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Racketeer for Life: Fighting the Culture of Death from the Sidewalk to the Supreme Court

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Joseph M. Scheidler has fought for the unborn since the Supreme Court allowed abortion on demand with its 1973 Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton rulings. He was the target of a lawsuit brought by the National Organization for Women under federal racketeering laws. Found guilty in 1998, Scheidler triumphed twice in appeals before the Supreme Court in 2003 and again in 2006. Rac Joseph M. Scheidler has fought for the unborn since the Supreme Court allowed abortion on demand with its 1973 Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton rulings. He was the target of a lawsuit brought by the National Organization for Women under federal racketeering laws. Found guilty in 1998, Scheidler triumphed twice in appeals before the Supreme Court in 2003 and again in 2006. Racketeer for Life explains how a former Benedictine monk and journalism professor was drawn into pro-life activism and describes his part in the history of the pro-life movement in the United States. Conversations, protests, and battles with clinic directors, doctors, politicians, judges, media personalities, and even other pro-lifers are woven together in this engaging account of the efforts of Scheidler and other activists to publicize the horrors of abortion, influence legislation, and, ultimately, to save lives. Pro-life work has taken Scheidler around the globe. He’s crossed paths with some of the most famous leaders in recent decades, from President Ronald Reagan to St. John Paul II. Join sit-ins at abortion clinics, take part in rallies, listen to heated debates, and sit in a federal courtroom with one of the most dedicated warriors in the fight for the unborn as he shares his energy, wit, and faith in this engaging memoir.


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Joseph M. Scheidler has fought for the unborn since the Supreme Court allowed abortion on demand with its 1973 Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton rulings. He was the target of a lawsuit brought by the National Organization for Women under federal racketeering laws. Found guilty in 1998, Scheidler triumphed twice in appeals before the Supreme Court in 2003 and again in 2006. Rac Joseph M. Scheidler has fought for the unborn since the Supreme Court allowed abortion on demand with its 1973 Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton rulings. He was the target of a lawsuit brought by the National Organization for Women under federal racketeering laws. Found guilty in 1998, Scheidler triumphed twice in appeals before the Supreme Court in 2003 and again in 2006. Racketeer for Life explains how a former Benedictine monk and journalism professor was drawn into pro-life activism and describes his part in the history of the pro-life movement in the United States. Conversations, protests, and battles with clinic directors, doctors, politicians, judges, media personalities, and even other pro-lifers are woven together in this engaging account of the efforts of Scheidler and other activists to publicize the horrors of abortion, influence legislation, and, ultimately, to save lives. Pro-life work has taken Scheidler around the globe. He’s crossed paths with some of the most famous leaders in recent decades, from President Ronald Reagan to St. John Paul II. Join sit-ins at abortion clinics, take part in rallies, listen to heated debates, and sit in a federal courtroom with one of the most dedicated warriors in the fight for the unborn as he shares his energy, wit, and faith in this engaging memoir.

33 review for Racketeer for Life: Fighting the Culture of Death from the Sidewalk to the Supreme Court

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was a fascinating memoir about Joe Scheidler's years fighting abortion. Okay, although I'm very pro-life, I don't agree with all the tactics Joseph Scheidler uses – when I read 99 Ways to Stop Abortion I thought some of the things he suggested were unethical or counterproductive. But I went into this knowing that a lot of the way he is demonized by pro-choice factions is unjustified. He was tried in front of the Supreme Court in a lawsuit that alleged he was committing organized crime (rack This was a fascinating memoir about Joe Scheidler's years fighting abortion. Okay, although I'm very pro-life, I don't agree with all the tactics Joseph Scheidler uses – when I read 99 Ways to Stop Abortion I thought some of the things he suggested were unethical or counterproductive. But I went into this knowing that a lot of the way he is demonized by pro-choice factions is unjustified. He was tried in front of the Supreme Court in a lawsuit that alleged he was committing organized crime (racketeering) for preventing abortions and blocking abortion clinics with the people in his organization and in Operation Rescue. It was a groundless lawsuit, and I'm glad he was vindicated – some of the deeply unethical things the prosecution did were maddening and I'm glad he's written this book to get his side of the story out. Also shocking was the way students behaved when he tried to speak on campus. I know many pro-lifers have been harassed at speaking engagements, but what he recounted is truly shocking. In the book, he had a lot of interesting stories to tell.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

    This is a memoir of a pro-life activist who believe in "direct action" (e.g. picketing abortion clinics) and who was involved in a decades long and legally dubious racketeering case. A lot of what he writes about the life of an activist is probably generally applicable to activists of all causes, but understandably the book will appeal most to people who care about the abortion issue. Some of the most memorable parts of the book were the stories about his pre-activist life in the 1950s and 1960s This is a memoir of a pro-life activist who believe in "direct action" (e.g. picketing abortion clinics) and who was involved in a decades long and legally dubious racketeering case. A lot of what he writes about the life of an activist is probably generally applicable to activists of all causes, but understandably the book will appeal most to people who care about the abortion issue. Some of the most memorable parts of the book were the stories about his pre-activist life in the 1950s and 1960s, which give a sense of just how different a world it was back then. For example, at one point Schiedler was in the seminary but was unsure whether he really wanted to become a priest. He was sent to a psychiatrist, who gave him truth serum and asked him questions about his mother. I don't think you could get away with doing that these days. One of the drawbacks of the book is that it skips around a lot in time to no obvious purpose, which makes the end of the book (where he wins his court case) pretty anticlimactic.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Silvia Foti

  4. 5 out of 5

    Pam Roehl

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dolores Pribble

  6. 4 out of 5

    William F

  7. 4 out of 5

    Abby

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Rust

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Palma-simoncek

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tricia McKenna

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  12. 5 out of 5

    C.L.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Reppy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mckenzie

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katie Tahuahua

  19. 5 out of 5

    Katie Moore

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Grace

  22. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bruno

  24. 5 out of 5

    KW

  25. 4 out of 5

    Donna

  26. 5 out of 5

    Julie Hryniewicz

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alex Richmond

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cecelia

  30. 5 out of 5

    S

  31. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Dull

  32. 4 out of 5

    Rob Watts

  33. 5 out of 5

    Takisha

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