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Midnighter: The Complete Wildstorm Series

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Written by Garth Ennis (PREACHER), Keith Giffen (JUSTICE LEAGUE INTERNATIONAL), Brian K. Vaughan (Y: THE LAST MAN) and others, with art by Chris Sprouse (TOM STRONG), Karl Story (NIGHTWING) and others including Glenn Fabry (THE AUTHORITY: KEV), John Paul Leon (Earth X) and Darick Robertson (TRANSMETROPOLITAN) comes a complete collection of Midnighter tales in MIDNIGHTER: T Written by Garth Ennis (PREACHER), Keith Giffen (JUSTICE LEAGUE INTERNATIONAL), Brian K. Vaughan (Y: THE LAST MAN) and others, with art by Chris Sprouse (TOM STRONG), Karl Story (NIGHTWING) and others including Glenn Fabry (THE AUTHORITY: KEV), John Paul Leon (Earth X) and Darick Robertson (TRANSMETROPOLITAN) comes a complete collection of Midnighter tales in MIDNIGHTER: THE COMPLETE WILDSTORM SERIES. The Midnighter is the most dangerous man on the planet--able to plan a fight a million moves ahead, capable of killing ruthlessly, relentlessly and without remorse. Fed up with his teammates in the Authority (including his husband, Apollo) and their lost mission of saving the world from itself, Midnighter strikes out on his own. Despite possessing superhuman abilities to see every move his opponents will make, Midnighter can't see what's ahead for himself. He's blackmailed into assassinating Hitler before the start of World War II; he's given a chance to find out about his past, before he became a superhuman killing machine; and he's hunted by an assassin with unlimited means. He's the Midnighter, what soldiers dream of becoming--what children see when they first imagine what death is like. This collection includes the entire WildStorm series, MIDNIGHTER #1-20 and MIDNIGHTER: ARMAGEDDON #1!


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Written by Garth Ennis (PREACHER), Keith Giffen (JUSTICE LEAGUE INTERNATIONAL), Brian K. Vaughan (Y: THE LAST MAN) and others, with art by Chris Sprouse (TOM STRONG), Karl Story (NIGHTWING) and others including Glenn Fabry (THE AUTHORITY: KEV), John Paul Leon (Earth X) and Darick Robertson (TRANSMETROPOLITAN) comes a complete collection of Midnighter tales in MIDNIGHTER: T Written by Garth Ennis (PREACHER), Keith Giffen (JUSTICE LEAGUE INTERNATIONAL), Brian K. Vaughan (Y: THE LAST MAN) and others, with art by Chris Sprouse (TOM STRONG), Karl Story (NIGHTWING) and others including Glenn Fabry (THE AUTHORITY: KEV), John Paul Leon (Earth X) and Darick Robertson (TRANSMETROPOLITAN) comes a complete collection of Midnighter tales in MIDNIGHTER: THE COMPLETE WILDSTORM SERIES. The Midnighter is the most dangerous man on the planet--able to plan a fight a million moves ahead, capable of killing ruthlessly, relentlessly and without remorse. Fed up with his teammates in the Authority (including his husband, Apollo) and their lost mission of saving the world from itself, Midnighter strikes out on his own. Despite possessing superhuman abilities to see every move his opponents will make, Midnighter can't see what's ahead for himself. He's blackmailed into assassinating Hitler before the start of World War II; he's given a chance to find out about his past, before he became a superhuman killing machine; and he's hunted by an assassin with unlimited means. He's the Midnighter, what soldiers dream of becoming--what children see when they first imagine what death is like. This collection includes the entire WildStorm series, MIDNIGHTER #1-20 and MIDNIGHTER: ARMAGEDDON #1!

30 review for Midnighter: The Complete Wildstorm Series

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Could basically be called Legends of Midnighter as the creative team rotates between each arc with only Keith Giffen and Cristos Gage contributing more than one story. The Wildstorm version of Midnighter is much more violent than the new 52 version. He punches through someone's head as if it's something he does regularly. I also prefer how his sexuality is handled in this book. Yes, he's gay, but the entire book doesn't focus on his sexuality like the new 52 version. Gay or straight, I don't car Could basically be called Legends of Midnighter as the creative team rotates between each arc with only Keith Giffen and Cristos Gage contributing more than one story. The Wildstorm version of Midnighter is much more violent than the new 52 version. He punches through someone's head as if it's something he does regularly. I also prefer how his sexuality is handled in this book. Yes, he's gay, but the entire book doesn't focus on his sexuality like the new 52 version. Gay or straight, I don't care much about your sexuality and don't need it thrown in my face every third page. Just get on with the superheroics. The Good: Garth Ennis and Chris Sprouse's opening story is the best in the book. Midnighter gets forced into going back in time to kill Hitler and so has to fight Nazis and time cops. The Bad: I typically like Keith Giffen but his stories were terrible and didn't make much sense. The Ugly: There's no character advancement in these stories. It's just Midnighter ripping folks apart for the most part. Take it for what you will.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    To check out my reviews: https://dancinginth3dark.wordpress.co... Who is Midnighter? How did he get his powers? Who was he before he became this monster? These are questions still left unanswered after reading this massive collection. It is the sole reason why it is not 5 stars material because I love to know about a character's backstory. Also the main reason why I checked this graphic novel out of the library for the simple fact that he is gay and I wanted more gay action and it barely scratche To check out my reviews: https://dancinginth3dark.wordpress.co... Who is Midnighter? How did he get his powers? Who was he before he became this monster? These are questions still left unanswered after reading this massive collection. It is the sole reason why it is not 5 stars material because I love to know about a character's backstory. Also the main reason why I checked this graphic novel out of the library for the simple fact that he is gay and I wanted more gay action and it barely scratched the surface. Midnighter is this vigilante who has the ability to see the future in terms of fighting. What I mean is if someone decides to attack him, he is able to see their moves in advance and knows how to counterattack. He has super strength and nano technology in his system so if he gets injured he's practically instantly healed in a matter of seconds. Through this graphic novel we get to see difficult situations that arises either by enemies who seek havoc on Earth or drama within his own family. He is married to Apollo and I love the chemistry between these two characters. While the gay action is not extremely apparent, there are moments where we get to see them kiss and make out. My favorite storyline out of the entire magnum opus is Hitler time travel. Midnighter gets kidnapped one day and his kidnapper proposes the idea of him going back in time to kill Hitler and prevent the Holocaust. His parents died in the concentration camps and wishes that to never happened. Simple request right? Oh I forgot if Midnighter does not accomplish this task, he's injected a bomb inside him and it will detonate and obliterate him. So Midnighter participates in this experience and gets sucked into the middle of a battle in WWI and discovers a young soldier who is Adolf Hitler. He's close to killing him when this group of time travel police interrupt him. He fails to kill to Hitler but discovers a valuable lesson about history and why you shouldn't mess with time even though you would be saving million of lives from a mad man. Midnighter is a hero but at the same time I would say he is not the classic definition of what it means to be a superhero. His brooding behavior reminds me of Batman except he has special abilities. With these abilities come major consequences and we see the toll it takes especially on his identity. Theres one storyline that deals with his past and if granted the chance to discover your past life and maybe remember it would you accept this information? We get close to finding the juicy details about his life and yet the road is so far towards actually knowing what happen to him before he became this monster. The illustrations are phenomenal and even though this series was written years ago I felt major relevance especially the Anthem storyline. Especially with who is governing our country it doesn't surprised me if the sad day comes where we would hired organizations to "protect" our cities in exchange of our liberties getting taken away. If you want to read a comic book that caters to the Batman and Superman gay fantasy then I highly recommend picking up this comic.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Benji Glaab

    This was decent all around. The first arc written by Garth Ennis was the most entertaining of the lot. I was under the impression Ennis handled the entire story, and was a little dissapointed, the last 1/2 dragged. This year I've been on a Wildstorm Kick with Warren Ellis reviving the world. I've only scratched the surface in the universe but you can expect some ultra violence, and adult themes. The art is a cut above what was being produced in the early 2000's also. I found it interesting to se This was decent all around. The first arc written by Garth Ennis was the most entertaining of the lot. I was under the impression Ennis handled the entire story, and was a little dissapointed, the last 1/2 dragged. This year I've been on a Wildstorm Kick with Warren Ellis reviving the world. I've only scratched the surface in the universe but you can expect some ultra violence, and adult themes. The art is a cut above what was being produced in the early 2000's also. I found it interesting to see how the books of that decade have there own distinct look. How far the industry is ever evolving is impressive. I would consider reading some more Wildstorm in the future, will have to wait till the library opens the doors again though :/

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Midnighter is a killing machine generally doing away with "bad" people/aliens/etc. Interesting power with some of the tales quite innovative. Others are meh. MY GRADE: B to B plus. Midnighter is a killing machine generally doing away with "bad" people/aliens/etc. Interesting power with some of the tales quite innovative. Others are meh. MY GRADE: B to B plus.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Killing Machine (#1-5). Garth Ennis' first Midnighter arc is an amazing story where he's blackmailed to go back in time to kill Hitler. What a great premise, and Ennis just goes from there with time cops and the inevitable revenge. This is Ennis at his best, creating amazing high-concept stories. He's not afraid to detail gruesome violence, but this doesn't go overboard into sex and violence like his worst [5/5]. Flowers for the Sun (#6). An alternate reality story that is almost poetic, but almo Killing Machine (#1-5). Garth Ennis' first Midnighter arc is an amazing story where he's blackmailed to go back in time to kill Hitler. What a great premise, and Ennis just goes from there with time cops and the inevitable revenge. This is Ennis at his best, creating amazing high-concept stories. He's not afraid to detail gruesome violence, but this doesn't go overboard into sex and violence like his worst [5/5]. Flowers for the Sun (#6). An alternate reality story that is almost poetic, but almost pointless as well. Ennis' swan song [3+/5]. Fact Accompli (#7). Yeah, there's sort of a reason for Brian Vaughan telling this story backward, and it's got a few fun bits, but there's really no depth here [3/5]. Ordinary People (#8). Gage writes a one-off about Midnighter looking for a lost cat. It's kind of cute and goes in cute of funny weird directions, but it's another one that's kind of pointless too [3+/5]. The Hercules Virus (#9). These one-offs weren't doing the series any favors. This one is a long shaggy dog story that spends way too much time on dull zombies before it gets to the point as it were [2/5]. Anthem (10-15). New author Keith Giffen takes over, and fortunately gets Midnighter back on its feet after four rampling and mediocre issues. This arc has a great premise: who did the Midnighter used to be? It also has a plot that feels positively Authority-like, as we meet a corporation bent on sowing fear and hate into the populace, so that they can then step in and protect them from the heroes that they've demonized. The visuals make this even creepier with a bunch of (literally) faceless adversaries. The arc is at its best when Midnighter is fighting these forces in his "old home town" ... and its a lot weaker when the fight moves out of that concrete, personal environment into the home base of the enemy. Overall, though, it's an arc that really feels like it fits into the rest of the Wildstorm universe [4/5]. A Failed World (M:A). Well this is a curious issue, apparently part of a larger "Amageddon" event. It's a nice enough visit to a near future that the heroes must then prevent, an old trope, but it doesn't go anywhere within this volume ... [4/5]. Assasin8 (16-20). The final Midnighter arc is sadly the weakest. It's mostly a long fight against a super-assassin, but beyond that feels opaque and inconclusive [3+/5].

  6. 5 out of 5

    Graeme Dunlop

    Hmm. Not sure what to rate this one coz it's a really mixed bag. The first stories by Garth Ennis are too much like The Boys -- it's like Ennis simply replaced Billy Butcher with The Midnighter. His second arc, where The Midnighter and Apollo are samurai in ancient Japan is better. Most of the other stories are pretty disposable. But I really liked Keith Giffen's story arc -- the longest in the book -- which explores whether you can go home again and what happens if you do. It gives The Midnighte Hmm. Not sure what to rate this one coz it's a really mixed bag. The first stories by Garth Ennis are too much like The Boys -- it's like Ennis simply replaced Billy Butcher with The Midnighter. His second arc, where The Midnighter and Apollo are samurai in ancient Japan is better. Most of the other stories are pretty disposable. But I really liked Keith Giffen's story arc -- the longest in the book -- which explores whether you can go home again and what happens if you do. It gives The Midnighter a chance to explore his past before he became what he is, and try on a normal life for size. Too bad there's a corporation called Anthem who effectively own the town which is "policed" by a bunch of creepy guys and gals who wear an American flag on their face. They say you can't go home again, and maybe it's true. Or is it? On the artwork, I really don't like Chris Sprouse's renderings. They make The Midnighter look too benign. This surprised the hell out of me as Sprouse is co-creator of Tom Strong (with Alan Moore) and I love that book, especially the ones penned by Moore himself. I think the artwork is a little too neat, too tidy for The Midnighter. He heeds to look more feral, more threatening, more insane. Look at the drawings done by ACO for the Steve Orlando Midnighter series -- that's what I'm talking about :) The Midnighter is a great character -- Batman unchained -- and for mine, only Keith Giffen gives us a good look at him.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    Boom, Now this is what I needed in my current low of reading DC Rebirth titles. Damn. I love Midnighter, but my only exposure to him had been through the DCYou run and the Midnighter and Apollo run that happened alongside Rebirth. Although this is branded under the DC imprint, the stories in this pre-date their acquisition of Wildstorm. This offered me a new and unique view on his first solo run and I just frigging loved it. He's certainly different than the more recent take on him, but not differe Boom, Now this is what I needed in my current low of reading DC Rebirth titles. Damn. I love Midnighter, but my only exposure to him had been through the DCYou run and the Midnighter and Apollo run that happened alongside Rebirth. Although this is branded under the DC imprint, the stories in this pre-date their acquisition of Wildstorm. This offered me a new and unique view on his first solo run and I just frigging loved it. He's certainly different than the more recent take on him, but not different enough to make me take pause and reconsider how much I love him. He's hitting the same beats in this in terms of character and style, but with the added pressure of being and adoptive father. Also, one minor difference for me was that in the more recent run some folks referred to him as a "gay Batman" archetype. In this, it feels more like he's a grizzled, dry, and all too worldly and weary gay Wolverine. I didn't know I needed that in my life, but am damn happy I found it. For me, all the stories are very enjoyable. Some of the one-offs outside of the two main arcs are in the "okay" category, such as the one set in Feudal Japan, but the other highlights pick up the slack where this one left me a bit down. Anyways, won't be for everyone, but this was top shelf stuff for me!

  8. 4 out of 5

    RG

    Really didn't like this all that much. Liked the beginning but it felt all over the shop. Didnt really have a great linear story. Felt like a bunch of random stories that just disnt excite me all that much. Really didn't like this all that much. Liked the beginning but it felt all over the shop. Didnt really have a great linear story. Felt like a bunch of random stories that just disnt excite me all that much.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gabriell Anderson

    Midnightera jsem znal čistě z jeho působení v Authority a nic sólového jsem až do teď nezkoušel. Takže co jiného si dát jako rozjezd než Midnighterovy sebrané spisy. Tedy spíš mix Midnighterových příběhů od různých autorů a různorodých kvalit. Prakticky tu máme tři delší story arcy a čtyři kratší příběhy. A je to víceméně první půl knížky, které to drží nad vodou a navnadili mě dorazit to komplet. První arc si totiž střihnul Ennis a je radost to číst. Tedy pokud máte rádi Ennise. Cestuje se tu č Midnightera jsem znal čistě z jeho působení v Authority a nic sólového jsem až do teď nezkoušel. Takže co jiného si dát jako rozjezd než Midnighterovy sebrané spisy. Tedy spíš mix Midnighterových příběhů od různých autorů a různorodých kvalit. Prakticky tu máme tři delší story arcy a čtyři kratší příběhy. A je to víceméně první půl knížky, které to drží nad vodou a navnadili mě dorazit to komplet. První arc si totiž střihnul Ennis a je radost to číst. Tedy pokud máte rádi Ennise. Cestuje se tu časem, je tu dostatek šíleného násilí a noha je na plynu prakticky od začátku. Následují čtyři krátké příběhy, z nichž za mě osobně nejvíce vynikl ten od Briana K. Vaughana, který se odehrává pozpátku. Následující dva arcy od Keitha Giffena jsou to, co za mě táhne tuhle sérii do vod průměru. Ne, že by byly špatné, ale originální myšlenku, aby v nich člověk pohledal. Řeší se tu Midnighterova identita (protože z toho, že má vygumovanou paměť má prý deprese), je tu zase jednou organizace, která chce chránit svět před superhrdiny výměnou za nadvládu na světem a celkově všechny nápady, co se tu objeví mi přijdou až zoufale okopírované odjinud. Nevytrhne to ani poslední arc s tajemným zabijákem a já osobně už to do konce tak nějak prozíval. Co je sérii možno přičíst k dobru je zobrazování homosexuality. Midnighter je gay a nikdo tady z toho nedělá jeho hlavní povahový rys, ani se to vlastně nijak víc nerozpitvává a bere se to jako normální věc. Člověku se po tomhle až i zasteskne, když tak čte některé dnešní věci. Na kreslířské sesli se tu také vystřídalo požehnaně jmen, ale abych pravdu řekl, nikdo z nich mě ani nezaujal, ani nenaštval tak moc, abych ho potřeboval vypíchnout. Mohlo by se vám líbit, pokud: - máte chuť na superhrdinu, který rád řeší problémy tím, že někomu prostě ukopne hlavu - chcete komiks s gay hrdinou, který zároveň není LGBT agitkou Spíš vás zklame, pokud: - nemáte rádi Ennise (protože ten píše tu lepší část) - nechcete sbírku, která se v druhé půlce zvrhne v rozcvičku neoriginality

  10. 4 out of 5

    John

    Midnighter is one of those characters, that like Moon Knight can celebrate the excesses, decadantness and "exploitation" of pure comics. They're better characters than say, Deadpool. They're beautiful bastards. A weird attempt to fluff out a character; it seemed the series did not have a coherent enough of a mission statement. In some ways, it feels like a Warren Ellis run (it fits because Ellis created the character) since there a lot of "one-off" mission/issues. A rarity in this decompressed e Midnighter is one of those characters, that like Moon Knight can celebrate the excesses, decadantness and "exploitation" of pure comics. They're better characters than say, Deadpool. They're beautiful bastards. A weird attempt to fluff out a character; it seemed the series did not have a coherent enough of a mission statement. In some ways, it feels like a Warren Ellis run (it fits because Ellis created the character) since there a lot of "one-off" mission/issues. A rarity in this decompressed era, unfortunately. That being said, this has some killer teams on it; Ennis, BKV, Giffen, Gage, etc. The art is pretty good to boot; Sprouse, Glenn Fabry, and John Paul Leon. While as fun as this is; it seems to run out of steam pretty fast--no one seemed to have anything interesting to say. The character often has the best scenes in the Authority and what not. Ellis left pretty quickly and Giffen (who really wanted to write the Authority) gave it a shot. The character has a 12-issue run in 2015, and then a Midnighter/Apollo mini-afterwards (by Steve Orlando).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Yani

    This is interesting, but odd. Having only read the Midnighter solo book that comes after this, I found this one much more confusing as it relies a hell of a lot more on knowledge of the preceding Authority comics to know who people are, what their relationships are and what is going on at certain points. Also, with the exception of one story, the focus is much less on Midnighter's sexuality (which is one of the things that I loved about the later books). It's much more incidental here, although it This is interesting, but odd. Having only read the Midnighter solo book that comes after this, I found this one much more confusing as it relies a hell of a lot more on knowledge of the preceding Authority comics to know who people are, what their relationships are and what is going on at certain points. Also, with the exception of one story, the focus is much less on Midnighter's sexuality (which is one of the things that I loved about the later books). It's much more incidental here, although it is mentioned a number of times. There are also a couple of stories here that were repeated in the later books. The art style changes constantly, so there were sections I liked more than others, and the writing is good, although as mentioned, sometimes confusing just because I lack the history of the other characters. All things considered (especially the thickness of the book and that it's all the stories in one volume), it was worth getting.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scott Waldie

    One of Garth Ennis' most underrated runs, truly splinters off the feel of The Authority into a solo book full of bonkers enemies and Midnighter ruthlessness, I also like that it tackles his 'presumed' identity and origins. He's my favorite LGBT character in comics for a reason, because even though his sexuality can be flung about as an insult by some of his more bigoted or crude enemies, it is not the entire core of his identity, it is not worn as a 'ME TOO badge' like it would be in a lot of sh One of Garth Ennis' most underrated runs, truly splinters off the feel of The Authority into a solo book full of bonkers enemies and Midnighter ruthlessness, I also like that it tackles his 'presumed' identity and origins. He's my favorite LGBT character in comics for a reason, because even though his sexuality can be flung about as an insult by some of his more bigoted or crude enemies, it is not the entire core of his identity, it is not worn as a 'ME TOO badge' like it would be in a lot of shallower, modern books (looking at you, Marvel). His 'opposites attract' relationship with Apollo is presented believably and tastefully, which has always created a great contrast against his brutality in combat. And, yes, you get to see him kick off a number of heads :D Awesome stuff, with great art, mandatory if you like Ellis' Authority.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mery ✨

    3/5 A really good series, though it gets annoying when half of the main character's dialog is explaining that he's gay. Midnighter is a conflicted individual with a dark past and a twisted love of violence. He is essentially irredeemable, yet is willing to cross the lines that better men will not. To reiterate, Midnighter is great, but a few of the issues have terrible dialog since again half the time all he's doing is informing the audience that he's gay despite the fact that everyone knows that 3/5 A really good series, though it gets annoying when half of the main character's dialog is explaining that he's gay. Midnighter is a conflicted individual with a dark past and a twisted love of violence. He is essentially irredeemable, yet is willing to cross the lines that better men will not. To reiterate, Midnighter is great, but a few of the issues have terrible dialog since again half the time all he's doing is informing the audience that he's gay despite the fact that everyone knows that already. There is also a weird problem where one of the issues in the omnibus was backward, not a huge issue, but really annoying since I got the digital version.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jerrad

    My new favorite DC character (sorry Batman). Why DC hasn't promoted this character very much is beyond me. I love this graphic novel; it hit all my nerd spots. It's got aliens, going back in time to kill Hitler, saving little girls kittens, zombies in space, and robot dogs. This is the good shit. It's written by Ennis (Preacher) and Vaughn (Y the last Man, Saga, everything else popular from Vertigo) so it's well structured and really funny (and violent). It's 500 pages so it'll last you a while. My new favorite DC character (sorry Batman). Why DC hasn't promoted this character very much is beyond me. I love this graphic novel; it hit all my nerd spots. It's got aliens, going back in time to kill Hitler, saving little girls kittens, zombies in space, and robot dogs. This is the good shit. It's written by Ennis (Preacher) and Vaughn (Y the last Man, Saga, everything else popular from Vertigo) so it's well structured and really funny (and violent). It's 500 pages so it'll last you a while.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I first read a story about the Midnighter in the Grayson series. I liked him and thought he was an interesting supporting character. When I found an original run featuring him, I knew I wanted to read it. Midnighter goes from attempting to assassinate Hitler to trying to lead a normal life and everything in between. Midnighter is a complicated character, but I enjoy his exploits. The writers make him an interesting character who can be very human one moment and sadistic the next. Overall a good I first read a story about the Midnighter in the Grayson series. I liked him and thought he was an interesting supporting character. When I found an original run featuring him, I knew I wanted to read it. Midnighter goes from attempting to assassinate Hitler to trying to lead a normal life and everything in between. Midnighter is a complicated character, but I enjoy his exploits. The writers make him an interesting character who can be very human one moment and sadistic the next. Overall a good read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elliott Frank

    Midnighter is a character that Ennis is well suited to write. This book had a time and place, and I'm sure I would have enjoyed it more if I had read it in issues as it was being released. Ennis's palpable disdain for mainstream comics is less central than in much of his output for major publishers, and his psuedo-edgelord tendencies are dialed back a bit –which honestly is for the best given that the book is somewhat dated. Midnighter is a character that Ennis is well suited to write. This book had a time and place, and I'm sure I would have enjoyed it more if I had read it in issues as it was being released. Ennis's palpable disdain for mainstream comics is less central than in much of his output for major publishers, and his psuedo-edgelord tendencies are dialed back a bit –which honestly is for the best given that the book is somewhat dated.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ansate

    Am I more likely to check out a comic that I much larger when I have a limited number of checkouts? YES[return][return]I got it for the Brian K Vaughn issue which is the bassackwards one that I hated. So. Thanks Keith Giffen for making the rest of it readable.

  18. 4 out of 5

    J.

    This is all over the place. There are plenty of interesting ideas here, but each writer is going a different direction and no one ever spends time on character development. Lots of potential, but not particularly interesting.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Burley

    Entertaining enough. The Midnighter will never be a favourite character of mine but he is a genuine badass.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    2.5

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eddie Cichoracki

    This is amazing! The first gay superhero comic book I read and it was a fabulous experience.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    “Killing Machine” by Garth Ennis is brilliant. He defines Midnighter to his core, while giving him an amazing story where he’s blackmailed to go back in time and kill Hitler. Great premise, right? This story has surprisingly deep themes and, being written by Ennis, top notch storytelling and dialogue with a few great twists. Plus it’s right in Ennis’ wheelhouse as a war comic. Sadly, the rest of the stories don’t measure up to that one. Keith Giffen pens half the issues in the collection, and his “Killing Machine” by Garth Ennis is brilliant. He defines Midnighter to his core, while giving him an amazing story where he’s blackmailed to go back in time and kill Hitler. Great premise, right? This story has surprisingly deep themes and, being written by Ennis, top notch storytelling and dialogue with a few great twists. Plus it’s right in Ennis’ wheelhouse as a war comic. Sadly, the rest of the stories don’t measure up to that one. Keith Giffen pens half the issues in the collection, and his two arcs are merely okay. They tend to drag and feature some clunky storytelling. I like the standalones better, particularly Brian K. Vaughan’s backwards issue and Ennis’ ronin Midnighter tale. Overall, I’d say the first seven issues (Ennis and Vaughan) are worth reading but you can skip the rest.

  23. 4 out of 5

    A

    Classic Ennis. Heavy on the gore and Nazi's. As always he's entertaining but not exactly heavy on the deep character based development. I never regret picking up his stuff, he's good at what he does but it's never going to make it to my favorite lists either. I really loved this art though. It was slick and vibrant. Classic Ennis. Heavy on the gore and Nazi's. As always he's entertaining but not exactly heavy on the deep character based development. I never regret picking up his stuff, he's good at what he does but it's never going to make it to my favorite lists either. I really loved this art though. It was slick and vibrant.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Robinson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Theaker

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cem

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mary Bartel

  28. 4 out of 5

    Linda O

  29. 5 out of 5

    James

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sean

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