shown in action from other the countries, with a space on the page for American kids to reflect on their own version At first I thought This Is How We Do It was going to be a little too busy and confusing. Silly me. It comes together smoothly as author Matt Lamothe charmingly shows how kids from Italy, Japan, Peru, Uganda, Russia, India, and Iran do pretty much the same things American kids do, although some of the details are different. Each activity—breakfast, going to school, playing, etc.—is shown in action from other the countries, with a space on the page for American kids to reflect on their own version of the activity. This large picture book draws on the basic principle that much of how we learn is based on recognition of how things are the same and how things differ. This Is How We Do It can help children (and adults) understand that our lives have far more in common with our global neighbors than we are sometimes led to believe.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Olga Thompson

    I never thought I could learn so much from a childrens book! My son and I especially loved looking through pictures of all the different foods people eat around the world. This book encourages a lot of discussion and inspiration. It inspired me to cook more Russian food for my family. I never thought I could learn so much from a children’s book! My son and I especially loved looking through pictures of all the different foods people eat around the world. This book encourages a lot of discussion and inspiration. It inspired me to cook more Russian food for my family.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erin Buhr

    Follow seven kids from around the world through their day in this beautiful and diverse book. It features; Ribaldo from Peru, Romeo from Italy, Oleg from Russia, Daphine from Uganda, Kian from Iran, Ananya from India and Kei from Japan. From where they live and what they were to school to how they spell their name (my favorite page) and where they go to bed this story is simple but magical. It perfectly illustrates the fascinating differences of life around the world, but also the interesting Follow seven kids from around the world through their day in this beautiful and diverse book. It features; Ribaldo from Peru, Romeo from Italy, Oleg from Russia, Daphine from Uganda, Kian from Iran, Ananya from India and Kei from Japan. From where they live and what they were to school to how they spell their name (my favorite page) and where they go to bed this story is simple but magical. It perfectly illustrates the fascinating differences of life around the world, but also the interesting ways that we are similar. I'm so glad this one has been added to our collection because it offers something new every time we read it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Aliza Werner

    I loved pouring over the illustrations of this book and learning about cultures all over the world through the eyes of children. My one criticism is that every family represented includes both a mother and a father. I would have liked to see some diversity in the make up of each family, including a family with a single parent, a same-sex couple, an only child, or multigenerational families. That was a huge missed opportunity.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katie Dicesare

    This book will have my kids captivated and asking lots of questions. I read it with a hopefulness that it was based on the lives of real children and families and I loved seeing the photographs depicting theses families at the end. Awesome look into how we are all the same but different.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    7 kids from around the world talk about who they are, where they live, what they eat, how they get to school, what they do at school, and what they do in their free time. The illustrations have so much for kids to pore over, and the text succinctly describes their daily lives. While reading, I wondered how the authors chose these kinds of lives to write about. How much is typical? How much is stereotypical? Why choose these particular types of homes and lives? And then, right at the end, the 7 kids from around the world talk about who they are, where they live, what they eat, how they get to school, what they do at school, and what they do in their free time. The illustrations have so much for kids to pore over, and the text succinctly describes their daily lives. While reading, I wondered how the authors chose these kinds of lives to write about. How much is typical? How much is stereotypical? Why choose these particular types of homes and lives? And then, right at the end, the answers are all there in an afterword! These are all real kids and real families, describing their real lives. The authors even talk about what they were looking for: families who had lived in the same place for many generations. It got me, it made me smile and tear up, and it was a wonderful reminder that the world is so different and yet so similar. A lovely book to treasure, through and through.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    The premise of the book is great- exploring and celebrating differences. Except that from seven families, every single one includes a set of straight, cis-parents. I could have used some more diversity, but overall the kids loved it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michele Knott

    A book that celebrates our differences and shares our similarities!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Watkins

    Matt Lamothes THIS IS HOW WE DO IT is my new favorite picture book. Lamothe takes us through a day in the life of 7 children in 7 different countries examining details like what they wear to school, what they eat, and where they sleep. Use this book to highlight similarities and differences between cultures as well as launching discussions about human beings as citizens of planet Earth. Matt Lamothe’s THIS IS HOW WE DO IT is my new favorite picture book. Lamothe takes us through a day in the life of 7 children in 7 different countries examining details like what they wear to school, what they eat, and where they sleep. Use this book to highlight similarities and differences between cultures as well as launching discussions about human beings as citizens of planet Earth.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    I really liked this book. I think it's important for children to grow up understanding how different everyone can be, yet how similar at the same time. It's a very informative book that gets the point across in a way that young children can understand. It would definitely help raise children that arr respectful of different cultures . 5/5

  17. 4 out of 5

    Immy

    I absolutely loved this book. Beautifully illustrated, Lamothe takes you through a 'day in the life' of seven real children from around the world, from Italy to Uganda we see through brief quotes from these children and the gorgeous drawings how each child's life differs. From what they eat for breakfast, through to their bedrooms, Lamothe exemplifies the ways that different cultures live. To add to the beauty of this book, Lamothe has shown how each child sleeps under the same night sky. I absolutely loved this book. Beautifully illustrated, Lamothe takes you through a 'day in the life' of seven real children from around the world, from Italy to Uganda we see through brief quotes from these children and the gorgeous drawings how each child's life differs. From what they eat for breakfast, through to their bedrooms, Lamothe exemplifies the ways that different cultures live. To add to the beauty of this book, Lamothe has shown how each child sleeps under the same night sky. Reminding us that despite the differences in our lives, we all inhabit the same world. A fantastic way for children to discover other cultures and remind them that despite these differences we are all start off the same.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Brehl

    Compare Mirror (by Jeannie Baker) and this very recent release by author/illustrator Matt Lamothe, THIS IS HOW WE DO IT. Rather than explore only two families and cultures, Lamothe selects seven families from around the world to portray and label the intricacies of similarities and differences through the course of a day-in-the-life in various cultures. He doesn't attempt to weave a storyline throughout their lives. In fact, he chose to shift the positioning of each character/culture instead of Compare Mirror (by Jeannie Baker) and this very recent release by author/illustrator Matt Lamothe, THIS IS HOW WE DO IT. Rather than explore only two families and cultures, Lamothe selects seven families from around the world to portray and label the intricacies of similarities and differences through the course of a day-in-the-life in various cultures. He doesn't attempt to weave a storyline throughout their lives. In fact, he chose to shift the positioning of each character/culture instead of locking each in the same orientation on the page. The labeling is still effective and offers an oppportunity for kids to eagerly challenge themselves, turning back often to remind themselves of who is who and where they live. Endpapers do a a great job of showing just how small our world really is. Back matter provides a simple but helpful glossary (in natural, kid-friendly language) to expand on specific terminology from various scenes and cultures. The author's note explains how he was inspired to create the book and describes the complex process he used to assure authenticity for this nonfiction treasure. It's worth a read in and of itself, and the final double spread using photographs of the seven actual families should lead many young readers to explore Lamothe's final notes. I particularly appreciate these two titles for use in presenting a balanced view of kids and families in far-flung parts of the world. Some recent titles focus on refugees and immigrants. Presenting objective and realistic stories that share those harsh experiences is essential, but it's all too easy for young readers to develop a false concept: that all "others" are destitute or desperate or seeking to leave their homes. These two titles provide a healthy contradiction to that misperception. They show a variety of daily life patterns in which the children and families are comfortably settled in routines and relationships that feel familiar and safe. In fact, they make the prospect of traveling and meeting people around the world quite appealing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jamila

    I enjoyed reading this book. It is beautiful and thought-provoking. It is problematic that all of the children selected have the same parent structure: two, seemingly, cisgendered heterosexual adults. It would have been better to have at least one family with a different type of parenting structure. Diversity in family structure is important for children to understand and develop empathy around.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nadine

    This is a great book and it's beautifully illustrated and it fits in perfectly with many units of inquiry and the whole global thing. The author is at pains to say that they are 7 families and are not representative of everyone in that country. However I did feel that it would have been nice to have at least one of the families not to be a nuclear family but to show the way that many families around the world are multi-generational. I was surprised to see that both the Italian and Indian family This is a great book and it's beautifully illustrated and it fits in perfectly with many units of inquiry and the whole global thing. The author is at pains to say that they are 7 families and are not representative of everyone in that country. However I did feel that it would have been nice to have at least one of the families not to be a nuclear family but to show the way that many families around the world are multi-generational. I was surprised to see that both the Italian and Indian family didn't have at least one set of grandparents in the same villa / apartment.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I love so many aspects of this beautiful book. Its a window into seven real childrens lives: Romeo (Italy), Kei (Japan), Daphine (Uganda), Oleg (Russia), Ananya (India), Ribaldo (Peru), and Kian (Iran). In the realistic illustrations we see where they live and go to school, their family composition, what food they eat, how they play, help, and spell their name, and more. Its fascinating to see the differences and what we all have in common. I love so many aspects of this beautiful book. It’s a window into seven real children’s lives: Romeo (Italy), Kei (Japan), Daphine (Uganda), Oleg (Russia), Ananya (India), Ribaldo (Peru), and Kian (Iran). In the realistic illustrations we see where they live and go to school, their family composition, what food they eat, how they play, help, and spell their name, and more. It’s fascinating to see the differences and what we all have in common.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    A wonderful and informative peak into the lives of seven children from around the world. Transportation, schooling, home life, family members and food are all discussed in a charming and accessible way. A real treat is to see photographs of the children and their families at the end of the book. What a terrific way to expose children to other cultures.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Earl

    I'm pretty sure I read this and reviewed it so I don't know why it wasn't rated on Goodreads and mentioned on my blog. A great book for young readers to glimpse how other kids in other countries live their lives and how they go about it. And, in the differences, they also see the similarities. I enjoy pairing this with Chloe Perkin's Living In series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Piyali

    What a great way to expose young readers to the world of children living in countries around the world. It goes without saying Ananya's everyday life matched my own childhood where both carrom and the game 'rumal chor' with friends featured almost every day. :)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Adele

    I found this interesting and informative, if not quite as amazing as I had hoped. Note that in my copy a couple pages were repeated. Looks like a spread was inserted and sewn in out of order.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Yapha

    A great comparative look at the families, schools, and home lives of seven children from around the world. Based on real families, and includes their photographs at the end, as well as a glossary of potentially unfamiliar words.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    I don't usually read picture books, and if I do I don't add them to good reads. But this book was so fun and so interesting to read, I just had to add it, also so I wouldn't forget about it, cause that's what goodreads is good for.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ley

    I love this. The illustrations are beautiful.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    Great illustrated book showcasing the lives of children in 7 different countries. My kids enjoyed learning, comparing and finding similarities with their own lives.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Mangler

    This is the kind of book you need to read more than once to fully absorb. It would be a great way to spark a discussion of cultural comparison. And I LOVE the last page of the story.

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