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Jane and the Man of the Cloth

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For everyone who loves Jane Austen...the second tantalizing mystery in a new series that transforms the beloved author into a dazzling sleuth! Jane and her family are looking forward to a peaceful holiday in the seaside village of Lyme Regis. Yet on the outskirts of town an overturned carriage forces the shaken travelers to take refuge at a nearby manor house. And it is the For everyone who loves Jane Austen...the second tantalizing mystery in a new series that transforms the beloved author into a dazzling sleuth! Jane and her family are looking forward to a peaceful holiday in the seaside village of Lyme Regis. Yet on the outskirts of town an overturned carriage forces the shaken travelers to take refuge at a nearby manor house. And it is there that Jane meets the darkly forbidding yet strangely attractive Mr. Geoffrey Sidmouth. What murky secrets does the brooding Mr. Sidmouth seek to hide? Jane suspects the worst—but her attention is swiftly diverted when a man is discovered hanged from a makeshift gibbet by the sea. The worthies of Lyme are certain his death is the work of "the Reverend," the ringleader of the midnight smuggling trade whose identity is the town's paramount mystery. Now, it falls to Jane to entrap and expose the notorious Reverend...even if the evidence points to the last person on earth she wants to suspect...a man who already may have won her heart.


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For everyone who loves Jane Austen...the second tantalizing mystery in a new series that transforms the beloved author into a dazzling sleuth! Jane and her family are looking forward to a peaceful holiday in the seaside village of Lyme Regis. Yet on the outskirts of town an overturned carriage forces the shaken travelers to take refuge at a nearby manor house. And it is the For everyone who loves Jane Austen...the second tantalizing mystery in a new series that transforms the beloved author into a dazzling sleuth! Jane and her family are looking forward to a peaceful holiday in the seaside village of Lyme Regis. Yet on the outskirts of town an overturned carriage forces the shaken travelers to take refuge at a nearby manor house. And it is there that Jane meets the darkly forbidding yet strangely attractive Mr. Geoffrey Sidmouth. What murky secrets does the brooding Mr. Sidmouth seek to hide? Jane suspects the worst—but her attention is swiftly diverted when a man is discovered hanged from a makeshift gibbet by the sea. The worthies of Lyme are certain his death is the work of "the Reverend," the ringleader of the midnight smuggling trade whose identity is the town's paramount mystery. Now, it falls to Jane to entrap and expose the notorious Reverend...even if the evidence points to the last person on earth she wants to suspect...a man who already may have won her heart.

30 review for Jane and the Man of the Cloth

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Adoro questa serie mystery classici! La vita di Jane Austen ,presentata con dovizia di particolari,si incastra perfettamente con le vicende narrate tanto da far credere che la nostra cara Jane potesse davvero essere un'astuta investigatrice al servizio della Corona. Le descrizioni di abiti ed ornamenti nonché quelle di ambienti frequentati dai protagonisti e delle loro abitudini rispettano quello che era il 1800 inglese; inoltre le vicende narrate si incastrano perfettamente con quello che è il c Adoro questa serie mystery classici! La vita di Jane Austen ,presentata con dovizia di particolari,si incastra perfettamente con le vicende narrate tanto da far credere che la nostra cara Jane potesse davvero essere un'astuta investigatrice al servizio della Corona. Le descrizioni di abiti ed ornamenti nonché quelle di ambienti frequentati dai protagonisti e delle loro abitudini rispettano quello che era il 1800 inglese; inoltre le vicende narrate si incastrano perfettamente con quello che è il contesto storico in cui sono ambientate e ci sono continui e pertinenti riferimenti storici che rendono il racconto assai piacevole e credibile. La storia è intrigante,incalzante e per niente scontata. Non mancano colpi di scena e nulla è lasciato al caso: ogni dettaglio,indizio e informazione acquisita nel corso della lettura verrà alla fine spiegata e ci ricondurrà alla soluzione del caso. Non mancano nemmeno pettegolezzi,corteggiamenti più o meno velati e quel poco di romanticismo che basta per far arrossire una gentildonna di quell'epoca.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Despite my love for historical details, the mystery itself was terribly slow.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    Beside the great mystery and historical detail, Barron has a wicked sense of humor Manners meet mayhem again in the second Being a Jane Austen Mystery, Jane and the Man of the Cloth. It is 1804 and Jane and her family are traveling by post chaise to Lyme Regis on the Dorset coast to escape the oppressive summer heat in Bath when their carriage is overturned and Jane’s sister Cassandra injured. Seeking help at a local estate, Jane and her family take refuge at High Down Grange and are thrown into Beside the great mystery and historical detail, Barron has a wicked sense of humor Manners meet mayhem again in the second Being a Jane Austen Mystery, Jane and the Man of the Cloth. It is 1804 and Jane and her family are traveling by post chaise to Lyme Regis on the Dorset coast to escape the oppressive summer heat in Bath when their carriage is overturned and Jane’s sister Cassandra injured. Seeking help at a local estate, Jane and her family take refuge at High Down Grange and are thrown into the care of its mysterious owner Geoffrey Sidmouth and his beautiful young cousin Seraphine LeFevre. The manor house and its owner have enough of an oddness about them that our observant Jane thinks something amiss. With Cassandra on the mend they arrive at their rented cottage at Lyme and are shortly joined by Jane’s brother Henry and wife Eliza. After a walk on the Cobb Jane witnesses a heated exchange between Mr. Sidmouth and a local worker. The next day the man is found dead, bound hand and foot, swinging from a makeshift gibbet at the end of the Cobb. Intrigued, Jane seeks out the best source of information that a young lady of her gentility can garner: the mercantile shop and the weekly Assembly Dance. There the local gossip from Mrs. Barnewall, the Crawfords, Lucy Armstrong and the dashing naval officer Captain Percival Fielding inform Jane that Mr. Sidmouth is much more than the enigmatic romantic figure that she has suspected. Deep into the Napoleonic Wars, the Dorset coast is a hotbed of smuggling, spies and espionage whose ringleader, the notorious “Reverend,” or the “Man of the Cloth,” is known to favor fine silks in his nighttime free trade. Jane is conflicted over her feelings for Mr. Sidmouth and the fact that Captain Fielding claims he is the culprit. When Fielding is found murdered and Sidmouth arrested, Jane is asked by the local authorities to aid in the investigation setting her on the path of intrigue and danger. This is my second novel in the Being a Jane Austen Mystery series. It was another delight. Barron in known for interlacing known facts from Jane Austen’s life into her plots. This period of history for Jane is a bit of a mystery. There are very few letters remaining and only family lore alluding to her unfortunate love affair with a clergyman that she met on a seaside holiday who later died. This “nameless and dateless” romance leaves lots of room for speculation and opens up the possibilities of a great mystery plot which Barron uses to her advantage. Our Jane is much more adventurous and daring in this narrative, sneaking out at night and investigating caves. We do get our share of Assembly Balls, frocks and finery, but the action was occasionally outside what gentile ladies are usually allowed to do, and at times I thought is a bit unbelievable – almost Jane Austen/Nancy Drew. The historical detail always brought me back into focus and I especially enjoyed the footnotes, though I understand they annoy some readers. I found myself laughing out loud, when I fear I should not, when Jane is introduced to High Down Grange with its dark, unkempt and unwomanly appearance and its present broody owner Mr. Sidmouth with his snarling dogs Fang and Beelzebub. Evoking memories of Bronte heroes, either my brain has been addled by too much historical romance reading, or Stephanie Barron has a wicked sense of humor! Laurel Ann, Austenprose

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Jane and the Man of the Cloth by Stephanie Barron is a 1997 Crimeline publication. This second book in the Jane Austen mystery series charged from the gate, when an accident leaves Jane’s sister Cassandra badly injured. But, the momentum was quickly doused with too much wordy dialogue that filled pages, but left me wondering when Jane was ever going to start working on the mystery. Eventually, the pieces began to fall into place, but it took so long I seriously considered returning it to the libr Jane and the Man of the Cloth by Stephanie Barron is a 1997 Crimeline publication. This second book in the Jane Austen mystery series charged from the gate, when an accident leaves Jane’s sister Cassandra badly injured. But, the momentum was quickly doused with too much wordy dialogue that filled pages, but left me wondering when Jane was ever going to start working on the mystery. Eventually, the pieces began to fall into place, but it took so long I seriously considered returning it to the library unfinished. Smuggling was a huge issue during this time period, so it was not at all far-fetched that Jane noticed what appeared to be just that sort of business running through Lyme Regis, which is where she is staying for the moment. So, intrigue abounds and soon Jane finds herself attempting to lure out a smuggling operation two murders. Will she be able to figure it out without putting herself and her reputation on the line? The setup is certainly interesting, but it seems like the mystery was danced around amid all the social verbiage. However, the pace picks up drastically in the last quarter of the book and became very engaging with a very surprising ending. I still intend to continue on with the series because I have a print copy of the next installment. Hopefully, the pacing will improve by then. 3 stars

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carole (in Canada)

    This is one intrepid Jane Austen! It is September 1804, Jane, her sister, Cassandra, Mr. and Mrs. Austen are on their way to Lyme Regis for a seaside holiday when their carriage is overturned in a storm just outside of the seaside village. Cassandra is injured and Jane heads off with the postboy to the manor house they see lighted in the distance. This is where she meets the rather rude and glowering Mr. Geoffrey Sidmouth and gives him a most scathing setdown as she seeks his help! Only Jane cou This is one intrepid Jane Austen! It is September 1804, Jane, her sister, Cassandra, Mr. and Mrs. Austen are on their way to Lyme Regis for a seaside holiday when their carriage is overturned in a storm just outside of the seaside village. Cassandra is injured and Jane heads off with the postboy to the manor house they see lighted in the distance. This is where she meets the rather rude and glowering Mr. Geoffrey Sidmouth and gives him a most scathing setdown as she seeks his help! Only Jane could stand her ground against such a man! This is definitely not a good beginning to a relaxing seaside holiday! As Lyme Regis is on the coast of Dorset, it is well known for smugglers. Jane soon finds her attention taken away from the manuscript she is trying to write (The Watson's) and is drawn into the intrigues of the local society and the bad blood between Mr. Geoffrey Sidmouth and the smooth talking Captain Fielding. It has been two years since Jane she proved her dear friend, Isobel, the Countess of Scargrave, innocent in the death of her husband. Now she is trying to determine who is the leader of the smugglers, known as The Reverend, and why she has such conflicting emotions over Geoffrey Sidmouth! To further plunge her into this investigation is the murder of one man by hanging and then the murder of another. This was another well written and researched story. I so enjoy the footnotes that explain historical tidbits, Jane Austen's own life and other interesting miscellany. Jane's closeness with her father, reminds me of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Bennet. Her mother's nerves and anxiousness gave me glimpses of Mrs. Bennet. Then to find characteristics of others from her novels in this story as well as some of her writings, just made it that much more enjoyable. The detail and observations made along with the wit imparted by Jane, just made the story that more realistic. For example: "And thus we have the caricature of our age - a gentleman of weak understanding, who apes the form of gentility in an effort to supply his want of substance." I highly recommend this series and that you read them in order. I was pleasantly surprised to read of a character from the first book in this one!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Arybo ✨

    3.5

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melody Schwarting

    A fun little romp in Lyme with our favorite lady of letters. Barron continues the conceit of the story being edited manuscripts from Austen's own hand, and though I came prepared for this, it was still a bit hard to draw the line between fact and fiction in the footnotes. My wish to see more the Austen family was partially fulfilled. Unfortunately, her sister Cassandra and sister-in-law Eliza were absent for much of the novel. While Cassandra was present at the beginning of the novel, she was imm A fun little romp in Lyme with our favorite lady of letters. Barron continues the conceit of the story being edited manuscripts from Austen's own hand, and though I came prepared for this, it was still a bit hard to draw the line between fact and fiction in the footnotes. My wish to see more the Austen family was partially fulfilled. Unfortunately, her sister Cassandra and sister-in-law Eliza were absent for much of the novel. While Cassandra was present at the beginning of the novel, she was immediately incapacitated by a carriage accident, so we never get to know her personality. I was disappointed in the portrayal of Jane's mother. Mrs. Austen bore eight children in fourteen years, all of whom lived to adulthood. Two of her sons went into the Navy, with one ascending to the role of Admiral of the Fleet. Her daughters, though they remained unwed, were steadfast and intelligent. George Austen, who may have had special needs or health problems, still lived a long life, though he was raised by a local family from a young age. On top of this, the Austens were never particularly well-off, and Mrs. Austen managed her family on a clergyman's salary. There was a bit too much of Mrs. Bennett in Mrs. Austen for my taste. The real Mrs. Austen must have been a capable, intelligent woman to succeed in the ways she did. Dear Jane bears a resemblance to the Michelin Man on the cover of this installment; let's hope she gets a better artistic treatment in the third volume of the series.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kirk

    This one earned a 4.5 from me for several reasons. Jane, a great location, a good mystery etc. And one final factor that really touched me. The relationship between Jane and her father Rev. George Austen. He helps and supports her detective efforts. Also, this book is set in Sept 1804, just 4 months before his passing in Jan. 1805. This book also has a balanced view of Mrs Austen. She seems more like the Mrs Bennet of P&P '05, rather than P&P '95. This one earned a 4.5 from me for several reasons. Jane, a great location, a good mystery etc. And one final factor that really touched me. The relationship between Jane and her father Rev. George Austen. He helps and supports her detective efforts. Also, this book is set in Sept 1804, just 4 months before his passing in Jan. 1805. This book also has a balanced view of Mrs Austen. She seems more like the Mrs Bennet of P&P '05, rather than P&P '95.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Dear author, In the future, please show, not tell. xoxoj

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    Some two years have passed since Jane Austen had cause to exercise her fledgling detective skills on behalf of a friend - namely, Isobel, Countess of Scargrave, who, being charged with murder, found herself exonerated thanks to her friend's tireless efforts to uncover the truth of the sad circumstances surrounding her husband's death. Now Jane is bound for the coastal town of Lyme, in the company of her parents and beloved sister Cassandra, when en route their coach is overturned in a violent st Some two years have passed since Jane Austen had cause to exercise her fledgling detective skills on behalf of a friend - namely, Isobel, Countess of Scargrave, who, being charged with murder, found herself exonerated thanks to her friend's tireless efforts to uncover the truth of the sad circumstances surrounding her husband's death. Now Jane is bound for the coastal town of Lyme, in the company of her parents and beloved sister Cassandra, when en route their coach is overturned in a violent storm and Cassandra is left injured. The ever-resourceful Jane seeks help and refuge from the closest home available - High Down Grange, where she meets its owner, the brooding Geoffrey Sidmouth and his beautiful French cousin, Seraphine LaFevre. The manner of their introduction leaves Jane convinced that all is not as it seems at the Grange. After the Austens are safely installed at their rented cottage, the mystery of Geoffrey Sidmouth takes a sinister turn when the object of the man's scorn is found hung at the water's edge. Her curiosity roused, Jane begins to make discreet inquiries and discovers it is openly assumed that Sidmouth is "the Reverend" or "the Man of the Cloth," one of the Gentlemen of the Night - smugglers - who haunt the English coast specializing in the illicit "import" of fine silks and other highly-taxed goods. When one Captain Fielding, a retired Naval officer who claims to be investigating the Reverend, is discovered murdered and all evidence points to Sidmouth's guilt, Jane must use all of her intelligence and investigative abilities to discover the truth of Sidmouth's activities on the coast - for she is as loathe to believe his guilt as she is to admit that the master of the Grange may have captured her heart. Stephanie Barron's second offering featuring the beloved Jane Austen as amateur sleuth is every bit as delightful as the first, proving Barron to be a master at channeling Austen's style and incisive wit and fleshing out what little is known of her life with historical fact and rich period detail. It is established fact that Jane visited Lyme during 1804, and indeed what she encounted there must have made a powerful impression since the town is featured in her final novel, Persuasion. Little correspondence survives from this period in Austen's life, and family rumor alone alludes to a "nameless and dateless" romance Jane experienced with a clergyman during a seaside holiday that provide tantalizing, but unformed, glimpses into this period of Jane's life. Barron uses these bare facts as the basis for Man of the Cloth, fleshing out this period in Austen's life, resulting in a rousing tale of mystery, adventure, espionage, and ill-fated romance. Jane's adventures are wildly varied - she gains as much intelligence from assembly room dances and sitting room calls as she does from highly unorthodox investigations of smugglers' caves and hidden tunnels. One could argue that so much outdoors adventure is outside the realm of possibility in the life of an author known for incisive social commentary, but I for one find the high adventure aspect of this fictional sojourn in Jane's life a fitting tribute of sorts to the adventurous, sensational gothic novels popular in Austen's day, that she would later satirize in her own Northanger Abbey. One of the many things I love about this novel is the way in which Barron grounds Jane's supposed adventures in historical fact. With much of the author's life a veritable blank slate, thanks in large part to Cassandra's measures to protect Jane's privacy by destroying much of their correspondence after her death, Barron has free rein with which she can explore various aspects of 19th-century society and conjecture as to how these adventures may have informed Austen's writing. I was enthralled by Jane's encounter with "free trade" and the Gentlemen of the Night who practiced their dangerous and illicit activities along the English coast. There is something irresistably romantic in association with dangerous and enigmatic rogues who flout law and convention, as Jane discovers with Geoffrey Sidmouth. I was reminded of the 1954 film Moonfleet, and though the film is set some fifty years prior to this novel's action, Stewart Granger's portrayal of a dashing smuggler gave a powerful visual to my image of Sidmouth. Coupled with a dash of espionage that Jane would've been hard-pressed to escape in a coastal community, thanks to England's conflict with Bonaparte and France and her brothers' naval service, Man of the Cloth is a wildly entertaining mystery told with the style, wit, and insight that only a woman of Jane Austen's superior intellect and sense could provide. Bravo, Jane & Stephanie, here's to many more adventures!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This is my second time reading this and I'm increasing my rating to 5 stars!!! I didn't remember how the book went, and now I can't believe I forgot such an exciting adventure (view spoiler)[and a lovely romance! I did, however, remember Lord Harold showing up at the last! :D (hide spoiler)] . It is definitely my favorite of the Jane Austen Mysteries and since it is my favorite book series, that's saying a lot! It's probably also because of the Darcy vs Wickham + Georgiana vibes! This time around This is my second time reading this and I'm increasing my rating to 5 stars!!! I didn't remember how the book went, and now I can't believe I forgot such an exciting adventure (view spoiler)[and a lovely romance! I did, however, remember Lord Harold showing up at the last! :D (hide spoiler)] . It is definitely my favorite of the Jane Austen Mysteries and since it is my favorite book series, that's saying a lot! It's probably also because of the Darcy vs Wickham + Georgiana vibes! This time around when Geoffrey Sidmouth appeared, this is who I thought of: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-_hi3rNXGHg8... <--Matthew Rhys as Darcy in Death Comes to Pemberley. He's kind of a Darcy in this book too, right, so why not? (view spoiler)[ And I thought of this image: Not that this happened but...you know. (hide spoiler)] I ask you, Stephanie Barron, why are these not movies? Masterpiece, are you listening??? ;) Third time reading: (view spoiler)[ I still want to write a fan fiction piece about Sidmouth and Jane in America, an AU one set in modern day. (hide spoiler)]

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dario Delfino

    Kudos to the author for the amazing researches she made in order to write such an accurate historical book. The text is presented as a revised diary of Jane Austen, and it's filled with notations that explain the historical context. I think people who love history, or the early 1800, or Jane Austen will love this book. I also believe women will enjoy the book more than men. I found the writing style so good and accurate that it became insanely boring. I didn't like any character, the story, the s Kudos to the author for the amazing researches she made in order to write such an accurate historical book. The text is presented as a revised diary of Jane Austen, and it's filled with notations that explain the historical context. I think people who love history, or the early 1800, or Jane Austen will love this book. I also believe women will enjoy the book more than men. I found the writing style so good and accurate that it became insanely boring. I didn't like any character, the story, the setting... anything! For me it was just very, very boring, like the history textbook I had to study at school. It's not bad, it's just not for me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emma Rose Ribbons

    Very enjoyable! Also, sadly, very forgettable. It's well-written and the plot is engaging but there isn't enough sense of place and the characters aren't the most memorable either, which is a shame for a series focused on my favourite writer. I'll continue reading those but I won't binge reading the whole series anytime soon. Very enjoyable! Also, sadly, very forgettable. It's well-written and the plot is engaging but there isn't enough sense of place and the characters aren't the most memorable either, which is a shame for a series focused on my favourite writer. I'll continue reading those but I won't binge reading the whole series anytime soon.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    Another good mystery that continued to help me learn more of Regency England manners and methods. Has a "Bad Man" character who Jane is interested in and a "Good Man" character. Loved the setting in Lyme. Another good mystery that continued to help me learn more of Regency England manners and methods. Has a "Bad Man" character who Jane is interested in and a "Good Man" character. Loved the setting in Lyme.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Kepesh

    The series continues, and the strengths are the same: A cozy mystery set in Edwardian England, with all the historical details of everyday life and the political and social currents of the time, and Jane Austen solving mysteries in Lyme.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    I think this one was better than number 1!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Majczan

    I read this in paperback when it first came out but need to reread it in order to post a clear review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Misty Krueger

    I enjoyed this one slightly less than the the first, but it was fun to be at Lyme Regis for this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Meredith (Austenesque Reviews)

    The Being A Jane Austen Mystery Series by Stephanie Barron is a brilliant series of novels that features our beloved Jane Austen being thrust into the midst of mystery, murder and mayhem. In each novel Jane Austen uses her astute observational skills, keen understanding of human nature, and fierce determination to solve various mysteries. Each novel follows the time line of Jane Austen's career and accurately portrays true events and people from her life. This second book takes place in the year The Being A Jane Austen Mystery Series by Stephanie Barron is a brilliant series of novels that features our beloved Jane Austen being thrust into the midst of mystery, murder and mayhem. In each novel Jane Austen uses her astute observational skills, keen understanding of human nature, and fierce determination to solve various mysteries. Each novel follows the time line of Jane Austen's career and accurately portrays true events and people from her life. This second book takes place in the year 1804 (two years after Jane Austen's last adventure in Scargrave). In this novel Mr. and Mrs. Austen travel to Lyme Regis with their two daughters on an extended holiday. Instead of strolling along The Cobb, frequenting the shops on Broad Street, and writing a few chapters in her new manuscript, our beloved author/Regency sleuth becomes embroiled in another mystery and spends her holiday traipsing about caves, visiting prisoners in the Lyme gaol, and gathering clues about a mysterious band of smugglers! Having read several novels from Stephanie Barron's excellent Being a Jane Austen Mystery Series there are three elements that I have found to be synonymous in all her novels. One is her exemplary emulation of Jane Austen's voice. Stephanie Barron's voice for Jane Austen is the perfect blend of intelligence, impertinence, and sarcasm. I know we have no way of knowing how accurate Stephanie Barron is in her portrayal, but my guess is she is pretty darn close! To continue reading, go to: http://janeaustenreviews.blogspot.com...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    The second book in Stephanie Barron's series, Jane and the Man of the Cloth, both disappointed and surprised me. I found it to be a little long-winded when it came to some of the descriptions of scenes (especially in and among the caves) and I thought there were a few too many players on the scene. Nevertheless, I found more that I liked and enjoyed about the book that far outweighed my own personal dislikes. My likes: +Mr. Sidmouth. What a great character! Mysterious and misjudged. Reminded me ve The second book in Stephanie Barron's series, Jane and the Man of the Cloth, both disappointed and surprised me. I found it to be a little long-winded when it came to some of the descriptions of scenes (especially in and among the caves) and I thought there were a few too many players on the scene. Nevertheless, I found more that I liked and enjoyed about the book that far outweighed my own personal dislikes. My likes: +Mr. Sidmouth. What a great character! Mysterious and misjudged. Reminded me very much of Mr. Darcy. +Once again, I love that Barron sets the book in Lyme at a time when the true historical person would have been there. I also enjoyed reading Man of the Cloth at the time I did - after my very first reading of Persuasion! It felt like a familiar setting and place. +Loved the return of a key character from the first book! This person was a favorite character in Scargrave Manor, so I was very pleased to meet him again. (Even if I had wrongly suspected him previously!) I'm very much looking forward to the third mystery!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bodosika Bodosika

    Just a little bit okay... 2star

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nicole D.

    real rating: 3.5 I loved the writing, but the mystery was just too easy to solve and not enough romance for me.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    I love the Austen-like dialogue and attention to detail. The only thing I didn't like was the footnotes, but I only referred to them if I didn't understand the references in the text. I love the Austen-like dialogue and attention to detail. The only thing I didn't like was the footnotes, but I only referred to them if I didn't understand the references in the text.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stef Rozitis

    The author bit of way more than she could chew with this one. Her voice is not the voice of Jane Austen and her eye is not the eye of the genius Austen either. As a mystery set in the time of Austen it has some merit but as a portrait of Jane, it's very, very wrong, the anachronisms become more distracting, the romance less bearable. At one point Barron has Jane think maudlin thoughts about having been left on the shelf- the stereotypical (patriarchal) view of the spinster as incomplete war with The author bit of way more than she could chew with this one. Her voice is not the voice of Jane Austen and her eye is not the eye of the genius Austen either. As a mystery set in the time of Austen it has some merit but as a portrait of Jane, it's very, very wrong, the anachronisms become more distracting, the romance less bearable. At one point Barron has Jane think maudlin thoughts about having been left on the shelf- the stereotypical (patriarchal) view of the spinster as incomplete war with a desire to portray Jane as independent, pseudo-feminist (in a you're-not-like-other-girls sort of a way) and as oddly compelling a positive femme fatale for a 30 something woman still living with her parents. I just don't see Austen in this at all. There's a scene where Jane jokes with Cassandra that her heroine Lizzy (Bennett) is "almost as clever as myself", an attempt to apologise for the lack of intelligence of some of Jane's heroines (missing the point entirely of what were NOT written as romance novels). In the rest of the novel, Jane is portrayed as a pale imitation of Lizzy - there are too many parallels that I don't want to discuss in too many details for fear of spoilers but if you look you will see them. Jane's mother is paid as anxious and dull-witted presumably for laughs, in general all female characters are portrayed as either stupid or morally flawed (or both) whereas the men come off better. This is highlighted in a section where (rarely for this book) Jane is speaking to a woman with no men present and saying she doesn't much like the company of women as if this is commendable (this very much doesn't fit with the way Austen was the first to so unapologetically write the female point of view about real life). There are numerous notes defining historical facts (useful if at times obvious) and making faux connections to Austen's books and apocrypha. I did want to like that Jane (and presumably Barron) were against "free trade" <3 I don't think I will bother seeking out any more of these though if I stumble over them in a street library I may read them (unless more satisfying fare is on offer)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    "Jane and her family are looking forward to a peaceful holiday in the seaside village of Lyme Regis. Yet on the outskirts of town an overturned carriage forces the shaken travelers to take refuge at a nearby manor house. And it is there that Jane meets the darkly forbidding yet strangely attractive Mr. Geoffrey Sidmouth. What murky secrets does the brooding Mr. Sidmouth seek to hide? Jane suspects the worst -- but her attention is swiftly diverted when a man is discovered hanged from a makeshift "Jane and her family are looking forward to a peaceful holiday in the seaside village of Lyme Regis. Yet on the outskirts of town an overturned carriage forces the shaken travelers to take refuge at a nearby manor house. And it is there that Jane meets the darkly forbidding yet strangely attractive Mr. Geoffrey Sidmouth. What murky secrets does the brooding Mr. Sidmouth seek to hide? Jane suspects the worst -- but her attention is swiftly diverted when a man is discovered hanged from a makeshift gibbet by the sea. The worthies of Lyme are certain his death is the work of 'the Reverend,' the ringleader of the midnight smuggling trade whose identity is the town's paramount mystery. Now, it fall to Jane to entrap and expose the notorious Reverend -- even if the evidence points to the last person on earth she wants to suspect ... a man who already may have won her heart." ~~back cover 105 pages into the book, I realized I was bored silly. This fanfic series seems to tend toward the "much ado about nothing" philosophy of filling out a book. Not much has happened, aside from the hanging, except a series of encounters consisting of gossip and counter-gossip. With the exception of a trip to the fossil cliffs, which was of necessity short and not very revealing. I can almost guess the rest of the book: Jane finds herself compelled to dive into the mystery of the smuggling ring, and all the clues point more and more toward Mr. Sidmouth. And therefore you can bet he's not the Reverend. My money's on Captain Fielding, who has presented himself as an excise man. I certainly am not in the mood for another 230 pages of this.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barclay Dunn

    I liked it! Having read nearly all of Jane Austen's works, and several of them many times, at first I was put off by seeing lines in this novel that nearly or exactly echoed lines from the actual writer's works ... but at some point it occurred to me that this novel is meant to be pages from Jane's diary, and thus it's entirely reasonable that she'd have tried out phrases in here, that she would later use in one of her novels. Once I got past that stumbling point, I was more than happy to suspen I liked it! Having read nearly all of Jane Austen's works, and several of them many times, at first I was put off by seeing lines in this novel that nearly or exactly echoed lines from the actual writer's works ... but at some point it occurred to me that this novel is meant to be pages from Jane's diary, and thus it's entirely reasonable that she'd have tried out phrases in here, that she would later use in one of her novels. Once I got past that stumbling point, I was more than happy to suspend my disbelief regarding Jane taking actions in the furtherance of detecting. I liked the imagining of her relationship with her father: I've never done any scholarship into what her personal life was really like, but I am happy thinking of her having had a loving and tolerant relationship with him. I've read a couple other entries in the Jane Austen "fan fiction" genre, but frankly very few as I'm loath to pollute the Austen-world in my head with work that isn't hers.* But I liked this, maybe precisely for the reason I was initially put off; the language used was very much on point. Also I thought the action was quite rollicking (probably suspiciously for the time, but it pulled me along as the reader). In general I'd say try it out. I'll most likely go back and read the Jane Austen Mystery #1 some time soon. ---- * Of those, my favorite prior to this has been Mary B: A Novel: An Untold Story of Pride and Prejudice, by Katherine J. Chen, and my least favorite ones have been Joan Aiken's highly recommended sequels.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    I thoroughly enjoy Stephanie Barron's writing style in the"Being Jane Austen" mystery series. However, my only complaint in this particular novel is that it literally took half the book before "the murder" took place! Being somewhat of an aficenado of mystery novels, I do understand the need to set the scene(s), create believable characters -- especially those that will be the Red Herrings -- and all the rest. Still, taking up nearly half the book seemed nearly tedious to me (and I suspect for so I thoroughly enjoy Stephanie Barron's writing style in the"Being Jane Austen" mystery series. However, my only complaint in this particular novel is that it literally took half the book before "the murder" took place! Being somewhat of an aficenado of mystery novels, I do understand the need to set the scene(s), create believable characters -- especially those that will be the Red Herrings -- and all the rest. Still, taking up nearly half the book seemed nearly tedious to me (and I suspect for some readers, they may have given up, unfortunately). The payoff was the second half of the novel. The pace picked up quickly, all the characters were clearly acting according to how I recognized they would, which was helpful. As in the first book, it was only in the final pages that everything made sense, although this time, I was able to make some sense of the hero's actions prior to the climax and denouement. This is a very good mystery! Just be prepared to stick with it, and enjoy the slow ride to the top. 😊 RECOMMENDED

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ines Dossena

    Seconda indagine di Jane Austen. Mentre la famiglia Austen sta andando per un soggiorno estivo a Lyme Regis, la carrozza che li sta trasportando si ribalta e Cassandra la sorella di Jane rimane gravemente ferita. Jane si reca alla casa più vicina per chiedere aiuto e si imbatte in Geoffrey Sidmouth, un uomo molto affascinante, ma che la inquieta molto. Dopo poco che la famiglia soggiorna a Lyme un uomo viene trovato impiccato sulla spiaggia e la colpa ricade sul Reverendo. Il signor Sidmouth viene Seconda indagine di Jane Austen. Mentre la famiglia Austen sta andando per un soggiorno estivo a Lyme Regis, la carrozza che li sta trasportando si ribalta e Cassandra la sorella di Jane rimane gravemente ferita. Jane si reca alla casa più vicina per chiedere aiuto e si imbatte in Geoffrey Sidmouth, un uomo molto affascinante, ma che la inquieta molto. Dopo poco che la famiglia soggiorna a Lyme un uomo viene trovato impiccato sulla spiaggia e la colpa ricade sul Reverendo. Il signor Sidmouth viene accusato di omicidio quindi Jane investiga per salvare la sua reputazione. Lui ormai gli è entrato nel cuore. Come il precedente mi è piaciuto moltissimo. Lo stile di scrittura, la descrizione di luoghi usi è vestiti sono giusti per epoca narrata e sembra di essere al fianco di Jane. "Com'è possibile che i nostri cuori palpitino alla vista di tutto ciò che è bello, rapido e audace, volgendo le palle alla stolida prevedibilità di ciò che è mediocre e consueto? Soltanto Eva, nell'atto di cogliere la mela, potrebbe fornire la risposta."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    At first I found this story a bit slow to start, but then I got caught up in the tale and enjoyed it a great deal. Although I have read most if not all of the Jane Austen books, I am not such a fan as to be able to speak authoritatively to the similarities between them and this book, but I suspect it is pretty authentic in tone. On top of that, the author includes editor's notes, mostly on historical points which make it seem as if it is based on Austen's letters and diaries. It takes close to h At first I found this story a bit slow to start, but then I got caught up in the tale and enjoyed it a great deal. Although I have read most if not all of the Jane Austen books, I am not such a fan as to be able to speak authoritatively to the similarities between them and this book, but I suspect it is pretty authentic in tone. On top of that, the author includes editor's notes, mostly on historical points which make it seem as if it is based on Austen's letters and diaries. It takes close to half of the book to actually develop a mystery, but it is entertaining even before the murder with the background and interaction between the characters. Jane remains her usual strong-minded and hypercritical self, but the implication is that the "hero" of this story is the reason she remained unmarried. Yes, I'll be looking for others in this series.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bethany Swafford

    On the outskirts of Lyme, the Austens' carriage is overturned and they are forced to take shelter in the home of Mr. Sidmouth. Thus begins Jane's holiday in Lyme. A man is found hanged from a makeshift gibbet. Rumors of a ringleader of the local smuggling trade abound. Can Jane find the truth of the matter? This was a fascinating read, with plenty of details of the smuggling trade of the time and of Lyme. It was slow to start, though it hinted at mystery and intrigue from the start. Jane's invest On the outskirts of Lyme, the Austens' carriage is overturned and they are forced to take shelter in the home of Mr. Sidmouth. Thus begins Jane's holiday in Lyme. A man is found hanged from a makeshift gibbet. Rumors of a ringleader of the local smuggling trade abound. Can Jane find the truth of the matter? This was a fascinating read, with plenty of details of the smuggling trade of the time and of Lyme. It was slow to start, though it hinted at mystery and intrigue from the start. Jane's investigation did not begin until about halfway into the novel. By the last quarter, the story picked up the pace and there were culprits afoot! Jane's curiosity was understandable, even though it did get a bit ridiculous in her pursuit of the facts. An excellent continuation of Jane's mysteries! I look forward to book 3.

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