counter create hit El fabuloso barco fluvial - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

El fabuloso barco fluvial

Availability: Ready to download

Resucitado, con el resto de la humanidad, en las ricas y misteriosas orillas del Mundo del Río, Samuel Langhorne Clemens (más conocido por el seudónimo de Mark Twain) tiene un sueño: construir un barco fluvial que rivalice con los mejores vapores que recorrieron el Misisipi y subir el río hasta su nacimiento, donde están los todopoderosos vigilantes del Mundo del Río, y su Resucitado, con el resto de la humanidad, en las ricas y misteriosas orillas del Mundo del Río, Samuel Langhorne Clemens (más conocido por el seudónimo de Mark Twain) tiene un sueño: construir un barco fluvial que rivalice con los mejores vapores que recorrieron el Misisipi y subir el río hasta su nacimiento, donde están los todopoderosos vigilantes del Mundo del Río, y sus secretos. Pero antes debe realizar un peligroso viaje para desenterrar un meteorito caído. La misión requerirá sellar una alianza difícil con el sanguinario vikingo Erik Hachasangrienta, el traicionero Juan sin Tierra de Inglaterra, el legendario espadachín Cyrano de Bergerac, el aventurero griego Ulises y el infame nazi Hermann Goering.


Compare
Ads Banner

Resucitado, con el resto de la humanidad, en las ricas y misteriosas orillas del Mundo del Río, Samuel Langhorne Clemens (más conocido por el seudónimo de Mark Twain) tiene un sueño: construir un barco fluvial que rivalice con los mejores vapores que recorrieron el Misisipi y subir el río hasta su nacimiento, donde están los todopoderosos vigilantes del Mundo del Río, y su Resucitado, con el resto de la humanidad, en las ricas y misteriosas orillas del Mundo del Río, Samuel Langhorne Clemens (más conocido por el seudónimo de Mark Twain) tiene un sueño: construir un barco fluvial que rivalice con los mejores vapores que recorrieron el Misisipi y subir el río hasta su nacimiento, donde están los todopoderosos vigilantes del Mundo del Río, y sus secretos. Pero antes debe realizar un peligroso viaje para desenterrar un meteorito caído. La misión requerirá sellar una alianza difícil con el sanguinario vikingo Erik Hachasangrienta, el traicionero Juan sin Tierra de Inglaterra, el legendario espadachín Cyrano de Bergerac, el aventurero griego Ulises y el infame nazi Hermann Goering.

30 review for El fabuloso barco fluvial

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    It's a pretty okay novel, but it suffers from being a product of its times. That being said, it's pretty fun to ride with Samuel L. Clemens on his constantly-being-built steamboat, made of "Space Age" plastics! Wooooo that stuff is a pretty neat idea! Ahem. Sorry. I got carried away there. A lot of the action is mostly finding new ways to build tech on the extremely huge world of reincarnated humans from all time periods showing up at the same time here, but we've moved along far enough that nat It's a pretty okay novel, but it suffers from being a product of its times. That being said, it's pretty fun to ride with Samuel L. Clemens on his constantly-being-built steamboat, made of "Space Age" plastics! Wooooo that stuff is a pretty neat idea! Ahem. Sorry. I got carried away there. A lot of the action is mostly finding new ways to build tech on the extremely huge world of reincarnated humans from all time periods showing up at the same time here, but we've moved along far enough that nations are being built and fortresses and boundaries are in full effect. Resource gathering is also a must, especially for a certain Mark Twain if he'll ever live out his dream of captaining his own steamboat. Of course, this is riverworld. In 1971, the time when the novel came out, we're forced to face our worst nightmares (*laugh*) of an entirely black nation wanting to go completely isolationist from the honky. The arabs are too white, too, so even though they make up 1/6th of this separate riverworld nation, they're still getting evicted. "We're not perfect, whitey, but at least it'll be Our Problem. We blame you for everything." Storyline. Ahem. Let me be clear here. Practically EVERY treatment of the issue that I've ever read is better than this one. It's nearly a stereotype of a stereotype of black power, taken so far that it has come out the other side into near satire. So, yeah, action happens, and tragedies, too, and all the while the mysterious counter-plan alien is trying to help ease our sufferings on this admittedly great-idea world. :) Not the best novel I've ever read, by a long shot, but not incapable of telling a story, either. :) The first one was a lot more enjoyable. Sam was a bit too whiny for my tastes. *shrug* I'm going to continue the series. This was hardly a deal-breaker. It's just a cultural-awareness crapfest issue. :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Oh FFS. Really? The only part of this that survived the decades well is the subplot about SamMark and his beloved, obsessed-over Livy. Be careful what you wish for in this life! (I actually mean "Riverworld life," though that hoary old saying is hoary and old because it never stops being true.) The "race relations" aren't new or trenchant, just tediously familiar. The modern then, well-trodden-trail now use of insomnia, depression, and drug use to self-medicate them is gloom-inducing. Heteronormat Oh FFS. Really? The only part of this that survived the decades well is the subplot about SamMark and his beloved, obsessed-over Livy. Be careful what you wish for in this life! (I actually mean "Riverworld life," though that hoary old saying is hoary and old because it never stops being true.) The "race relations" aren't new or trenchant, just tediously familiar. The modern then, well-trodden-trail now use of insomnia, depression, and drug use to self-medicate them is gloom-inducing. Heteronormative dreariness is de rigueur, tobacco use is unstigmatized, and the whole damned enterprise has at its core a frustrating reality: THIS IS A HUGE MISSED OPPORTUNITY. There's no essential difference between the various factions scrapping over bits and pieces. There's nothing, in short, new under this brand-new sun. But DAYUM is the Fabulous Riverboat a spiffy Maguffin. I don't think it's too much to say the ride is worth the journey if only just.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    Revisit 2015 via audio file 09:04:17 Description: In To Your Scattered Bodies Go, Philip José Farmer introduces readers to the awesome Riverworld, a planet that had been carved into one large river on whose shores all of humanity throughout the ages has seemingly been resurrected. In The Fabulous Riverboat, Farmer tells the tale of one person whose is uniquely suited to find the river's headwaters, riverboat captain and famous Earthly author Sam Clemens (a.k.a. Mark Twain). Clemens has been visi Revisit 2015 via audio file 09:04:17 Description: In To Your Scattered Bodies Go, Philip José Farmer introduces readers to the awesome Riverworld, a planet that had been carved into one large river on whose shores all of humanity throughout the ages has seemingly been resurrected. In The Fabulous Riverboat, Farmer tells the tale of one person whose is uniquely suited to find the river's headwaters, riverboat captain and famous Earthly author Sam Clemens (a.k.a. Mark Twain). Clemens has been visited by "X," a mysterious being who claims to be a rebel among the group that created Riverworld. X tells Clemens where he can find a large deposit of iron and other materials that Clemens can use to build the greatest riverboat ever seen. Since there is virtually no metal on the planet, it will also give Clemens an unbeatable edge when it comes to battling the various warlike societies that dominate the Riverworld. But Clemens is not alone in his quest for the iron, which arrives on the planet in the form of a giant meteorite. In fact, Clemens is besieged on all sides by forces determined to seize the precious ore, leading him to make a deadly pact with one of history's most notorious villains, John Lackland. Lackland's crimes during his reign as king of England were so hideous that no other English monarch will ever carry his name, and he's up to equally nefarious tricks on Riverworld. However, Clemens has a guardian angel in the form of Joe Miller, a giant subhuman with a big nose, a serious lisp, and a cutting wit. Miller has also been to the very headwaters of the river, where he saw a mysterious tower in the middle of the North Sea and where the creators of Riverworld are thought to reside. He will be an invaluable ally in completing the riverboat and sailing to the headwaters, but even an 800-pound giant may not be enough to help Clemens fulfill X's mission. --Craig E. Engler These books are standing the test of time, in fact more enjoyable because of the increased knowledge of historical personages over a reading life. Found it exquisite fun that Lackland and Arthur meet. X is enticing too - imagine being able to send a meteorite at will. River as ouroboros Samuel Clemens Eric Bloodaxe John Lackland, AND... Arthur I, Duke of Brittany Lothar von Richthofen Cyrano de Bergerac Olivia Langdon Clemens Author Samuel Longhorne Clemens, better known under his pen name, Mark Twain NEWS 04.05.2015: Hundreds of reports by Mark Twain, describing life in San Francisco for a newspaper in Nevada, have been unearthed by scholars at Berkeley. Source 5* To Their Scattered Bodies Go CR The Fabulous Riverboat (Riverworld, #2) The Dark Design (Riverworld, #3) The Magic Labyrinth (Riverworld, #4) The Gods of Riverworld (Riverworld #5)

  4. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    As in the first book, Farmer bites off more than he can chew. By using real individuals and cultures from history as his fodder, Farmer invites close inspection by readers familiar with (and fond of) those characters and cultures. His protagonist is an unfunny Mark Twain, whose occasional spoutings lack the vitriol for which Twain is renowned. Farmer seems to take direct quotes (often from Twain's books) and place them awkwardly into the conversation, which only makes conspicuous how dull the res As in the first book, Farmer bites off more than he can chew. By using real individuals and cultures from history as his fodder, Farmer invites close inspection by readers familiar with (and fond of) those characters and cultures. His protagonist is an unfunny Mark Twain, whose occasional spoutings lack the vitriol for which Twain is renowned. Farmer seems to take direct quotes (often from Twain's books) and place them awkwardly into the conversation, which only makes conspicuous how dull the rest of the dialogue is. Likewise, the many conflicting cultures are oversimplified and whitewashed. Peace and war both come too easily, and intrigue tends to be replaced by bare conflict. Farmer includes the grandest political players to ever take the stage, and then reduces them to petty warlords. The whole plot is moved along by a mysterious and literal deus ex machina, and despite the buildup of the first book, Farmer brings us no closer to uncovering the grand mystery. Though I was curious how he meant to resolve the questions raised by his grandiose world, he revealed too little to titillate. This, combined with the massive influx of minor characters to an already busy and muddled plot did little to keep me reading. Perhaps I will get to the other books at some point, but with my current to-read pile, it doesn't seem worth the trudge. There is an entertaining throwaway character in this book, a huge pre-human giant. Farmer strains credibility by having him quickly learn human speech (impossible even for normal humans who were not exposed as children, let alone a pre-human larynx). The titan also quickly grasps abstract thought, humor, planning, rationality, and sarcasm. Perhaps Farmer is a hard-line Chomskyan. Farmer's idea for this series was audacious, but his plotting and characterization are rather bland, and seem even moreso against the unbelievably grand backdrop of Riverworld. Like Feynman said of religion: "The stage is too big for the drama".

  5. 4 out of 5

    ♥ Marlene♥

    Well this book was a bit of a disappointment to me. I loved book 1 but book 2 , I do not know, It seems to me it was more a war book. There were still scenes I thought interesting, like the relation ship between Sam and his earth wife and I liked The Big guy but hated the way he talked. It was hard for me to understand what he was saying, but overall I was just glad to end it. I will give book 3 a try. I am reading it right now and glad to be back with Richard F. Burton to be honest. Maybe that w Well this book was a bit of a disappointment to me. I loved book 1 but book 2 , I do not know, It seems to me it was more a war book. There were still scenes I thought interesting, like the relation ship between Sam and his earth wife and I liked The Big guy but hated the way he talked. It was hard for me to understand what he was saying, but overall I was just glad to end it. I will give book 3 a try. I am reading it right now and glad to be back with Richard F. Burton to be honest. Maybe that was another reason, so many new people and I did not really like Sam as much.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    I had to DNF this. Since I liked the first book so much, I was surprised how much I disliked this sequel. I was fascinated with the concept that everyone who had ever lived had been resurrected into this strange Riverworld. But as much as I enjoyed To Your Scattered Bodies Go, this second installment just fell flat for me. The characters seemed one-dimensional and I had no interest in the fighting and battles. I should have quit after the first book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Holden Attradies

    This is one of those times that a sequel to an amazing book isn't just as good, but far surpasses it. Farmer takes the world he set up in the first Riverworld book and takes the idea of a few select resurrected members of humanity trying to uncover the secrets of how and why they were resurrected. This centers around Samuel Clemens obsession of building a grand riverboat to take them to the headwaters. Clemens is an amazing main character. He is so neurotic and filled with so much guilt and self This is one of those times that a sequel to an amazing book isn't just as good, but far surpasses it. Farmer takes the world he set up in the first Riverworld book and takes the idea of a few select resurrected members of humanity trying to uncover the secrets of how and why they were resurrected. This centers around Samuel Clemens obsession of building a grand riverboat to take them to the headwaters. Clemens is an amazing main character. He is so neurotic and filled with so much guilt and self doubts that he creates his own antagonists as time goes by, seemingly creating plot after plot. I don't know how to to history this interpretation of him is but as a character in a book he is amazing. There are times where you feel sympathy for him, hatred, and frustration at how he self sabotages himself. His loyal friend and body guard, the Titanthrop Joe Miller steals the show in every scene he's in, so much so that one of the few complaints I'd ever muster of this book is that the second half uses him less and less for little apparent reason. And of course there is the main antagonist, King John. Again, I'm not sure how true to history his portrayal here is but Farmer makes him out to be such a devious backstabbing bastard that it's hard not to adore him as Clemens main antagonist.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    I don't know much about Mark Twain but he was insufferable in this story. The whole thing was incredibly boring -- blah blah angst, blah blah battles, more battles, yada yada factories, pinch of racism, and end. I feel like this whole thing could have been a page or so explanation for the next book. As it is, it was 250+ tedious pages that added very little to the world building. To Your Scattered Bodies Go introduced such a cool world and tantalizing questions and this was a really disappointin I don't know much about Mark Twain but he was insufferable in this story. The whole thing was incredibly boring -- blah blah angst, blah blah battles, more battles, yada yada factories, pinch of racism, and end. I feel like this whole thing could have been a page or so explanation for the next book. As it is, it was 250+ tedious pages that added very little to the world building. To Your Scattered Bodies Go introduced such a cool world and tantalizing questions and this was a really disappointing follow up.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kat Hooper

    ORIGINALLY POSTED AT Fantasy Literature. To Your Scattered Bodies Go, the first of Philip Jose Farmer’s Riverworld novels, was a fast-paced, highly creative, and extremely exciting story, so I was eager to continue the tale in the second novel, The Fabulous Riverboat. This part of the story of mankind’s resurrection onto a million-miles-long stretch of river valley focuses on Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) — one of the people who’ve been contacted by a traitor who hopes to use twelve special humans ORIGINALLY POSTED AT Fantasy Literature. To Your Scattered Bodies Go, the first of Philip Jose Farmer’s Riverworld novels, was a fast-paced, highly creative, and extremely exciting story, so I was eager to continue the tale in the second novel, The Fabulous Riverboat. This part of the story of mankind’s resurrection onto a million-miles-long stretch of river valley focuses on Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) — one of the people who’ve been contacted by a traitor who hopes to use twelve special humans to disrupt the plans of the creatures (gods? aliens?) who are responsible for the Resurrection. At the beginning of The Fabulous Riverboat, we meet Sam Clemens and his 800 lb Neanderthal bodyguard named Joe Miller. (Note: I highly recommend Recorded Books’ audiobook version narrated by Paul Hecht. Joe Miller’s lisping speech is difficult to read in print, but Mr. Hecht is brilliant with him.) Sam Clemens and Joe Miller are on a Viking ship that is searching for iron-rich meteors (the Riverworld has very few mineral deposits). The Vikings want the iron for weapons, but Sam wants to build a huge steamboat so he can sail up the river to its source and confront the beings who run the planet. Sam gets some help from the mysterious traitor who tells him where to find required materials, but then he must work with tyrannical humans who want to hoard their countries’ natural resources or promote their political or religious agendas. Thus, there’s a lot more threatening, squabbling, political maneuvering, dealing, double-dealing, and war going on than actual ship-building. It’s fun to meet real historical tyrants in Riverworld — they tend to rise to the top and become the leaders of aggressive city-states. It’s also amusing to watch the interactions of humans from such a wide range of time periods. For example, we see Joe Miller gradually becoming more cynical and humorous as he spends time with Mark Twain and we watch a 20th century engineer teach Twain how to store electricity to power the riverboat. What’s not fun is that Philip Jose Farmer takes every opportunity to provide information about each of the characters who’s a real historical figure, and this is inelegantly done: "I read about him in school!” von Richthofen said. “Let’s see. He was born in 1797, died about 1853, I believe. He was an artillery expert and a good friend of Frederick Wilhelm IV of Prussia. He was called ‘The Warlike Monk’ because he was a general who also had strict religious views. He died when he was about fifty years old, a disappointed man because he had been dropped from favor... And sometimes the facts are repeated. For example, we’re told at least twice that John Lackland was such a bad king that the English swore they’d never have another king named John. Also annoying is that Farmer frequently takes the opportunity to address topics such as racism and determinism by either having characters hold long philosophical discourses, or by obvious and clumsy manipulation of the plot. The end result is that there is lots of teaching and moralizing and little action in The Fabulous Riverboat. If you look at the book cover, you’d expect to be exploring Riverworld from the deck of Mark Twain’s steamboat, but the boat finally gets finished at the end of the novel. It’s the wonderful world-building and intriguing questions that make this series so compelling: Why has humankind been resurrected? Who created this world? Who is the traitor? Is there a way out? What’s the purpose of dream gum? But we don’t get to explore much of Riverworld and we learn very little about it in The Fabulous Riverboat. I’m still so curious, though, so I’m hoping we’ll progress more quickly in the next installment: The Dark Design. Later addendum: When I began downloading the audio version of The Dark Design, I realized it was 18 hours long — twice the length of the previous novels. I decided to investigate before committing and was disappointed to learn from other reviewers that the series degenerates after The Fabulous Riverboat. Readers cite the same issues I’ve mentioned here and other issues that killed their enjoyment of Riverworld. There was such a consensus that I feel I should believe them and not waste my time on a series that will ultimately disappoint me. I’m sad to say that I’m going to quit here — I just don’t have time to read bad books. This is especially upsetting because I really loved To Your Scattered Bodies Go. I also want to find out the answers I posed in the previous paragraph. If you know the answers, please tell me in a comment below. If nobody knows, I’ll just skim through the last half of book 4, The Magic Labyrinth, to find out. According to readers, that’s where the uninspiring answers are to be found).

  10. 5 out of 5

    LindaJ^

    This is the second installation in the Riverworld saga. In the first, Richard Burton (the English explorer, not the actor) was the primary character. In this book, it is Samuel Clemens who is front and center. He is on a mission to find some iron so he can build (and captain) a riverboat to the end/beginning of the river. He gets some help from "X", one of the "ethicals" (nonhuman) who is responsible for the rebirth of all the people on Riverworld, but one who disagrees with what's going on. App This is the second installation in the Riverworld saga. In the first, Richard Burton (the English explorer, not the actor) was the primary character. In this book, it is Samuel Clemens who is front and center. He is on a mission to find some iron so he can build (and captain) a riverboat to the end/beginning of the river. He gets some help from "X", one of the "ethicals" (nonhuman) who is responsible for the rebirth of all the people on Riverworld, but one who disagrees with what's going on. Apparently, there are a total of 12 people among the humans who have been chosen to assist X and his cohorts. X says he arranged for a meteor to land on Riverworld so that Sam would have a sufficient source of iron and other ores to get his riverboat built. Sam's attempt to build the boat runs into lots of trouble, including from John Lackland (King John), with whom Sam finds it necessary to partner. On Riverworld, Sam has acquired a blood brother -- Joe Hill. Joe is a pre-human from about a million years ago. He is huge (but has flat feet) and scares the crap out of most people. There is a fair amount of action in this story, but much seems repetitious. I think this book could have used a bit more editing to make it tighter. Sam's rather pessimistic (ok, he has reason to be) and spends a far amount of time reflecting back on his prior life. As with the first book in the series, the book ends with a cliffhanger.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Thrasher

    The last time I read this book was probably 25 years ago. But for about 10 years - let's say age 14 - 25, I loved these books. If you asked me, I could probably reliably narrate most of the plots of each book in the series, enough to maybe even make YOU want to read it. Some books from long ago, you go back and re-read and it's a pleasure. You discover new things about the book, you remember why you loved the book in the first place, it becomes even more a part of your heart and soul. Some books, The last time I read this book was probably 25 years ago. But for about 10 years - let's say age 14 - 25, I loved these books. If you asked me, I could probably reliably narrate most of the plots of each book in the series, enough to maybe even make YOU want to read it. Some books from long ago, you go back and re-read and it's a pleasure. You discover new things about the book, you remember why you loved the book in the first place, it becomes even more a part of your heart and soul. Some books, you re-read after many years, and you rediscover new things, or notice things you may have missed (In Judy Blume's Blubber they call the teacher A BITCH. Not a witch, not a hag, not a gritch, not a grump - a BITCH. That was a shocker I did not remember). Some books, I guess, you re-read, or try to re-read, and realize what a piece of shit taste you had when you were 17 years old. The Fabulous Riverboat is fucking awful. It's dreadfully written, with incredibly stupid dialogue and plot twists. It looks wonderful on paper. The covers are brilliantly rendered and clever. But oh, my brain! It hurts after reading this. So much. I have saved these books for years, moved them from place to place (paid to have them moved several times). No more. You REALLY can never go home.

  12. 4 out of 5

    blake

    What a pleasure after my disastrous end of the year experiences to read a competently written novel by a writer I've known about for years but never taken the plunge on. The story, which is considered sci-fi but clearly testing Clarke's third law, is about the dead of earth who find themselves resurrected on a massive alien—we'll call it a planet—which consists of a giant river flowing tens or hundreds of thousands of miles and is banked on either side by impossibly high mountains. Every one has What a pleasure after my disastrous end of the year experiences to read a competently written novel by a writer I've known about for years but never taken the plunge on. The story, which is considered sci-fi but clearly testing Clarke's third law, is about the dead of earth who find themselves resurrected on a massive alien—we'll call it a planet—which consists of a giant river flowing tens or hundreds of thousands of miles and is banked on either side by impossibly high mountains. Every one has a magic "grail" that provides them with sustenance, and healing is generally always possible, but even if a person dies, they're just reborn at an apparently random alternate location on the river. Death is still essentially death, in other words, though the characters wrestle with that fine line as to whether killing someone who comes right back still counts as murder. It's a violent world full of slavery and war, with many of the character of Earth history rising to similar positions as they had in life. Our hero is Samuel Clemens. Yeah, Mark Twain, which is the sort of thing that generally makes me queasy (along with including lots of historical characters in novels, generally) but Farmer does a very good job shaping out a plausible character for Clemens, so he won me over. Clemens is visited by an Ethical—a member of the alien race that has rebirthed all the dead, and who objects to the ethicality of the "experiment". Or maybe he's just yanking Clemens' chain, we don't really know. But the alien (named by Clemens The Mysterious Stranger, amusingly enough) has arranged for a meteor to strike the river, and in that meteor is enough iron for Clemens to accomplish his dream of building a Riverboat. (The river is home to bamboo and wood and fish but not much else in the way of resources.) With that riverboat he plans to journey up to the headwaters and...well, find out what's going on. It's a big river. And a 40 year trip. And that's when he actually manages to build the boat, which isn't easy because, as I've mentioned, everybody's always fighting and jockeying for position on the river, and while Clemens manages, through an act of treachery, to secure the iron, the other minerals require negotiating with other colonies and they have both a strong interest in gouging him and in stopping him from making this boat, which could be the ultimate war machine. I've commented on this many, many times, but it's amazing how much old time writers crammed into 250 pages, especially as compared with today's authors. And this book doesn't feel rushed, or poorly fleshed out. Besides Clemens, we get very good character development for Joe Miller, Clemens' right-hand man (who is a literal giant proto-man from ancient history), John Lackland (the treacherous former King of England), Firebrass (an African-American engineer), Clemens' former-wife Livy, who has taken up with Cyrano—yes, that Cyrano, who is also well drawn. And there are many more! Racism figures hugely into this story, but it's very nicely used for the larger question: Can man change? We know what Twain thought from "The Mysterious Stranger". But we can see that Farmer doesn't agree with him, as the displaced earthlings from various time evolve out of their prejudices—or they don't! The choice is the thing. I really didn't know how it was going to turn out. It was clear to me at the halfway point, the building of the boat was the central issue. The actual journey would have to come at a later time. But again, a salute to the old writers: I didn't actually mean to read this book for my F. I'm not sure if I have #1 (or the rest of the series) but I don't feel ripped off. It's a good, complete, satisfying story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really liked the first Riverworld novel, so I got the other three in Famer's original series right after I finished that book. I didn't dislike The Fabulous Riverboat, but it was a very different reading experience from To Your Scattered Bodies Go. While that novel was about Burton constantly moving to an objective, experiencing the new and fascinating Riverworld, and trying to understand what's happening to him and those around him, TFR was much more static and closed - Clemens spends the who I really liked the first Riverworld novel, so I got the other three in Famer's original series right after I finished that book. I didn't dislike The Fabulous Riverboat, but it was a very different reading experience from To Your Scattered Bodies Go. While that novel was about Burton constantly moving to an objective, experiencing the new and fascinating Riverworld, and trying to understand what's happening to him and those around him, TFR was much more static and closed - Clemens spends the whole book essentially in one place (emotionally if not physically) trying to build his riverboat, and when he finally succeeds, it was all for nothing (in this book, anyway). Now, that doesn't mean I didn't enjoy the book - I just think it serves a different purpose, zooming in where book 1 zoomed out, and that zoomed-in story was sometimes harder to read. The first book has some dated (but not really offensive) stuff on gender; this book has less, but more dated stuff on race. Farmer is obviously trying to say good things about how people should work together, but the way he does it hasn't aged all that well. Still, I enjoyed the book and will definitely continue with book 3 in the series.

  14. 5 out of 5

    prcardi

    Storyline: 2/5 Characters: 2/5 Writing Style: 3/5 World: 2/5 This wasn't the book I wanted, and it wasn't the book I expected. I was prepared for the story of Riverworld to advance, but this was basically a parallel story to the first in the series. When I realized that this story was going to follow Mark Twain/Samuel Clemens, I was skeptical. Clemens has a reputation for riotously witty banter and commentary. Farmer's handling of characters in the first book of the series did not suggest to me that Storyline: 2/5 Characters: 2/5 Writing Style: 3/5 World: 2/5 This wasn't the book I wanted, and it wasn't the book I expected. I was prepared for the story of Riverworld to advance, but this was basically a parallel story to the first in the series. When I realized that this story was going to follow Mark Twain/Samuel Clemens, I was skeptical. Clemens has a reputation for riotously witty banter and commentary. Farmer's handling of characters in the first book of the series did not suggest to me that he would be able to build up a worthy Clemens. And he didn't. But his Clemens had a few moments that showed Farmer was at least trying. Likewise, I wasn't enthralled with the idea of reading another novel of river-adventures on Riverworld. The founding book had started with wonder and promise and degenerated into a plodding tale. I was worried that the second would peak with plodding tale and continue downward from there. Farmer surprised me, however, with his attempts to build up the individuals of Riverworld. How does resurrection change the behavior of mankind? It wasn't a particularly coherent inquiry or insightful, but again, at least he tried. The above is the positive review of the protagonist and Riverworld civilization. The downside to those two made this a decidedly negative reading experience. The protagonist: Put aside the question of whether or not Farmer captured the essence of Clemens. The problem that irked me throughout the book was, why Clemens? Burton at least, in the first, was an accomplished leader and adventurer. Clemens, in contrast, is more of a celebrity than hero. One of the minor characters in the story once criticizes Clemens's leadership, "But levity or mild irony aren't going to get us any place." And that character was right! But Farmer never had Clemens respond to the charge, nor does the author himself seem to take the matter seriously. To his credit, Farmer doesn't turn Clemens into an action-star. As a result, though, our protagonist bumbles through the novel always fumbling to respond to developments instead of proactively doing anything himself. The drama routinely circles around whether or not Clemens loses control of his project. But there are untold numbers of people who were better qualified to lead the Fabulous Riverboat project. There were several characters in this book who would have better served it. Thus when the suspense and tension hinged on Clemens keeping his place in the story, I didn't care. When Clemens's life or role were threatened (and we were supposed to be trembling or livid in our chairs at home), I was ready for Clemens to exit. Instead of cheering for, sympathizing with, and being loyal to the protagonist, I inwardly approved when he failed. This made the drama of the story unfold very differently than Farmer intended and was not particularly satisfying. Riverworld civilization: The first book in the series establishes that the world (or universe) has changed. The thoughtful and natural expository would be to see how humankind and civilization changes with it. Farmer does approach this from an individual level at times - both Burton and Clemens had to reconsider their views toward their own death and the deaths of others. But the social implications are never explored. We're on a new world with a remarkably different metaphysics and this should change how we organize society (at the very least, there should be serious conversations and fledgling attempts at something different). A big part of the drama in The Fabulous Riverboat is the race toward reestablishing human civilization as it was. Essentially, it is a post-apocalyptic novel where mankind is given the opportunity to start over and try something new. Instead, they pursue and rebuild everything exactly the way it was before the apocalypse. This was the greatest failing of the book because the opportunity was so great. Good, speculative fiction would have pursued these larger questions. Far from attempting to answer them, it isn't obvious that Farmer was even aware that there were questions. This is one of those second-in-the-series that refracts your previous preconceptions. If you were positively inclined after reading the first, you can overlook the faults of and at least neutrally pass through the second. If you disliked the first, then you'll notice every flaw and weakness and abandon Riverworld forevermore.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laura Floyd

    I could basically just rewrite the review I left for To Your Scattered Bodies Go for this, so you can go read that here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... But I liked this one less. MORE testosterone, MORE fantastically coincidental alignment of famous (white white WHITE) historic characters, MORE idiotic male philosophizing. And then the book ends and (view spoiler)[Clemens doesn't even GET the boat he spent the WHOLE DAMNED NOVEL building and fighting for, leaving him adrift on the shore I could basically just rewrite the review I left for To Your Scattered Bodies Go for this, so you can go read that here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... But I liked this one less. MORE testosterone, MORE fantastically coincidental alignment of famous (white white WHITE) historic characters, MORE idiotic male philosophizing. And then the book ends and (view spoiler)[Clemens doesn't even GET the boat he spent the WHOLE DAMNED NOVEL building and fighting for, leaving him adrift on the shore swearing revenge at the guy who stole it from him, which revenge is to be carried out right after he builds a new riverboat. (hide spoiler)] Which effectively means that THERE WAS NO POINT IN ANYTHING THAT HAPPENED IN THIS BOOK. FARMER COULD HAVE WRITTEN THE FIRST BOOK AND SKIPPED RIGHT TO THE THIRD BOOK AND YOU WOULD NEVER EVER HAVE NOTICED THAT ANYTHING WAS MISSING IN BETWEEN. Ugh. I put two stars on this review when I started writing it, but I can no longer remember why. This book was dumb. The characters were gross products of both their own and the author's bigoted, chauvinistic times, and even though Farmer makes of point of having Clemens notice that people really can change their entrenched beliefs and behaviors given appropriate time and influence, this ability to change is limited by Farmer's own comprehension of the extents to which humans can better themselves. I'm curious enough about the Ethicals that I think I'll go find the Wikipedia articles about the next two books to see how the series ends, but I am absolutely not subjecting myself to reading another full installment. Ew. (Read as an audiobook on a month of car rides with Dustin, or I never would have finished. I may have nodded off during several of the pointless, endless battle scenes.)

  16. 5 out of 5

    John Loyd

    The Fabulous Riverboat (1971) 256 pages by Philip Jose Farmer. This is like chapter two in Riverworld. It's in the same setting as To Your Scattered Bodies Go, but it follows a second set of characters and doesn't come to a conclusion. No it ends like it was chapter two. The premise of riverworld is that some alien species has taken every human being who ever died on Earth and resurected them on the planet of riverworld. Each person woke up naked and with a bucket. The planet consists of one endle The Fabulous Riverboat (1971) 256 pages by Philip Jose Farmer. This is like chapter two in Riverworld. It's in the same setting as To Your Scattered Bodies Go, but it follows a second set of characters and doesn't come to a conclusion. No it ends like it was chapter two. The premise of riverworld is that some alien species has taken every human being who ever died on Earth and resurected them on the planet of riverworld. Each person woke up naked and with a bucket. The planet consists of one endless river, with the terrain being pretty much the same on both sides of the river. A valley about 10 miles wide, ending at unscalable mountain cliff, and the river in the middle. Along the river every mile is a grailstone. People put their buckets or grails, on the grailstone at regular intervals of the day (like breakfast, lunch and dinner), and the grails will then be filled with food, liquor, tobacco, dreamgum, a towel, etc. Each little area is stocked with 60% of it's population from one time & place, 30% from another and 10% random. When a person is killed in riverworld they are resurrected the next day somewhere else on the river. Since the world contains everyone who has ever lived, Farmer is having some fun by making many of his characters actual historical figures. The first book follows Sir Richard Francis Burton, in real life an English explorer, translator, writer, soldier, orientalist, ethnologist, linguist, poet, hypnotist, fencer and diplomat. So he gets the people in his land to build a boat an he explores the river. Of course as he's traveling other lands are making technological improvements, and his boat eventually gets captured or sunk. Riverboat picks up with Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) traveling on a boat with Bloodaxe and a bunch of eleveth century norsemen. With Sam is his riverworld friend Joe Miller. OK, somehow Farmer came up with the idea that in the very distant past there was a race of humans that was gorilla size or bigger. Joe is of that race, has a huge nose and talks with a lithp, er lisp. Sam has an ambition of building a riverboat, but there is no or very little metal on this planet. As they are travelling a meterorite hits the planet just miles from where they are. The rest of the book is taken up with there struggles to build Sam's dream boat. The struggles being claiming the land where the meteorite hit, finding people to mine for the ore, then refine it. It isn't very long before the neighboring states are inhabited. To Your Scattered Bodies Go wasn't that much better of a book, it won the Hugo, but it was. That book introduced riverworld and different cultures that develop all the river, such as grail slavery -- keeping someone just alive enought so that they can use that person's grail. It was original. The first couple of chapters when they first wake up on riverworld, that can't be replicated. It is good enough that I had to go find book three, The Dark Design, off my shelf and start reading it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Beau Williams

    Very disappointed with this book I may pick up the series again at a later date but this books just didn't help me empathize with its main character. And I love mark twain.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    See my review of "To Your Scattered Bodies Go" if you want to know how I felt about this book. Overall these books weren't bad, per se, but they weren't great either. I don't regret reading these first two books, but I don't think I'll ever get around to reading the other sequels.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I read this because I expected it to just be the second half of To Your Scattered Bodies Go , but it turns out that both books are just the first part of The Dark Design (or so it seems). I liked the overall setting and story - they are sitting on the only iron in the entire Riverworld, which both gives them a huge advantage and makes them a huge target - and they actually have something to work towards. This also puts more of the "sting" back in death, because even though they would come I read this because I expected it to just be the second half of To Your Scattered Bodies Go , but it turns out that both books are just the first part of The Dark Design (or so it seems). I liked the overall setting and story - they are sitting on the only iron in the entire Riverworld, which both gives them a huge advantage and makes them a huge target - and they actually have something to work towards. This also puts more of the "sting" back in death, because even though they would come back once killed, chances are it would be too far away to get back in order to make use of the iron (and there is no more iron on the planet!). I think the goal, creating a riverboat, seems a bit weird. Presumably the geography of the Riverworld is that of a river winding around and around the world, such that in order to go 1 winding-width to the North, you have to circumnavigate the entire planet once; if that's the case, it would make much more sense to build a fleet of zeppelins or airplanes or something, so that you can make the northward journey "as the crow flies". From a character perspective, Joe Miller is great, as were Firebrass, Cyrano and basically most of the rest of the cast except Clemens. I suppose that was part of the point, but it seems strange to me that he was able to build up any kind of power base, considering he didn't seem especially decisive or good at strategy. Spoiler for the ending (view spoiler)[ I think it's a bit strange that Clemens completely saw his betrayal coming and made no preparation for it. He was at his weakest before they took off on the riverboat and at his strongest once he had his mostly hand-picked (or at least randomly-picked) crew on there, particularly since he had always had the best engineers on his side, and even after John's initial plans failed, the Clemens crew still lost. Seriously - have Firebrass do some work personally on the boat to make it so that you at least have the option to sink it at will, or at least prepare for the inevitable backstabbing. Jesus. (hide spoiler)]

  20. 4 out of 5

    David B

    All of humanity has been resurrected along the shores of The Riverworld, though no one knows why. Guided by a rebel from among the ranks of those who created the place, Sam Clemens and his friends build a riverboat like the ones from Clemens' Mississippi days to search out the headwaters of the river and the mysterious castle which is rumored to exist there. In the process, they build a nation and become involved in war and intrigue with their neighbors. I was enjoying this novel. The prose is un All of humanity has been resurrected along the shores of The Riverworld, though no one knows why. Guided by a rebel from among the ranks of those who created the place, Sam Clemens and his friends build a riverboat like the ones from Clemens' Mississippi days to search out the headwaters of the river and the mysterious castle which is rumored to exist there. In the process, they build a nation and become involved in war and intrigue with their neighbors. I was enjoying this novel. The prose is unexceptional, but efficient and workmanlike, and Farmer tells a decent story in an interesting setting. Then Farmer introduces the neighboring state of Soul City and its leader, Elwood Hacking, and derails the whole thing. Hacking is a former slave who is founding an all-black state where "soul brothers and soul sisters can loaf and invite their souls." He is irrational and reactionary. One of his final acts is to rape a white woman and a passage describing them glimpsed in a window together contrasts the woman's "long honey-colored hair and very white skin" with "the bushy hair and black face of Elwood Hacking" in a very distasteful way. Given his fair treatment of other black characters such as Hugo Firebrass and Jill Gulbirra (from the next book in the series), I am not convinced that Farmer is an unqualified racist, but I was puzzled and disquieted by this aspect of the novel.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rob Allen

    One of the best stories I ever read. I know people that read books hear this a lot..."you won't be able to put it down". In this case I found that to be very true. What it says here is a pale shadow to how good it really is. Everyone that has ever lived on Earth is resurrected on a very large planet. This planet has a river that runs all around it. This sets Mr. Farmer (the writer) up to write one hell of a set of stories/books. He can have Vikings fighting alongside of Mark Twain.(etc.) Really, it One of the best stories I ever read. I know people that read books hear this a lot..."you won't be able to put it down". In this case I found that to be very true. What it says here is a pale shadow to how good it really is. Everyone that has ever lived on Earth is resurrected on a very large planet. This planet has a river that runs all around it. This sets Mr. Farmer (the writer) up to write one hell of a set of stories/books. He can have Vikings fighting alongside of Mark Twain.(etc.) Really, it's the perfect stage for someone with Philip Jose' Farmers imagination. The reader can also learn a great deal in a fun way. Anyone that like to read will eat it up. I highly recommend it. All Positive, roballen2 (This review applies to all the books in the "Riverworld" series. I've read them all and each one is great)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    The story of a strange after-life where all the humans who ever lived have been resurrected on a planet dominated by a winding river continues, this time focusing on the adventures of Samuel Clemens, who befriends a gigantic hominid and founds a state with King John of England. Intrigue and double-crossing abound as Clemens attempts to build a vast riverboat to explore Riverworld and confront its creators, while John and neighboring kingdoms hope to subvert Clemens' work in order to gain the boa The story of a strange after-life where all the humans who ever lived have been resurrected on a planet dominated by a winding river continues, this time focusing on the adventures of Samuel Clemens, who befriends a gigantic hominid and founds a state with King John of England. Intrigue and double-crossing abound as Clemens attempts to build a vast riverboat to explore Riverworld and confront its creators, while John and neighboring kingdoms hope to subvert Clemens' work in order to gain the boat for themselves, or at least take advantage of the technological advances resulting from the boat project to conquer their neighbors. Farmer takes his crazy plot so seriously that the reader is still drawn in.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joe Masilotti

    World building: excellent Character development: one-dimensional Racism: high Riverworld, where everyone (ever!) has been resurrected to live out their lives as spry 25 year olds until the end of time. The Fabulous Riverboat continues the series following an author's quest to build a vessel that will take him to the end of the river. What he and his followers do to get there is anything less than savory. There's so much to love about the world of Riverworld. So much that still works today and doesn' World building: excellent Character development: one-dimensional Racism: high Riverworld, where everyone (ever!) has been resurrected to live out their lives as spry 25 year olds until the end of time. The Fabulous Riverboat continues the series following an author's quest to build a vessel that will take him to the end of the river. What he and his followers do to get there is anything less than savory. There's so much to love about the world of Riverworld. So much that still works today and doesn't sound antiquated. But the story itself and the characters moving the plot don't do it justice. It wasn't bad enough to stop reading the series but I hope #3 picks up steam (pun intended) again.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ensiform

    This one is a little better written than the first. Mark Twain and a prehistoric giant find a meteorite and built a vast metal boat, the only one on Riverworld. Still no women characters, and in my opinion, too many invented characters when he has the entirety of history to play with. The dialogue in this book is more realistic. Still, I think Farmer is one of those writers who is incapable of having characters speak in any way and with any mindset other than his, Farmer's, own. Thus there is li This one is a little better written than the first. Mark Twain and a prehistoric giant find a meteorite and built a vast metal boat, the only one on Riverworld. Still no women characters, and in my opinion, too many invented characters when he has the entirety of history to play with. The dialogue in this book is more realistic. Still, I think Farmer is one of those writers who is incapable of having characters speak in any way and with any mindset other than his, Farmer's, own. Thus there is little real ideological conflict, which is a gaping absence in a place like Riverworld.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    This, the second volume of Farmer's Riverworld series, follows Richard Burton's narrative in To Your Scattered Bodies Go and precedes The Dark Design. Samuel L. Clemens, aka Mark Twain, is the protagonist of this novel. While the concept of the Riverworld mightily impressed me at the outset of the first volume, successive stories began to drag. Sure, there's a mystery--a lot of mysteries!--to be solved, but nothing was quite so exciting as the concept which set the stage for the series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Charles Harrison

    This book in a weird way reminds me of playing strategy games like the CIV series. It is all about resource allocation. Spend to much building wonders and your neighbors will stomp you into the ground. Too much on trade and you won't have any left to build. Combine this with 'rebuilding civilization' themes which are always a favorite and some politics and espionage makes this an excellent sequel.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chip

    Reminded me a lot of the John Carter books. Books tends to get tied up describing a lot of detail and sometimes repetitious. But it does have fun characters and a fair bit of action (be it war). The romance isn't well done. Technology is surprisingly accurate for an almost 45 year old book. Not sure if I'll read anymore.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    Adds a new dimension to the expression "sell someone down the river". Oh, and in this novel Hermann Goering is a good guy.

  29. 4 out of 5

    KayMac

    Riverworld series (books 1-5) Review An “IMO” review, if you’re looking for a description of the Riverworld or plot summary Wikipedia does the trick. I enjoyed Riverworld (1-4 at least), though its not the kind of series that left me scrambling for the next book. The premise is unique and very interesting, the author does a lot with it. However, as the series progresses the pacing and narrative quality declines with an almost geometric exactness. If the first book is “five stars” the last book is Riverworld series (books 1-5) Review An “IMO” review, if you’re looking for a description of the Riverworld or plot summary Wikipedia does the trick. I enjoyed Riverworld (1-4 at least), though its not the kind of series that left me scrambling for the next book. The premise is unique and very interesting, the author does a lot with it. However, as the series progresses the pacing and narrative quality declines with an almost geometric exactness. If the first book is “five stars” the last book is “one star”. OK, so the series starts out strong and declines over time. As a reader I have zero patience for filler or fluff. That is, expository digressions that have little or nothing to do with advancing the story. If these narrative departures serve to fill out a character that’s one thing, but if I find myself 20 pages into a meandering trip down some nobody's memory lane I start to get frustrated. That’s the primary weakness of the later books in my opinion, and what made the last book “Gods of Riverworld” all but unreadable. I can overlook impossible technological leaps (of which there are many), nonsensical economics, or improbable motivations because, hey, its science fantasy! But I cannot stand filler! The whole story comes to a standstill for dozens of pages at a time (40+ pages in one case I bothered to count in “Gods”) because a trivial character who does nothing important gets demented-old-lady-on-the-bus levels of exposition. Filler! Fluff! Aimless boring irrelevant drivel! That’s why the last book gets only 1 star, it’s a poor conclusion to a series that started out so strong. Nearly all the characters with dialog are genuine historical figures. Some of these characters behave true to their historical selves (Burton, Rotten John), some undergo intriguing changes (Herman Goering becomes a pacifists after years of spiritual/moral anguish), and others seem to have a cartoonish quality or just plain retarded (such as Sam Clemens aka Mark Twain). I’m not familiar with all the historical characters, but I do know a thing or two about Clemens and Burton. Burton was a sort of real-life Indiana Jones, only much much cooler. He’s one of those larger than life people for whom the saying “you cant make this stuff up” seems to have been invented. His character is the backbone of the five-book series, making most of the important discoveries, outwitting or fighting the antagonists etc., which is fitting. But then we also get Mark Twain/Sam Clemens… Clemens is perhaps the second most important protagonist, and one of the book series’ greatest weaknesses. Clemens is portrayed as a dithering, avaricious, childish man who seems to run his own advanced eponymous nation (Twain-land in Esperanto) on the Riverworld just because the author wanted it to be so. In fact, he is far less interesting or likeable than Rotten John with whom he shares power for a time. Clemens makes all the wrong moves, alienates all the wrong people, snatches defeat from the jaws of victory so many times I nearly gave up the series because of him. While the author’s prose are seldom elegant, Clemens’ lines and actions make him appear to have brain damage, which is frustrating since the actual historical Clemens was justifiably famous in his own lifetime for wit and human insight. In the books, he is thoroughly unlikable and not in a rascally Southern way either. Eventually he dies for good, to the reader’s indescribable relief… Riverworld is a passable five book series that could have been made great if heavily abridged into a two or three book series. Don’t bother with the last book “Gods of Riverworld” at all, just don’t…

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Schmehl

    As with the first Riverworld novel my review disparages the book much, much less than other reviewers. I admit that The Fabulous Riverboat isn't perfect, but I have to ask "What book IS perfect?". I found Philip Jose Farmer's second Riverworld novel to be perhaps the most compelling book I've ever read. It was very enjoyable, interesting, and thrilling. The paperback copy I read came out in 1971. A lot of comparisons can be made to other works, but this story predates all of those that I can thin As with the first Riverworld novel my review disparages the book much, much less than other reviewers. I admit that The Fabulous Riverboat isn't perfect, but I have to ask "What book IS perfect?". I found Philip Jose Farmer's second Riverworld novel to be perhaps the most compelling book I've ever read. It was very enjoyable, interesting, and thrilling. The paperback copy I read came out in 1971. A lot of comparisons can be made to other works, but this story predates all of those that I can think of. Most notably The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen gathers together many known characters and personas from history--Victorian era. This book series preceded that one by thirty years. The main difference is that Farmer uses real people; whereas Alan Moore uses fictional characters. The plot sounds absolutely crazy! Samuel L. Clemens is resurrected on an alien world with one river zig-zagging its way across the entire planet. Everyone who ever lived on Earth from three million B.C. to A.D. 2008 has come back to life along this river. Sam has a dream of constructing a mighty riverboat to travel the length of the river and find the tower at the headwaters. He, like most people, would like to know what is going on! Who are the mysterious beings or "Ethicals" who have begun this experiment. What's in it for them? Why Earth people? What will be the fate of the Riverworld poulation? Sam is forced into a horribly uneasy alliance with bad King John of England. Yes, that King John of Magna Carta fame. Along the way in running a country with the dishonest and morally corrupt John Sam meets some famous folks including Cyrano de Bergerac, Odysseus, Mozart, and others. Some things in the book may seem dated, but that doesn't diminish its creativity or intriguing analysis of human nature.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.