counter create hit The Long Space Age: The Economic Origins of Space Exploration from Colonial America to the Cold War - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Long Space Age: The Economic Origins of Space Exploration from Colonial America to the Cold War

Availability: Ready to download

An economic historian argues that privately funded space exploration is not a new development, but a trend beginning with the astronomical observatories of the nineteenth century  Over the last half-century there has been a rapid expansion in commerce off the surface of our planet. Nations and corporations have placed hundreds of satellites that provide billions of dollars An economic historian argues that privately funded space exploration is not a new development, but a trend beginning with the astronomical observatories of the nineteenth century  Over the last half-century there has been a rapid expansion in commerce off the surface of our planet. Nations and corporations have placed hundreds of satellites that provide billions of dollars’ worth of communications, scientific, global positioning, and commercial services, while construction has been completed on humanity’s ninth and largest space station. On the planet itself, government agencies, corporations, and individuals plan for the expansion of economic development to the lunar surface, asteroids, and Mars. The future of space exploration seems likely to include a mix of large government funded missions as well as independent private-sector missions. The Long Space Age examines the economic history of American space exploration and spaceflight, from early astronomical observatories to the International Space Station, and argues that the contemporary rise of private-sector efforts is the re-emergence of a long-run trend not a new phenomenon.


Compare
Ads Banner

An economic historian argues that privately funded space exploration is not a new development, but a trend beginning with the astronomical observatories of the nineteenth century  Over the last half-century there has been a rapid expansion in commerce off the surface of our planet. Nations and corporations have placed hundreds of satellites that provide billions of dollars An economic historian argues that privately funded space exploration is not a new development, but a trend beginning with the astronomical observatories of the nineteenth century  Over the last half-century there has been a rapid expansion in commerce off the surface of our planet. Nations and corporations have placed hundreds of satellites that provide billions of dollars’ worth of communications, scientific, global positioning, and commercial services, while construction has been completed on humanity’s ninth and largest space station. On the planet itself, government agencies, corporations, and individuals plan for the expansion of economic development to the lunar surface, asteroids, and Mars. The future of space exploration seems likely to include a mix of large government funded missions as well as independent private-sector missions. The Long Space Age examines the economic history of American space exploration and spaceflight, from early astronomical observatories to the International Space Station, and argues that the contemporary rise of private-sector efforts is the re-emergence of a long-run trend not a new phenomenon.

48 review for The Long Space Age: The Economic Origins of Space Exploration from Colonial America to the Cold War

  1. 4 out of 5

    May Ling

    Summary: The book does actually cover the period after the cold war. I like that it lays out the costs and puts the context of space spending into a much longer history that pre-dates the launches in the 60s. Very cool. p. 4 - It talks about the idea that space observators (early exploration) was funded privately. p. 19 - gives the totals spent along with an adjustment for inflation. He also gives the GDP equivalent, which is kind fo important to get a sense for just how much that wealth might hav Summary: The book does actually cover the period after the cold war. I like that it lays out the costs and puts the context of space spending into a much longer history that pre-dates the launches in the 60s. Very cool. p. 4 - It talks about the idea that space observators (early exploration) was funded privately. p. 19 - gives the totals spent along with an adjustment for inflation. He also gives the GDP equivalent, which is kind fo important to get a sense for just how much that wealth might have meant to the period. p. 28 - John Adam was a huge proponent of space. He saw it as part of our relationship with knowing God. p. 69- It's like he's hinting at the idea that income disparity drives some of the best environments for spending on space exploration. There is something to this as the concentration of wealth is required for the types of decision making, given a non-corporate structure of spending. p. 79 - This is very instructive in speaking about Lowell, he's donating 25% of income (Don't know what he had in assets and if that was passive and active income, likely most of his income is passive). They do say his inherentence gave him $100k annually per year in 1903 terms. He's giving up $25k to fund the effort. Be interesting to have known the taxation implications on this as well. p. 82 - George Ellery Hale - this guy raised so much money for space research, it's crazy. he just basically courted every rich person of the period and tried to get some sort of inheritance allocation. Amazing! p. 105 - Dr. Robert H. Goddard - This guy was great at the actual science, but his real skill was getting funding. Wow, these stories are incredible and worth making one feel something to aspire to as far as requisitioning capital to a particular endeavor. He saw military funding as crucial after reading war of the worlds. That was smart, as the Cold War had just resulted in a desire to spend loads of money on blowing things up. His research is a mix as a result. p. 153 - He's leaving his patents and partnership with the Curtis Wright foundation. They are partnering with the Gugginheims to make sure that any royalties from the patents go to increasing research in space. p. 208 - He talks about getting the rich to fund space as a re-emerging trend rather than a novel one. That's fair p. 216 - He's putting his book in the context of those that think it should only be private. The period where it wasn't private at all saw the biggest advance in putting people into space. So the solution is likely in between, maybe depends on how you get the most talented people. Whatever system does that wins. p. 223 - the bequest from Elias Loomis (a memoir of Elias Loomis) was the largest from Yale at the time. I may need read more on this in general.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Moritz Mueller-Freitag

    Alex MacDonald’s contrarian book The Long Space Age challenges the dominant narrative of American space exploration as an inherently governmental activity. MacDonald, who was recently appointed Chief Economist at NASA, argues that private space enterprises like Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin are not an entirely new phenomenon, but something of an American tradition. As evidence, he points to the American astronomical observatories of the 19th century and Robert Goddard’s experime Alex MacDonald’s contrarian book The Long Space Age challenges the dominant narrative of American space exploration as an inherently governmental activity. MacDonald, who was recently appointed Chief Economist at NASA, argues that private space enterprises like Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin are not an entirely new phenomenon, but something of an American tradition. As evidence, he points to the American astronomical observatories of the 19th century and Robert Goddard’s experimental rockets in the 1920s as two examples of space efforts that were driven by individuals and predominantly funded by the private sector. The decision to incorporate astronomical observatories into the overall narrative of American space history is an interesting one. MacDonald argues that telescopes and robotic space missions, while very different technologies, are effectively equivalent in motivation and complexity: They both extend our vision into space and are of considerable complexity. Some observatories, like the Lick Observatory or the Palomar Observatory, were even similar in cost (in 2015 GDP-ratio equivalent terms) to major NASA missions, such as the Messenger probe to Mercury or the Mars Exploration Rovers. MacDonald’s framework of the “Long Space Age” thus broadens our understanding of the history of space exploration. To quote the author, “In the long historical perspective, the American movement out into space is much more than the story of “one ­giant leap” by its government in ser­vice of geopo­liti­cal competition; it is a cumulative story of the many small steps of its ­people, some taken with the support of their government, but many of the most impor­tant supported by private resources and individual ­will alone.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    (I'm writing this review of the book as a mass-market book - if it were intended as a purely academic work, I would probably rate it more highly) Although it’s a good book that makes interesting points, I feel there’s a mismatch between the work and a mass-market audience that might leave a lot of readers disappointed. The book reads like a dissertation project, which I believe will probably be * too dry * too focused on listing supporting evidence instead of a clear and compelling flow, and * too (I'm writing this review of the book as a mass-market book - if it were intended as a purely academic work, I would probably rate it more highly) Although it’s a good book that makes interesting points, I feel there’s a mismatch between the work and a mass-market audience that might leave a lot of readers disappointed. The book reads like a dissertation project, which I believe will probably be * too dry * too focused on listing supporting evidence instead of a clear and compelling flow, and * too insistent on the significance and novelty of the author’s findings to be an enjoyable read for most, even those with a layman’s interest in the subject. The author’s main findings were that * Rather than being a new phenomenon, private investment in space dates back more than 200 years, to cutting edge observatories financed by wealthy donors * Signaling, not prestige, is the demand-side driver of space exploration I found the first point to be the most interesting one, and the author does provide good evidence. I still didn’t walk away feeling completely convinced that the new perspective the author gives is the “right” one. As a reader I also got really bogged down in anecdote after anecdote about how individual observatories came to be financed. The difference between signaling and prestige seemed too subtle to be as interesting to me as the first point. While I get the difference, it doesn’t seem big enough for me to know that it’s actually a novel idea. Overall a good book that makes an interesting argument, but one that I feel will seem like "work" to most readers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Greason

    Fascinating and potentially important historical work. Treats observatories, early rocket experiments, the cold war, and touches on recent efforts. I particularly like his theme of the importance of 'signaling' in how both private and public funds are spent. He makes but does not emphasize that individuals want to do these things and so they find ways to fund them, while the ways vary. Recent efforts are just mentioned, and it is a US only work. A but dry in spots but a must read for serious stu Fascinating and potentially important historical work. Treats observatories, early rocket experiments, the cold war, and touches on recent efforts. I particularly like his theme of the importance of 'signaling' in how both private and public funds are spent. He makes but does not emphasize that individuals want to do these things and so they find ways to fund them, while the ways vary. Recent efforts are just mentioned, and it is a US only work. A but dry in spots but a must read for serious students of space policy

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kms

    人类何时开始?为什么开始探索太空? 1958年美国艾森豪威尔任期内,由James Killian 领导的PSAC(Presidential Science Advisory Committee)出台一份名为“Introduction to Outer Space"的报告,报告中对美国进行太空探索重要性的论述给出四项理由: 一、人类探索未知世界的强烈冲动与好奇心; 二、加强军事上的自卫能力; 三、增强国家荣誉感; 四、科技发展有助于进一步认识宇宙。 作者针对上述理由列举了诸多不同的观点: 一、所谓的冲动和好奇来自某些人(John Quincy Adams,GeorgeElleryHale, Robert Goddart)而非作为整体的人类;而如此“冲动”的归根结底是经济因素; 二、太空探索的军事动机不可与发展科技相提并论,从50年代起,众多政客都从军事视角来看到太空科技的重要性;冷战时期国家荣誉感亦很突出; 三、参与太空项目的大多是科学家,但是其中科技发展并不单纯而是在为政治服务。 一本大众可以接受的学术著作。

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Great historical view of space exploration This is a needed change in how we view space exploration. It’s also short and to the point, which is unusual for an academic book like this.

  7. 4 out of 5

    James Slifierz

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marc

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Tanous

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Pearson

  11. 4 out of 5

    Peter C. Bigley

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Wilson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

  14. 5 out of 5

    Raiyan Ahsan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kamil Muzyka

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  18. 5 out of 5

    Viktorija

  19. 5 out of 5

    David J.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ashton Patton

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jaso

  22. 5 out of 5

    Steve Walker

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Arnold

  24. 5 out of 5

    David De

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lulli

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dеnnis

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ethan Chitty

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mike Slifierz

  31. 5 out of 5

    Günther

  32. 4 out of 5

    Ray

  33. 4 out of 5

    Tony Anuci

  34. 5 out of 5

    Jiří Volek

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

  36. 4 out of 5

    Nate Stender

  37. 4 out of 5

    Kimberley

  38. 4 out of 5

    Ciarán

  39. 5 out of 5

    Lin Ding

  40. 4 out of 5

    Marcela Chao

  41. 4 out of 5

    Tom Hoseason

  42. 4 out of 5

    Maharjan Aman

  43. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Peugh

  44. 5 out of 5

    Poly Hunter

  45. 4 out of 5

    Elise

  46. 5 out of 5

    Silvana

  47. 4 out of 5

    Harsh Vardhan

  48. 4 out of 5

    Michael

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.