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A blend of science fiction and stylish mystery noir featuring a robot detective: the stand alone sequel to Made to Kill Another golden morning in a seedy town, and a new memory tape for intrepid PI-turned-hitman--and last robot left in working order-- Raymond Electromatic. When his comrade-in-electronic-arms, Ada, assigns a new morning roster of clientele, Ray heads out int A blend of science fiction and stylish mystery noir featuring a robot detective: the stand alone sequel to Made to Kill Another golden morning in a seedy town, and a new memory tape for intrepid PI-turned-hitman--and last robot left in working order-- Raymond Electromatic. When his comrade-in-electronic-arms, Ada, assigns a new morning roster of clientele, Ray heads out into the LA sun, only to find that his skills might be a bit rustier than he expected.... Killing is My Business is the latest in Christopher's noir oeuvre, hot on the heels of the acclaimed Made to Kill. "Robot noir in 60s Los Angeles? You had me at 'Hello.'" —John Scalzi, New York Times bestselling novelist on Made to Kill


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A blend of science fiction and stylish mystery noir featuring a robot detective: the stand alone sequel to Made to Kill Another golden morning in a seedy town, and a new memory tape for intrepid PI-turned-hitman--and last robot left in working order-- Raymond Electromatic. When his comrade-in-electronic-arms, Ada, assigns a new morning roster of clientele, Ray heads out int A blend of science fiction and stylish mystery noir featuring a robot detective: the stand alone sequel to Made to Kill Another golden morning in a seedy town, and a new memory tape for intrepid PI-turned-hitman--and last robot left in working order-- Raymond Electromatic. When his comrade-in-electronic-arms, Ada, assigns a new morning roster of clientele, Ray heads out into the LA sun, only to find that his skills might be a bit rustier than he expected.... Killing is My Business is the latest in Christopher's noir oeuvre, hot on the heels of the acclaimed Made to Kill. "Robot noir in 60s Los Angeles? You had me at 'Hello.'" —John Scalzi, New York Times bestselling novelist on Made to Kill

30 review for Killing Is My Business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    I ripped through the first book wildly enthused and I began this with nearly as many talons at the ready, but even though I'm giving this a solid four stars because it's a nearly perfect "undercover PI infiltrating a mob boss's organization" Noir Mystery. I only knocked off a star because some of the middle-action was a bit repetitious and there was obviously a lot less cool fifties-robot-revolution stuff except near the end, but I suppose that couldn't have been helped because of the nature of I ripped through the first book wildly enthused and I began this with nearly as many talons at the ready, but even though I'm giving this a solid four stars because it's a nearly perfect "undercover PI infiltrating a mob boss's organization" Noir Mystery. I only knocked off a star because some of the middle-action was a bit repetitious and there was obviously a lot less cool fifties-robot-revolution stuff except near the end, but I suppose that couldn't have been helped because of the nature of the story. Even so, I had a good time and the slow reveals burned nicely and kept me thinking about where and who and what was going to happen next... still questioning what might have already been happening because of Ray's little memory problem. :) Seriously. 24 hours is too short a time for all that short-term memory stuff. :) But it still makes for a great page turner! He is, after all, the real man of steel. :) This stuff really does hit the spot. I love Mystery/SF blends like this. Popcorn SF at its best. Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    “Killing Is My Business” (Ray Electromatic Mysteries) by Adam Christopher is now the fourth entry in this series chronicling the last Robot on earth who began his career as a Private Investigator and has now become a “Kill for Hire robot”. Killing seems to pay much better than Investigating, Although Philip Marlowe was never cast as a killer, and Chandler has publicly stated he hated Science Fiction. The series now consists of: “Brisk Money” - (2014) short story “Made To Kill” – (2015) novel “Standa “Killing Is My Business” (Ray Electromatic Mysteries) by Adam Christopher is now the fourth entry in this series chronicling the last Robot on earth who began his career as a Private Investigator and has now become a “Kill for Hire robot”. Killing seems to pay much better than Investigating, Although Philip Marlowe was never cast as a killer, and Chandler has publicly stated he hated Science Fiction. The series now consists of: “Brisk Money” - (2014) short story “Made To Kill” – (2015) novel “Standard Hollywood Depravity” – (2017) novella “Killing is My Business” – (2017) novel Mr. Christopher tries to model his storytelling technique utilizing Raymond Chandler’s writing style. The stories are set in the late fifties and early sixties California, specifically L. A. and Hollywood. The potential for a limitless wealth of plot is boundless, yet Mr. Christopher utilizes the same “jokes” and “gags” ad nauseam thus placing a damper on the proceedings and the constant repetition becomes a hindrance. As a matter of fact the radioactive plot device is utilized in both novels. Although “killing is My Business” is much better than its predecessor “Depravity” Mr. Christopher’s storyline appears to be a one trick pony.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Clare

    OVERALL AVERAGE RATING: 3.3 World-building: 3/5 The book took place in Hollywood, CA in this alt-universe where robots once lived among people until they didn’t. Raymond Electromatic is the last of his kind, working as a hitman-for-hire with his computerized “boss”, Ada. The world-building in general was slow and gradual and was mostly hidden in small details like in Ray’s observations or descriptions of his past/memories. By the time I reached the end of the book, however, the world-building stil OVERALL AVERAGE RATING: 3.3 World-building: 3/5 The book took place in Hollywood, CA in this alt-universe where robots once lived among people until they didn’t. Raymond Electromatic is the last of his kind, working as a hitman-for-hire with his computerized “boss”, Ada. The world-building in general was slow and gradual and was mostly hidden in small details like in Ray’s observations or descriptions of his past/memories. By the time I reached the end of the book, however, the world-building still felt a little incomplete. Granted, I picked up the second book in the series without having read the first. Maybe there were details in the first book that would have better situated the setting and context of this world for me. Characters: 3.5/5 I felt sorry for Ray. I mean really, he’s supposedly the last robot on Earth with a 24-hour limit to his memory, making him highly susceptible to being used snd manipulated. Christopher actually played with that notion in the book and introduced a nice little plot twist at the end. Ada felt a little one dimensional to me as a character, although the story seemed to suggest there might be more to her than meets the eye. The rest of the cast were mostly typical stock characters you would expect to find in a noir mystery sci-fi crossover set in the 1950s: mobster kingpin and his henchmen, genius scientist, and a secret agent. Unfortunately nothing too remarkable to say about them. Plot: 3.5/5 The premise was interesting but the plot moved a little too slow for my taste. It took about halfway for the story to start getting really interesting. The ending however fell on a very flat note. There were definitely some loose ends that I felt didn’t get resolved. But I don’t know if Christopher did that one purpose. It’s possible that the ending was meant to set us up for the next book. Writing style: 3/5 The writing style was not my favorite. It was just very straightforward and dull and not a lot of descriptive language. It sometimes seemed repetitive as well, but that may have been done to simulate Ray’s memory problem since the story was written from his perspective. Entertainment: 3.5/5 I’ll admit that the book was entertaining towards the end, but I was also very anxious to finish the book just so I could move on to a more compelling read. I am glad I tried it out. It was some new and different for me even though it didn’t turn out quite as I expected.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Ray is the last of his kind, having rolled off the production line before the robotic business went bust for good. Now he's a hitman moonlighting as a private detective. Accompanied by his handler, Ada, a supercomputer, Ray earns a living taking the lives of others. Sounds cold and dark but Ray is anything but. The follow-up to Made to Kill and the novella Standard Hollywood Depravity, provides a glimpse into the murder for hit hitman robot's past on the production line by virtue of a crafty and Ray is the last of his kind, having rolled off the production line before the robotic business went bust for good. Now he's a hitman moonlighting as a private detective. Accompanied by his handler, Ada, a supercomputer, Ray earns a living taking the lives of others. Sounds cold and dark but Ray is anything but. The follow-up to Made to Kill and the novella Standard Hollywood Depravity, provides a glimpse into the murder for hit hitman robot's past on the production line by virtue of a crafty and deliciously devious pulp infused plot. Killing is my Business has an engaging story-line complimented by the fact that Ray has to download information every day given his memory stack fills each day and requires a reboot. Each day is a first for Ray - with just enough information to go on to get the job done. This a particularly important cog in the machine as it contributes heavily to some key plot elements, notably in the later stages of the book. The thing I really like about Killing is my Business, is the way the author, Adam Christopher infuses doubt into the story. Doubt over the contract Ray's been hired, doubt over Ada's intentions, doubt over Ray himself; this is all mixed with a twisting plot that goes much deeper than a typical P.I book. My rating: 4/5 stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    The Shayne-Train

    Another pitch-perfect robot-noir romp with my favorite hard-boiled android gumshoe/hired killer, Ray Electromatic. The scenery, the characters, the dialogue are all straight-up pulp loveliness. Throw that into an achingly convoluted plot, mix with your big metal hands, and you have something great. With Ray Electromatic, it's ALWAYS another beautiful morning in Hollywood. Another pitch-perfect robot-noir romp with my favorite hard-boiled android gumshoe/hired killer, Ray Electromatic. The scenery, the characters, the dialogue are all straight-up pulp loveliness. Throw that into an achingly convoluted plot, mix with your big metal hands, and you have something great. With Ray Electromatic, it's ALWAYS another beautiful morning in Hollywood.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carly

    As a huge fan of both hardboiled/noir and science fiction, Adam Christopher's Ray Electromatic series has been a guaranteed hit with me. Raymond (get it?) is the last of the robots from an aborted attempt to replace various public sector jobs with a silicon workforce. Still supposedly with the "Electromatic Detective Agency," his programming has been altered by the amoral supercomputer Ada (get it?) to transform him into a robotic killer-for-hire. Every twenty-four hours, his magnetic tapes run As a huge fan of both hardboiled/noir and science fiction, Adam Christopher's Ray Electromatic series has been a guaranteed hit with me. Raymond (get it?) is the last of the robots from an aborted attempt to replace various public sector jobs with a silicon workforce. Still supposedly with the "Electromatic Detective Agency," his programming has been altered by the amoral supercomputer Ada (get it?) to transform him into a robotic killer-for-hire. Every twenty-four hours, his magnetic tapes run out and his entire memory is removed and wiped clean. Any book involving a robot running around in a trenchcoat and trying to solve a hardboiled mystery pastiche is bound to go over well with me, and Killing is my Business is no exception. This story, which involves a mafia boss, a mad scientist, government agents, and secret plots galore, is as entertaining as it is wacky and engrossing. One of the things that makes this series so unique is the tension between Ray's hitman programming and his innate desire to be a good detective. He is simultaneously brutal and naive, and the longer he goes before his memory is erased, the more human he becomes. Then there's the tension and hope as his clock runs out, and the sudden shock of the newly-hard, cold, memory-erased Ray. it's a very unique take on the "tarnished knight" and chiaroscuro aspects of hardboiled detective fiction and noir. If any of this sounds intriguing, then the Ray Electromatic series is well worth a look. ~~I received an advanced reader copy of this ebook through Netgalley from the publisher, Tor Books, in exchange for my honest review. Thanks!~~ Cross-posted on BookLikes.

  7. 5 out of 5

    All Things Urban Fantasy

    Review courtesy of All Things Urban Fantasy. Who would have thought that the detached and distant Noir style would perfectly match that of a robot assassin? Ray Electromatic used to be in the detective business but turns out there’s a lot more money to be had killing people. With Ada, his monitoring computer, whispering in his ear, Ray drives around LA fulfilling his contracts. In KILLING IS MY BUSINESS, Ray is hired to take out an old-school crime boss. But predictably, the job is a little more Review courtesy of All Things Urban Fantasy. Who would have thought that the detached and distant Noir style would perfectly match that of a robot assassin? Ray Electromatic used to be in the detective business but turns out there’s a lot more money to be had killing people. With Ada, his monitoring computer, whispering in his ear, Ray drives around LA fulfilling his contracts. In KILLING IS MY BUSINESS, Ray is hired to take out an old-school crime boss. But predictably, the job is a little more complicated than expected. The hook of the novel is the fact that Ray is an unreliable narrator. He’s a computer, theoretically he can be re-programmed at any time. In fact, his memory tapes need to be reset and wiped every day. He relies on previous data to finish his jobs, but there’s always the chance that details are missed or....deleted. The reader only knows as much as Ray and, when Ray's memory gaps get worse, both Ray and the reader are left in the dark. KILLING IS MY BUSINESS closely follows the Noir conventions. There’s the seedy underworld, the goons, the broads, the cigarette that always needs to be lit. There’s a femme fatale who has her own agenda, and who doesn't mind flirting with a robot even though he’s not fully functional. As a huge fan of Raymond Chandler and detective novels, I lapped up every tip of hat. Like all good mysteries, the reveal is slowly-paced and placed within the last few pages of the book. If you’re less of a fan, you might find the novel pacing a little slow. There’s a lot of detecting and surmising and not a lot of action. If you’ve ever had a crush on Nick Valentine from Fallout 4, KILLING IS MY BUSINESS is for you. In fact, it was almost impossible not to imagine the books narrated by the same voice actor. There’s the same 1950/60s aesthetic and the same dry delivery of facts. The book ends on a bit of a cliffhanger, as Ray catches wise to some seedy characters. The immediate stop as Ray recharges his program almost felt disjointed, but readers were prepped for this type of ending throughout the novel. KILLING IS MY BUSINESS was enjoyable from page one. Ray is a fantastic narrator who doesn’t let things like emotions cloud his casework. Sexual content: N/A

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    Received to review via Netgalley; publication date 25th July 2017 I’ve enjoyed the other books and stories in this series a lot, and this is no exception. Take a Raymond Chandler-esque world, and apply one robot trained as a PI who has been somewhat repurposed as an assassin. Add the complication that he runs on limited tapes of memory — 24 hours at a time, no more storage than that. Add his AI handler, Ada, who very clearly has her own agenda — one which doesn’t always align with what their crea Received to review via Netgalley; publication date 25th July 2017 I’ve enjoyed the other books and stories in this series a lot, and this is no exception. Take a Raymond Chandler-esque world, and apply one robot trained as a PI who has been somewhat repurposed as an assassin. Add the complication that he runs on limited tapes of memory — 24 hours at a time, no more storage than that. Add his AI handler, Ada, who very clearly has her own agenda — one which doesn’t always align with what their creators envisioned for them. And, in this book, add the mafia. I started it when I couldn’t sleep, and finished it an hour and a half later, without stopping once. Adam Christopher writes crisply, precisely; there’s no dead patches where you feel like you can put the book down, because if you did, well; something interesting might happen while you aren’t looking. I love the way Christopher uses Ray’s limitations to create parts of the mystery. This isn’t just a book with a detective/assassin who happens to be a robot; the fact that Ray’s a robot is vital to the whole thing. Raymond Chandler’s probably rolling in his grave at the comparison, given he had no great opinion of sci-fi, but I’m not going to worry too much about giving him an unquiet rest. Reviewed for The Bibliophibian.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Fans of MADE TO KILL will already know all about Ray Electromatic, Ada and his line of work. Set in the 1950s, KILLING IS MY BUSINESS is the second in the trilogy based around Ray Electromatic. Part crime fiction, part science fiction, Ray is a robot, Ada is his controlling computer, and together their business, is killing. The first novel MADE TO KILL readers were introduced to Ray, the last robot in America, who covers his hired assassin persona with a day job as a private detective. The trick Fans of MADE TO KILL will already know all about Ray Electromatic, Ada and his line of work. Set in the 1950s, KILLING IS MY BUSINESS is the second in the trilogy based around Ray Electromatic. Part crime fiction, part science fiction, Ray is a robot, Ada is his controlling computer, and together their business, is killing. The first novel MADE TO KILL readers were introduced to Ray, the last robot in America, who covers his hired assassin persona with a day job as a private detective. The trick here is that Ada wipes Ray's memory (? banks) every night so and must therefore be reminded every day by Ada of ... well everything. In the first novel that was an interesting idea, a way of perhaps turning a robotic assassin into something more robotic, with no chance whatsoever to question his allocated profession. By the second novel, not only does it wear a bit thin as an idea, it's not nearly as well executed and there are more than a few "well how would he know that" moments - enough to make you think that the wiping appears to be opportunistically selective at least. KILLING IS MY BUSINESS also has a convoluted idea at the centre of the plot - after a couple of hits go wrong, Ray takes on a job getting close to a mafia boss to learn his secrets before then killing him. Leaving aside the whole idea of Ray not knowing what he'd already gleaned if his memory was constantly being wiped, there's the question of why a mafia boss would get that close to a random private detective robot in the first place. Needless to say for a lot of this novel to work you're going to have to pack up those niggles and file them under "silly fun". Having said that, for this reader the first novel was great fun, this one considerably less so. There's nothing wrong with the writing, nor the mismash of genre's. The fifties feel is spot on, the voices of the character perfect. It's just that the central pillars seem to be tilting. https://www.austcrimefiction.org/revi...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Killing Is My Business is the second book in the LA Trilogy, a crazy mash-up of science fiction and hardboiled mystery, kind of Asimov meets Chandler and belches forth Groundhog Day. The background - which was much better fleshed out in Made to Kill - is that Ray is the last robot on Earth. There were a whole lot of robots, but the concept simply didn’t work out. Ray is the last one and, despite his titanium chest, is not omnipotent. He has memory lapses. With this old early sixties technology, Killing Is My Business is the second book in the LA Trilogy, a crazy mash-up of science fiction and hardboiled mystery, kind of Asimov meets Chandler and belches forth Groundhog Day. The background - which was much better fleshed out in Made to Kill - is that Ray is the last robot on Earth. There were a whole lot of robots, but the concept simply didn’t work out. Ray is the last one and, despite his titanium chest, is not omnipotent. He has memory lapses. With this old early sixties technology, his computer memory tapes are only good for 24 hours and then he wakes up and starts all over. He also is prone to error codes. In any case, the author sticks Ray in Hollywood where he operates a private eye agency with a whirring but charming computer, Ada. Of course, the private eye Business ain’t so lucrative, so Ray and Ray go into the murder-for-hire Business. Filled with tough hoods in sunglasses, slinky dames, and secret agents, Ray’s wild adventures are fun, kitschy, and a tiny bit hardboiled.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    I'm glad I chose to continue with the Ray Electromatic Mysteries despite the first book in the series, Made to Kill, being so mediocre. Killing Is My Business, the second of the full-length novels in the series (there are a few novellas too I believe), is a massive improvement over the first book. Christopher addresses a lot of the flaws the first book had. This one is way more consistent and coherent, has a page-turning plot, and has a great plot twist near the end. The editing also improved mas I'm glad I chose to continue with the Ray Electromatic Mysteries despite the first book in the series, Made to Kill, being so mediocre. Killing Is My Business, the second of the full-length novels in the series (there are a few novellas too I believe), is a massive improvement over the first book. Christopher addresses a lot of the flaws the first book had. This one is way more consistent and coherent, has a page-turning plot, and has a great plot twist near the end. The editing also improved massively from the first book, which was nice to see because the editing in the first book was horrendous. There are still some very minor inconsistencies in the book, like Christopher saying at one point that Ray weighs five hundred pounds and at another that he weighs a thousand. Also, I highly doubt a thousand pound robot could do half the things Ray does in this book, like sit in a leather chair (it creaks a lot but somehow doesn't collapse) or a car (Ray himself has a reinforced car to handle his weight, but he rides in normal cars in the book too), without causing some serious damage. All that aside, this may be the best Adam Christopher book I've ever read. I'm really looking forward to reading the last novel in the series, I Only Killed Him Once. Recommended!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Koeur

    https://koeur.wordpress.com/2017/08/0... Publisher: Tor Publishing Date: July 2017 ISBN: 9780765379207 Genre: SciFi Rating: 3.3/5 Publishers Description: Another golden morning in a seedy town, and a new memory tape and assignment for intrepid PI-turned-hit man—and last robot left in working order—Raymond Electromatic. But his skills may be rustier than he remembered in Killing Is My Business, the latest in Christopher’s robot noir’ , hot on the heels of the acclaimed Made to Kill. Review: This was a r https://koeur.wordpress.com/2017/08/0... Publisher: Tor Publishing Date: July 2017 ISBN: 9780765379207 Genre: SciFi Rating: 3.3/5 Publishers Description: Another golden morning in a seedy town, and a new memory tape and assignment for intrepid PI-turned-hit man—and last robot left in working order—Raymond Electromatic. But his skills may be rustier than he remembered in Killing Is My Business, the latest in Christopher’s robot noir’ , hot on the heels of the acclaimed Made to Kill. Review: This was a real fun read what with the blending of detective/mystery noir and Science Fiction. The movement and characterization synergy created an entertaining story line. Ray’s “killer” programming continues to be not the only mystery in town as he obviously has feelings about a lot of “things”. This just might be a dichotomous plot hole where programming overrides emotive feelings yet are able to coexist? The mystery is not too complicated and is easy to figure. What was confusing was the ending and the lack of resolution. Just a harbinger of more novels in the series. The idea that a robot has it’s surface memory wiped daily leaves the story line in a fugue state. I was always waiting for a larger reveal, where Ray does not upload and wipe, but extends his time and finds that his design has an almost limitless store of memory. It is hard to get on board with the main character when every day is a new one, literally. It is also an easy out for the writer, as events that seem mysterious by forgetful association are later easily solved. I liked the novel but do not think I would read any subsequent novels as Ray will never grow as a character unless he is able to store sufficient life memories.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Riju Ganguly

    When you think about a PI infiltrating a mob and ruining it from the inside, you think of Conan Doyle as in the 'Valley of Fear'. Or, even better, you think of 'Red Harvest'! Instead, you find yourself stuffed with an apologetic killing machine that talks to itself and its controller AI, and keeps talking. Tiresome. Very-very tiresome, without the grim humour or the tautness that such works deserve. When you think about a PI infiltrating a mob and ruining it from the inside, you think of Conan Doyle as in the 'Valley of Fear'. Or, even better, you think of 'Red Harvest'! Instead, you find yourself stuffed with an apologetic killing machine that talks to itself and its controller AI, and keeps talking. Tiresome. Very-very tiresome, without the grim humour or the tautness that such works deserve.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Diabolica

    SOOOOO GOOD. I am actually considering reading the novellas. I absolutely loved this book, the characters are just great. I absolutely loved it. I really hope that he makes another book for this series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Okay...I will admit it right off...I didn't get any of this. It brought back memories for me of Lost In Space but without Will Robinson and Dr. Smith. This robot could have used a Will Robinson. The robot...which really is kinda cute... has a daily memory gap which causes it/him to often repeat and question things...also to tell the same old jokes. The name is rather clever...although I kept expecting a vacuum cleaner. I guess when you are the last of your "species" you can be given some literar Okay...I will admit it right off...I didn't get any of this. It brought back memories for me of Lost In Space but without Will Robinson and Dr. Smith. This robot could have used a Will Robinson. The robot...which really is kinda cute... has a daily memory gap which causes it/him to often repeat and question things...also to tell the same old jokes. The name is rather clever...although I kept expecting a vacuum cleaner. I guess when you are the last of your "species" you can be given some literary slack. There was some funny parts. Sci-fi fans and noir fanatics will more than likely like it a lot more than I did.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    If the films Metropolis and The Big Sleep had a baby, it would look just like this book's plot. Ray Electromatic, the last robot in a world that used to be full of them, was programmed to be a private investigator...but killing pays better. His handler, a computer named Ada, gives him his work orders. She also wipes his memory each night. His most recent job was saving a mafia Don from a restaurant bloodbath a la The Godfather. Once done, he is offered another job by the Don. Ray is then involved If the films Metropolis and The Big Sleep had a baby, it would look just like this book's plot. Ray Electromatic, the last robot in a world that used to be full of them, was programmed to be a private investigator...but killing pays better. His handler, a computer named Ada, gives him his work orders. She also wipes his memory each night. His most recent job was saving a mafia Don from a restaurant bloodbath a la The Godfather. Once done, he is offered another job by the Don. Ray is then involved in a mysterious scheme involving car chases, fake identities and plenty of murder. Originally, I thought this was a parody of 1940's hard-boiled detectives utilizing a kitschy robot. However, it is much more than that. There is real science fiction world building in this novel. It is as if steampunk continued growing until the mid-1960's. The setting and atmosphere are equally gritty and consistent. The plot has the same exuberance for the future as steampunk stories do. The mystery was good though the resolution was a bit obvious (at least to someone who has read as many mysteries as I have). I loved that, though the main plot line was solved, there was a subplot left to be resolved in the next book in the series. I can't wait! I would recommend this book to hard-boiled detective fans but especially to those who enjoy steampunk thrillers like Leviathan and Kraken. Thanks to the publisher, Tor Books, and netgalley for an advanced review copy in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sibil

    Thanks to NetGalley and to the editor. I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. So… I am not a big fan of robots, but I don’t hate them, and when I saw that this was a noir and that there was some sort of subtle humorism in those pages I had to request it! I was curious and I was expecting an enjoyable reading. But I don’t know what happened between us. I just know that I didn’t enjoy the reading as I was expecting. The idea is good and the MC is original, and the humorism Thanks to NetGalley and to the editor. I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. So… I am not a big fan of robots, but I don’t hate them, and when I saw that this was a noir and that there was some sort of subtle humorism in those pages I had to request it! I was curious and I was expecting an enjoyable reading. But I don’t know what happened between us. I just know that I didn’t enjoy the reading as I was expecting. The idea is good and the MC is original, and the humorism is there but… I don’t know. It didn’t click with me and in the end, it was an okay reading, but a little bit… meh? Plain?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Literary Portals

    Review originally published on my blog: https://literaryportals.blogspot.com/... What Made Me Read It "Killing is My Business" is the second novel in the "Ray Electromatic Mysteries" trilogy. Although book #1 "Made to Kill" is mostly a self contained story, it still left a few unanswered questions and hints that there was a lot more to Ada, the AI supercomputer who handles Ray. Not to mention the following novella "Standard Hollywood Depravity" (book #1.5) came with a huge plot hole that seems to Review originally published on my blog: https://literaryportals.blogspot.com/... What Made Me Read It "Killing is My Business" is the second novel in the "Ray Electromatic Mysteries" trilogy. Although book #1 "Made to Kill" is mostly a self contained story, it still left a few unanswered questions and hints that there was a lot more to Ada, the AI supercomputer who handles Ray. Not to mention the following novella "Standard Hollywood Depravity" (book #1.5) came with a huge plot hole that seems to contradict a key event in the first novel. The Plot Raymond Electromatic is the last working robot in an alternate 1960's Hollywood. Originally programmed to be a private detective, Ray changed occupation when his handler Ada, the AI supercomputer in charge of the Electromatic Detective Agency, realized the assassination business paid better. So now Ray is a hitman for hire, with helpful detective skills and a 24hours memory limit that works like a charm in the ways of plausible deniability. After two failed hits - one target falls off his office window on his own volition, the other seems to have disappeared from the face of the Earth - Raymond gets a new contract that deviates from the usual parameters. His target: Zeus Falzarano, a secluded Sicilian mafia boss. His job: to save the life of Falzarano from a planned shootout, infiltrate his impenetrable home, search for an unidentified something that even his client can't tell what it is... and then kill him at the client's convenience. The Good "Killing is My Business" is the second book in the "Ray Electromatic Mysteries" trilogy but it reads as a standalone with a self contained story. There are references to characters and events from book #1 ("Made to Kill") and the two extra novelettes ("Brisk Money" and "Standard Hollywood Depravity"), but the recaps have enough detail that you don't need to read the previous books in order to understand and enjoy this second novel. The story is told in the first person, through the eyes of the main character Raymond Electromatic while on the job. Ray is the last robot in existence and due to the technological limitations of the 1960's in this alternate reality, his memory capacity is limited to 24 hours only, by which time he shuts down to recharge, download the day's events to bigger reel tapes for permanent storage and wipe clean his own smaller unit. So every day is a fresh start for Ray, with no memory of all the previous days. As a result the narrative feels repetitive at times, and as readers, we only experience the plot at the same time and pace as the main character, through his own experience and deductive reasoning. Ray and Ada, the two robotic characters of the series, are colorful and fully developed, they may be artificial but they don't come across as soulless machines. The snarky interactions and dynamic chemistry between the robot and his AI handler, the mental echoes and imaginary sensations Ray gets whenever he communicates with Ada, his doubts concerning the hit jobs and Ada herself, his dismay at all the ultimately irrelevant human mannerisms inherited from his creator through the mental template used to program his positronic brain, his curiosity that leads him to deviate from the plan and go against Ada's orders... the author makes good use of all these elements to give us the sense that both are real persons instead of mere programmed machines. Meant as an homage to Raymond Chandler's noir detective work, "Killing is My Business" is stocked full with the expected clichés: the Sicilian mafia boss and his army of thugs, corrupt city officials and shady real-estate moguls, car chases and mass shootouts, undercover agents, a femme fatale with her own agenda and a foreign mad scientist. The author successfully conveys the mood of the noir genre and the atmosphere of the 50's and 60's Hollywood underworld. The Not So Good This book has a much slower pace than the previous stories, with too many mafia gangsters and not enough robotics, which is what drew me to the series in the first place. The first half of the book drags considerably with extensive detective work (mostly stakeouts) and the infiltration job. The pace starts to pick up in the second half though, with action sequences and the intrigue buildup to the last book of the trilogy - Ray starts to doubt Ada's trustworthiness and questions her real intentions and goals. That's when it finally got interesting... but it's a personal quirkiness of mine. Those who will come for the noir detective angle will probably enjoy this book a lot more than I did. Final Rating 3 of 5 stars "Killing is My Business" is an interesting and unique mix of noir detective and classic sci-fi with plenty of tongue in cheek humor. Recommended for those who enjoy hard-boiled fiction and robot stories set in atmospheric Hollywood of the 1960's.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    Killing Is My Business is robot P.I/recently re-programmed hitbot, Raymond Electromatic’s second outing. I missed out on the first instalment of the trilogy, Made To Kill, so I read this as a stand alone. I really enjoyed this novel for many reasons but two stuck out in the crowd. The first was Christopher’s cool, charming and quirky writing style, he is obviously having a lot of fun with this series and it shows. Secondly I thought that the robot element of this Crime/Noir novel was impressivel Killing Is My Business is robot P.I/recently re-programmed hitbot, Raymond Electromatic’s second outing. I missed out on the first instalment of the trilogy, Made To Kill, so I read this as a stand alone. I really enjoyed this novel for many reasons but two stuck out in the crowd. The first was Christopher’s cool, charming and quirky writing style, he is obviously having a lot of fun with this series and it shows. Secondly I thought that the robot element of this Crime/Noir novel was impressively fleshed out. AC did a great job of keeping the reader’s focus on the fact that we are reading from a robot’s perspective. This made Raymond’s presence in the story meaningful instead of just an eccentricity. Raymond is the last remaining robot from a government project that was shut-down almost immediately after production began. Ray was programmed to be a private investigator but was recently reconfigured to take on assassination contracts. This story begins with Ray stalking a fresh target courtesy of his computer boss Ada at the Electromatic Detective Agency. Before Ray can get to him, the target takes a dive out of his office window and dies on impact. Not common but it does happen. Next on his list is a real estate developer who hasn’t been seen on weeks. Another dead end… Finally Ray gets a contract that will keep him busy. Saving a Mafia boss from a shootout, then becoming his body guard so he can kill him when the client is ready. When Ray saves the life of Zeus Falzarano (great name I know), he is sucked into a plot that will take him right back to the roots of his creation. It is a great plot, fundamentally simple but suits a robotic protagonist well. Ray is an accomplished detective, despite his technological misgivings, and is focused on breaking the case wide open. I thought the pacing was spot-on and the development of Ray’s case to be engaging and filled with mystery. My main problem with the novel was the fact that there is not many characters to invest in, mainly just Ray, as all the secondary characters are hit and miss. With the exception of Ada. I like her as a presence, especially in terms of her dynamic with Ray. It was this duo that kept me reading and I thought their pairing was fascinating. This is where AC’s writing shines and it is brilliant. My favourite element has to be the echos and ghosts in their programming that gives the reader the sense that they are real people instead of just machines. I thought Ray was the perfect protagonist for this story, though it is made clear from the beginning that he is an unreliable narrator due to memory limitations (24 memory tapes). This makes Ray’s own narration of events slightly jumbled up and adds an element of mystery to the story. Ray is interesting lead character with his robotic abilities, enjoyment of human practices such as reading books or eating/drinking (which he can’t actually do) and capabilities as an assassin. I would recommend this novel to those readers who enjoy crime/noir with a twist. In my opinion it is a sucess and I can’t wait for book three!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kate (Looking Glass Reads)

    It may not be immediately obvious from the SFF theme of this blog, but I love a good mystery story. The Ray Electromatic Mysteries by Adam Christopher scratches both itches. Killing is my Business is the second book in this series. It is set in a 1960s noir Los Angeles, features a robot assassin nee private detective, and is more fun than it has any right to be. What can I say? Robots are cool, damn it, and there should be more stories with them. Or maybe it’s my twelve year old self talking. Eit It may not be immediately obvious from the SFF theme of this blog, but I love a good mystery story. The Ray Electromatic Mysteries by Adam Christopher scratches both itches. Killing is my Business is the second book in this series. It is set in a 1960s noir Los Angeles, features a robot assassin nee private detective, and is more fun than it has any right to be. What can I say? Robots are cool, damn it, and there should be more stories with them. Or maybe it’s my twelve year old self talking. Either way, I love this concept. I love this series. And more people should be talking about it. If you haven’t caught up, you can check out the review of the first book here. This is the second novel in the Ray Electromatic Mysteries series, though there are two novellas available as well. This takes places after the events of book one, with Ray getting several new jobs in rapid succession including one very curious one. Instead of the normal assassination job Ray is used to, he is hired to first protect an aging mafia boss from another hit only to kill him later after successfully infiltrating his group. It’s an unconventional request to be sure, but Ray is quite skilled at his job. One of the reasons why I like this series so much is that we have a rather unconventional narrator. Ray is a robot. Not an android or some sort of cybernetic human, but a real, honest to god robot. Even then, Ray isn’t a very conventional robot. Visually, he is a very 1950s-esque take on what a robot would look like (or at least that’s the visual I get). As for function, Ray addresses a problem not often explored. Memory space. That’s right, Ray Electromatic shuts down every 24 hours because he’s run out of batteries and tape reel. Every morning he awakens with no memory of the previous day’s activities, instead relying on the supercomputer that assists in keeping him functional for briefings on yesterday's and today's jobs and activities. This is only becomes more and more relevant as the series goes on. While Ray is quite good at his job – both the assassinating and his old function of private detective (hey, assassination just makes more money) this is a huge potential exploitation. Small things that seem insignificant enough to not warrant a briefing aren’t always conveyed and links in cases can be accidentally overlooked. And that’s just scratching the surface with issues. Now, this memory space element doesn’t bother me in the slightest. On the contrary, I love the concept. However, I can see some readers finding this aspect a bit frustrating. There are times when the reader can piece together events long before Ray does for no other reason than he’s incapable of remembering them. In that same vein, the beginning of the novel can feel just a hair slow. Unlike many mysteries and thrillers this book doesn’t hit the ground running with a thrill a minute. Sure, that aspect is there, but this speculative fiction and, maybe more importantly, this is very much so a noir styled book with dark alleys illuminated by lamplight, mobsters, and discussions in bars. So, if you don’t like books with just a bit of slower pacing, keep this in mind while reading. The case itself was interesting. Ray is left quite in the dark on this one, maybe more so than in the previous novel. Orders filter in only gradually, forcing Ray to think on his feet and revert to his old detective abilities, something that seems hardwired into his core programming. Things become more muddied before becoming clearer. Hints to bigger questions and larger overarching series-wide plots are hinted at in this book. We learn a lot, or at least more than we did in book one, about robots, their history, and Ray in particular. There are several times where, though Ray cannot remember something, he seems to have a sixth sense, some nagging and very human feeling. While this isn’t explored too much, it does pose some interesting questions as to Ray’s true nature, and something which, maybe, hopefully, we will see explored in the future. As for the rest of the interesting information, I’m not going to go into further detail. I don’t want to spoil the story any more than I may already have. Needless to say, I’m very intrigued by some of the occurrences towards the end of the novel and can’t wait to see where the series goes in the next book. (I’m unsure if another book has been announced, but I can’t see another book not being released.) Killing is My Business by Adam Christopher was another fun installment in the Ray Electromatic Mysteries. This series as a whole is a ton of fun. Ray is a great narrator. They are shorter than most speculative fiction, easy to get into, and easy to read. If you like mystery books, robots, and noir this is a book (and series) you’ll want to check out. If you don’t like noir mysteries this one may be a book to skip. *This book was received for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This review and more can be found on Looking Glass Reads.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 3.5 of 5 I love this series. I recently reviewed an anthology of humorous sci-fi novellas and I mentioned that I had been in the mood for some good, fun, and funny sci-fi. That anthology did NOT do the trick, but the Ray Electromatic Mystery series works wonderfully. Raymond Electromatic is a robot. He is the last working robot in a world that once saw robots everywhere, but a law banned the production of robots and Ray is all that This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 3.5 of 5 I love this series. I recently reviewed an anthology of humorous sci-fi novellas and I mentioned that I had been in the mood for some good, fun, and funny sci-fi. That anthology did NOT do the trick, but the Ray Electromatic Mystery series works wonderfully. Raymond Electromatic is a robot. He is the last working robot in a world that once saw robots everywhere, but a law banned the production of robots and Ray is all that remains. And Ray is programmed to be an assassin masquerading as a private detective. Ray has some serious limitations. His internal memory banks are only good for twenty-four hours and then they are erased and reused. Fortunately he has a partner, Ada, a desktop computer that remembers things for Ray and feeds him his orders. In Killing Is My Business, Ray's first target kills himself before Ray can make his move and Ray winds up saving the life of his second target - a classic mobster. Out of gratitude, the mob boss (Zeus Falzarano) brings Ray into his organization. Ray sees it as an opportunity to study his target, and the next day, Ray sees it as an opportunity to study his target, and the next day, Ray sees it as an opportunity ... 24-hour memory span, remember? Author Adam Christopher has taken the classic mystery/noir genre of Sam Spade and Philip Marlowe and tossed it into the future world of Asimov and Clarke, where robots are a reality, and mixes in the wackiness of Ron Goulart to create his own very unique world. This is the third book in the series that I've read and I find them to just be a lot of fun ... nothing too serious but with enough mystery to keep me interested. This particular book is perhaps y least favorite of the three. While the first third of the book was strong and fast and exciting, and the ending was a delight, the middle portion of this already short book was a bit repetitive. I was eagerly turning pages but then disappointed as we didn't really seem to be moving the plot forward. Still, this is definitely the sort of book I would take along on a trip - something somewhat light and quick to read, but with a story that catches my attention and characters that make me smile Looking for a good book? Killing is My Business by Adam Christopher is part of the delightful Ray Electromatic Mystery series and it will make you chuckle while a robot is killing people. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher, through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    Ray Electromatic is the last of the robots, and while that is exceptional, his career as a private investigator turned assassin is what make the stories more interesting. I really enjoyed Made to Kill, the first book in the series, and I went on a jag and read the other three stories over the last few days. The most recent, Killing is My Business, relies on you to have read the other books to get some of the stuff that Ray misses due to the essential gimmick of his setup (which was supposed to h Ray Electromatic is the last of the robots, and while that is exceptional, his career as a private investigator turned assassin is what make the stories more interesting. I really enjoyed Made to Kill, the first book in the series, and I went on a jag and read the other three stories over the last few days. The most recent, Killing is My Business, relies on you to have read the other books to get some of the stuff that Ray misses due to the essential gimmick of his setup (which was supposed to have been rendered moot at the end of Made to Kill, but I digress): at the end of each day Ray goes to his office, plugs in, changes his tapes, and wakes up with no memory of the previous day except for what is in permanent storage. This was interesting in Made to Kill, but is sort of threadbare as a concept at this point in the series. Unlike the shorter novellas, Brisk Money and Standard Hollywood Depravity, Killing is My Business is novel length, and still manages to feel a bit rushed and harried for that. The setup is great, the twists and turns of the events are interesting, but it ultimately fails to capture the heights of what made Made to Kill an excellent read. Partly because Ray has completely dropped the fiction of being a detective and is now just a plain murder-bot, and partly because the continuing issue of his memory feels out of place since it should have been resolved. All in all I wanted to like this one a lot more than I did.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Clair

    Ray Electromatic, is the last robot. He works as as a Private Investigator but as the pay is better he sidelines as a hitman under the guidance of a supercomputer, Ada. Every 24 hours his memory tape run out and he has to be reset by Ada with data for his current assignment. Here the action packed novel begins as we follow Ray as he begins his current task to infiltrate a gang and kill the boss. This book is great robotic fun. A quick and easy read with plenty of laughs. Filled with robots, explo Ray Electromatic, is the last robot. He works as as a Private Investigator but as the pay is better he sidelines as a hitman under the guidance of a supercomputer, Ada. Every 24 hours his memory tape run out and he has to be reset by Ada with data for his current assignment. Here the action packed novel begins as we follow Ray as he begins his current task to infiltrate a gang and kill the boss. This book is great robotic fun. A quick and easy read with plenty of laughs. Filled with robots, explosions, car chases, gangsters, murder and a huge dollop of noir. A crime mystery with little twists alongside the main plot line that keeps everything entertaining. There’s even a touch of “what does it mean to be human” philosophy thrown in. It doesn’t take itself seriously and there is a lot of tongue in cheek humour. Ray is a brilliantly lovable character, fun, witty and endearing as he overcomes everything the world throws at him. I haven’t read the first novel in the series but this did not seem to matter at all I enjoyed it as a standalone book. I’d recommend it to: fans of robots, crime noir, and anyone who wants a fun read to brighten their day. I received a free advanced reader copy via Netgallery in return for an honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Seth Tomko

    The book is a fun bit of robot noir if such a genre exists outside of Adam Christopher's books. The plot isn't too complicated aside from the 24 hour memory tape of protagonist, and it takes an odd, personal turn for a character that claims to have no real personality, just a program. If the book was harder into the science-fiction, it would certainly be more of an exploration of what it means to be human. As it stands, the theme isn't really developed. On a different note, I was confused by this The book is a fun bit of robot noir if such a genre exists outside of Adam Christopher's books. The plot isn't too complicated aside from the 24 hour memory tape of protagonist, and it takes an odd, personal turn for a character that claims to have no real personality, just a program. If the book was harder into the science-fiction, it would certainly be more of an exploration of what it means to be human. As it stands, the theme isn't really developed. On a different note, I was confused by this book's status as a sequel to Made to Kill. Without delving into spoilers, there is a significant change to Raymond's hardware by the end of the first novel that is in no way reflected in this one. I considered the possibility that the books aren't following a chronological order, which would be a interesting meta-technique addressing not only serialized story telling but also Raymond's own condition wherein much of his memory is erased every 24 hours. However, events from the first novel are referenced in the course of Killing is My Business forcing me to conclude they are in order. If so, there is a significant oversight in the condition of the narrator-protagonist that I find troublesome, even with my laissez-faire attitude toward continuity.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    (I received a free uncorrected proof of this book from Goodreads.) I like detective stories, noir, and robots, so this book started off from a strong position. Our narrator, Ray Electromatic, is the last robot left, and it's working as a PI/hitman under the guidance of a supercomputer, Ada, that handles their cases and assignments. It's the late 1960s, so the supercomputer has miles of magnetic tape and modules the size of refrigerators; Ray itself recharges overnight and its own memory tapes are (I received a free uncorrected proof of this book from Goodreads.) I like detective stories, noir, and robots, so this book started off from a strong position. Our narrator, Ray Electromatic, is the last robot left, and it's working as a PI/hitman under the guidance of a supercomputer, Ada, that handles their cases and assignments. It's the late 1960s, so the supercomputer has miles of magnetic tape and modules the size of refrigerators; Ray itself recharges overnight and its own memory tapes are only good for a day, so it starts every day new, getting a brief from the supercomputer. Ray is hired to infiltrate a gang and kill the mob boss. Things, of course, don't go as planned. Along the way, Ray has to deal with a South American femme fatale, g-men, and more. I liked this book, even more than I expected to. The story is good, the writing is very good, and there's a little bit of Blade Runner-style "what does it mean to be human" going on. Game value: Extremely high.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    I like sci-fi, I like assassins, I like robots so it seemed natural that this series of books would be right up my alley. Overall all the themes were there and I generally liked the story but it does have some faults that kept me from totally enjoying the story. -The story leaves too many threads unaddressed. The ending was unsatisfying as a result. -The "memory reset" plot device is holding the series back at this point. -I can't help but compare this series to "The Automatic Detective" which wa I like sci-fi, I like assassins, I like robots so it seemed natural that this series of books would be right up my alley. Overall all the themes were there and I generally liked the story but it does have some faults that kept me from totally enjoying the story. -The story leaves too many threads unaddressed. The ending was unsatisfying as a result. -The "memory reset" plot device is holding the series back at this point. -I can't help but compare this series to "The Automatic Detective" which was a more enjoyable read for me. Recommended for readers who enjoyed the earlier Ray Eletromatic stories, however if it is your first time in this robot noir genre I would check out The Automatic Detective instead.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tim Hicks

    Robot detective is also a hitman? OK, you have my attention. Plus: The what-the-heck-is-going-on plot. The general tone. Minus: The whole have-to-recharge-nightly-no-memory thing If it's the 60s, and we're buying the understandable reel-to-reel tapes, why are we allowed a battery technology that can recharge overnight to power a huge robot? How can a machine running mostly on tapes have the ability to react to real-time stimuli? I was a computer operator in the 60s, and I don't buy this. Why can' Robot detective is also a hitman? OK, you have my attention. Plus: The what-the-heck-is-going-on plot. The general tone. Minus: The whole have-to-recharge-nightly-no-memory thing If it's the 60s, and we're buying the understandable reel-to-reel tapes, why are we allowed a battery technology that can recharge overnight to power a huge robot? How can a machine running mostly on tapes have the ability to react to real-time stimuli? I was a computer operator in the 60s, and I don't buy this. Why can't he at least write his onboard memory to tape for access when needed? Just because he might be too capable otherwise? OK, but if your time is limited and you have another book I might suggest that you read that one first.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lauren LaTulip

    A genre and mind-bending caper featuring the last robot in America, Raymond Electromatic, as a private eye. Watch as Ray solves the case, gets the girl and all the answers...or not. Because Ray has a problem - only 24 hours of built in memory. Killing is My Business, like the first book in the series, Made to Kill, is a quick and easy read, but gives you all the feels and all the laughs. Adam Christopher impressively weaves together noir, with its trademark mid-twentieth century California settin A genre and mind-bending caper featuring the last robot in America, Raymond Electromatic, as a private eye. Watch as Ray solves the case, gets the girl and all the answers...or not. Because Ray has a problem - only 24 hours of built in memory. Killing is My Business, like the first book in the series, Made to Kill, is a quick and easy read, but gives you all the feels and all the laughs. Adam Christopher impressively weaves together noir, with its trademark mid-twentieth century California setting, and the classic questions of science fiction with a healthy dose of slapstick and puns. Very enjoyable.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarai

    So where I went wrong with this book is I missed out on the first book. That being said I had no idea this wasn't the first book until I found out on goodreads. That being said I have to say I didn't feel like I was missing out on anything. I enjoyed reading this "noir mystery" about a robot in the 50's who is the world as a hired hitman. Who solves crimes but only remembers 22 hours. Do I have your attention now because that is what caught mine other then the fact that this is a basic mystery w So where I went wrong with this book is I missed out on the first book. That being said I had no idea this wasn't the first book until I found out on goodreads. That being said I have to say I didn't feel like I was missing out on anything. I enjoyed reading this "noir mystery" about a robot in the 50's who is the world as a hired hitman. Who solves crimes but only remembers 22 hours. Do I have your attention now because that is what caught mine other then the fact that this is a basic mystery wrapped in an action wrapped in a robot. I enjoyed it a 100% and I can't wait to go back and read the first one. I think that the series should keep going for sure.

  30. 4 out of 5

    TJS

    I know I'm pedantic. I sometimes wish I were less so. That quality stopped me from reading this novel after I found, in the early going, chaise longue misspelled as chaise lounge (p. 32) and discreet as discrete (p. 34). I did skim ahead and found some strange Spanish. A character says "no estar bueno," which means "for it not to be good." (P. 190.) ¡Ay, caramba! Beyond that, I doubt I'd enjoy the plot. People who kill for financial gain aren't appetizing to read about, unless it's in a thriller i I know I'm pedantic. I sometimes wish I were less so. That quality stopped me from reading this novel after I found, in the early going, chaise longue misspelled as chaise lounge (p. 32) and discreet as discrete (p. 34). I did skim ahead and found some strange Spanish. A character says "no estar bueno," which means "for it not to be good." (P. 190.) ¡Ay, caramba! Beyond that, I doubt I'd enjoy the plot. People who kill for financial gain aren't appetizing to read about, unless it's in a thriller in which they're hunted down. I have the impression that that vocation is celebrated in this novel. Back to the library it goes.

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