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How to Spot the Next Starbucks, Whole Foods, Walmart, or McDonalds BEFORE Its Shares Explode

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Everyone knows the basic golden rule of investing: "Buy Low, Sell High," but how many of us ever really understand the stock market, how to recognize the "next big thing," and how to capitalize off of it once you do? ...the truth is not many or we'd all be millionaires. It seems like early investors in big companies like Facebook and Google had to have won the lottery of in Everyone knows the basic golden rule of investing: "Buy Low, Sell High," but how many of us ever really understand the stock market, how to recognize the "next big thing," and how to capitalize off of it once you do? ...the truth is not many or we'd all be millionaires. It seems like early investors in big companies like Facebook and Google had to have won the lottery of investing and just gotten really lucky, but there's more to it than that. There's a science to the "Next Big Thing" strategy, and Mark Tier understands it. In How to Spot the Next Starbucks, Whole Foods, Walmart, or McDonald's BEFORE Its Shares Explode, Tier shows readers that explosive brands like Starbucks, Whole Foods, McDonald's, and Walmart didn't become successful on accident. Through in-depth and accessible case studies, Tier pulls back the curtain on the early Key Performance Indicators that each of these major companies showed even at their earliest stages. Once you learn how to recognize these makings of success, you too will be able to spot the next Starbucks.


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Everyone knows the basic golden rule of investing: "Buy Low, Sell High," but how many of us ever really understand the stock market, how to recognize the "next big thing," and how to capitalize off of it once you do? ...the truth is not many or we'd all be millionaires. It seems like early investors in big companies like Facebook and Google had to have won the lottery of in Everyone knows the basic golden rule of investing: "Buy Low, Sell High," but how many of us ever really understand the stock market, how to recognize the "next big thing," and how to capitalize off of it once you do? ...the truth is not many or we'd all be millionaires. It seems like early investors in big companies like Facebook and Google had to have won the lottery of investing and just gotten really lucky, but there's more to it than that. There's a science to the "Next Big Thing" strategy, and Mark Tier understands it. In How to Spot the Next Starbucks, Whole Foods, Walmart, or McDonald's BEFORE Its Shares Explode, Tier shows readers that explosive brands like Starbucks, Whole Foods, McDonald's, and Walmart didn't become successful on accident. Through in-depth and accessible case studies, Tier pulls back the curtain on the early Key Performance Indicators that each of these major companies showed even at their earliest stages. Once you learn how to recognize these makings of success, you too will be able to spot the next Starbucks.

30 review for How to Spot the Next Starbucks, Whole Foods, Walmart, or McDonalds BEFORE Its Shares Explode

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elisa Panjang

    Wooo! I had fun reading this. It was nicely written, you don't feel bored. - Won in a Goodreads giveaway. Wooo! I had fun reading this. It was nicely written, you don't feel bored. - Won in a Goodreads giveaway.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James Ford

    I would have given it 2 stars because there a VERY FEW somewhat interesting sections (e.g. p. 112 Judging Management by the Numbers; the bit about intrinsic value; and the discussion about education) but when he started giving terrible advice on marijuana stocks and misquoting Warren Buffett I decided 1 star is really the only appropriate rating. The book talks ALOT about the successes of McDonalds, Starbucks, Whole Foods and Walmart (these 4 success stories are referenced throughout the book) s I would have given it 2 stars because there a VERY FEW somewhat interesting sections (e.g. p. 112 Judging Management by the Numbers; the bit about intrinsic value; and the discussion about education) but when he started giving terrible advice on marijuana stocks and misquoting Warren Buffett I decided 1 star is really the only appropriate rating. The book talks ALOT about the successes of McDonalds, Starbucks, Whole Foods and Walmart (these 4 success stories are referenced throughout the book) so if you want to read about them maybe you would enjoy this book but even at that you are probably better off with other books or even just some youtube videos instead. There is almost no mention of valuation techniques or financial analysis; instead Tier gives advice so qualitative and basic that really its not worth reading. The whole book just felt like an attempt at retirement passive income via an obnoxious title and zero substance. The author also references himself alot. I did not enjoy this book - sorry Mark.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This book has an unwieldy title that honestly doesn't do its content justice. Yes, it is an exploration of how to spot the next "big thing" before its shares explode but it is also a lot more than that. It's also a look at how successful businesses become successful, how one can leverage the ideas of successful businesses into either one's own start-up or one's own early investment opportunity (i.e. get in at the ground level as a backer of the business, well before there's an option to invest o This book has an unwieldy title that honestly doesn't do its content justice. Yes, it is an exploration of how to spot the next "big thing" before its shares explode but it is also a lot more than that. It's also a look at how successful businesses become successful, how one can leverage the ideas of successful businesses into either one's own start-up or one's own early investment opportunity (i.e. get in at the ground level as a backer of the business, well before there's an option to invest on the stock market level). Well-written and insightful, easy to follow (even in this early uncorrected version!), I would honestly recommend this book to anyone, even if you're not a stock market person. I'm not, and I enjoyed this tremendously, for the history of these companies particularly, but also as a look at the process of how to spot a successful stock investment--it demystifies a lot of what makes a "good" stock, which is a big deal.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Radina

    The book was highly recommended to me, so I approached it with much curiosity despite the clickbait title. It turned out to be a pop culture business book for non-majors. You won't find any technical analysis at all, as the author does not have a finance background. You will, however, find a historic account and anecdotes about the growth and expansion of said companies. The book was highly recommended to me, so I approached it with much curiosity despite the clickbait title. It turned out to be a pop culture business book for non-majors. You won't find any technical analysis at all, as the author does not have a finance background. You will, however, find a historic account and anecdotes about the growth and expansion of said companies.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Turner

    Very informative read and one that I will surely use when making future investments. This book was well thought though and shows a lot of investigation is needed before one invests in these types of ventures. I recommend highly.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    Despite such a clickbait title, it’s a actually a great book to learn how retailers and franchisers grow and expand their businesses. Explained with charts and tables, helps people gain intuition, title is overly suggestive as it sounds, author is much more realistic than that.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Romrik Joshua

    Very insightful book

  8. 5 out of 5

    CAPTAINPIG

    Good read if you want to know about food business and franchises

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shin Shin

    Title should be changed to Rambling of F&B businesses

  10. 4 out of 5

    hemlet kiai

    an interesting reading.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anandh Sundar

    the book does what it promises-examples of growth stocks and a contrast of those who succeeded versus those who failed. if it had given a predictive examples it would have earned a 5 but good read

  12. 5 out of 5

    Snowleopard

  13. 5 out of 5

    MD Chan

  14. 5 out of 5

    p

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cecil Cruz

    Most businesses are good but not all of them are great. In this book, the author tells you the 5 clues that separate those good businesses from the great ones in the most entertaining way! A great read for those who are into investing or entrepreneurship (or both!) You'll certainly get your money's worth for having a well-written and comprehensive book that hits two birds with one stone. I just started my business a few months ago and this book has helped me in so many ways. It has served as a g Most businesses are good but not all of them are great. In this book, the author tells you the 5 clues that separate those good businesses from the great ones in the most entertaining way! A great read for those who are into investing or entrepreneurship (or both!) You'll certainly get your money's worth for having a well-written and comprehensive book that hits two birds with one stone. I just started my business a few months ago and this book has helped me in so many ways. It has served as a guide/manual for me in building my own business - from creating the mission/vision statements to delivering great customer experience. It has everything you need in creating the next Starbucks, McDonald's, Walmart, or Whole Foods!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

  17. 4 out of 5

    Johnny POH

  18. 4 out of 5

    JL

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pete Apple

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vishal

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Rivers

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bernard Teo

  23. 5 out of 5

    Phil

  24. 5 out of 5

    Malin Nilstoft

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bernie Chan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

  27. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jerome Oaf

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matt

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