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Trojan Horse in the City of God: The Catholic Crisis Explained

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Uncover the philosophical and theological roots of the issues that rock the Church today; come to understand why Catholics get so heated about them. This acclaimed 1967 work has become an international classic because of its ability to go beyond the liberal/conservative impasse to the heart of the Catholic crisis.


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Uncover the philosophical and theological roots of the issues that rock the Church today; come to understand why Catholics get so heated about them. This acclaimed 1967 work has become an international classic because of its ability to go beyond the liberal/conservative impasse to the heart of the Catholic crisis.

30 review for Trojan Horse in the City of God: The Catholic Crisis Explained

  1. 4 out of 5

    Robert Federline

    The Councils of the Church were called at various times in history in order to combat a heresy or to otherwise clarify an important matter of Church Teaching. Man's ingenuity, however, is virtually endless. He is able to invent error virtually at will, which is why heresies have been combated since the very beginning of the Church. It is interesting, therefore, how swiftly following the Second Vatican Council this book was written. Its purpose, of course, is to guard against, and to correct, misi The Councils of the Church were called at various times in history in order to combat a heresy or to otherwise clarify an important matter of Church Teaching. Man's ingenuity, however, is virtually endless. He is able to invent error virtually at will, which is why heresies have been combated since the very beginning of the Church. It is interesting, therefore, how swiftly following the Second Vatican Council this book was written. Its purpose, of course, is to guard against, and to correct, misinterpretations of the documents of Vatican II. The devil has always worked against God's creation and the Salvation he offers to us. He continues in this effort by attempting to sow confusion. Anytime there is a major movement in the Church, such an opportunity for confusion presents itself. Vatican II was called not to change the Church, but to correct misunderstandings and to insure that the teachings of the Church were understood and, more importantly, were properly understood in the current times. This book explains how the True Church did not change, but many have tried to change it. There is a difference between translating the Bible into modern language, accommodating the changes in vocabulary and idioms and the meanings of particular words, and rewriting the very words of the Bible. A mark of a timeless work is that it is always timely. This book, 45 years old, is still cutting-edge current. Dietrich von Hildebrand patiently takes his readers through various secular philosophies. He carefully explicates the issues of Faith and the moral eternal teachings of the Catholic Church and how others attempt to coopt these teachings and lead others astray by the subtle use of vocabulary. One must always look to the substance of what is said, and not be misled by the pleasant sound of the words. Hildebrand lived through the horrors of National Socialism and saw firsthand the evils of communism. He warns against the union of the Church with such ideologies. At the same time, it is not a full endorsement of capitalism. He presciently warned of the crisis within the Church engendered by historical relativism and temporal parochialism. He cogently set forth the difference between the study of science and science fetishism, and their relationship to Faith. Ultimately, this book is not only a strong defense of the Catholic Faith, but is a warning sign and a guidepost to help the faithful avoid being misled by popular fads in thinking and in the secular world. It is also a reminder that Christ has called us to be a sign of contradiction in the world, and that the way of the World is frequently not the way of God. While the thoughts are deep, the writing is very readable and are set forth in a fashion that is at once persuasive and accessible.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Robin Damgaard

    This is an excellent book. The author was not out to make friends in writing it, apparently. He covers all the philosphical and theological problems in the Church in the Vatican II era. It's exceptionally clear and simple, devout and charitable, but not pretty: he lines up and knocks down a complete list of heresies, with special attention to those of Teilhard de Chardin. Mind you, I'm not sure that anyone takes him de Chardin seriously anymore, which might be a shortcoming of this book: it was This is an excellent book. The author was not out to make friends in writing it, apparently. He covers all the philosphical and theological problems in the Church in the Vatican II era. It's exceptionally clear and simple, devout and charitable, but not pretty: he lines up and knocks down a complete list of heresies, with special attention to those of Teilhard de Chardin. Mind you, I'm not sure that anyone takes him de Chardin seriously anymore, which might be a shortcoming of this book: it was written in the sixties, and could be a bit dated. Anyway, I would recommend it for thinking laymen.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gyoza

    Dietrich von Hildebrand explains the philosophical errors behind the misinterpretation of the documents of Vatican II and how they led to changes in the liturgy/ other religious practices of Catholics--and not for the better. I'm a Catholic who was born long after the council, so I have no firsthand experience of the preconciliar church; however I'm also a classical music and vintage movie aficionado who learned something about what it was like by listening to sacred music by various composers a Dietrich von Hildebrand explains the philosophical errors behind the misinterpretation of the documents of Vatican II and how they led to changes in the liturgy/ other religious practices of Catholics--and not for the better. I'm a Catholic who was born long after the council, so I have no firsthand experience of the preconciliar church; however I'm also a classical music and vintage movie aficionado who learned something about what it was like by listening to sacred music by various composers and watching old film footage. I definitely learned a lot reading this book. Dr. von Hildebrand must have been a great professor. He writes clearly and concisely such that even I, with no philosophical training, could follow his arguments.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cornelius Pulung

    A brief and concise introduction to the changes that happened after the Second Vatican Council. If you think Iota Unum by Romano Amerio is too heavy to digest, then Trojan Horse must be easy-to-read book because it offers straightforward analysis. It's a must-read book for Catholic traditionalist who wants to get an overall picture of the errors that infect the post-concilliar Church and how to combat them. A brief and concise introduction to the changes that happened after the Second Vatican Council. If you think Iota Unum by Romano Amerio is too heavy to digest, then Trojan Horse must be easy-to-read book because it offers straightforward analysis. It's a must-read book for Catholic traditionalist who wants to get an overall picture of the errors that infect the post-concilliar Church and how to combat them.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael P

    The quote that sums up this book pretty well is: "We wish to repeat emphatically: there is no closed, homogenous epoch in history; there is no 'modern man.' And most important of all, man always remains the same in his essential structure, in his destiny, in his potentialities, in his desires, and in his moral dangers; and this is true notwithstanding all the changes that take place in the external conditions of his life. There is and has been but one essential historical change in the metaphysic The quote that sums up this book pretty well is: "We wish to repeat emphatically: there is no closed, homogenous epoch in history; there is no 'modern man.' And most important of all, man always remains the same in his essential structure, in his destiny, in his potentialities, in his desires, and in his moral dangers; and this is true notwithstanding all the changes that take place in the external conditions of his life. There is and has been but one essential historical change in the metaphysical and moral situation of man: the advent of Christ and the salvation of mankind and reconciliation with God through Christ's death on the Cross."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Victor

    This is a very good book that anyone who is Catholic probably should read. I do not understand why material like this was not taught in my Catholic high school. While this is not only for Catholics, it is helpful if you have an interest in the Second Vatican Council. It spends a lot of time going into detail on what happened and how some people improperly interpreted it. If you are neither Catholic nor interested in the Second Vatican Council, you might find this book to be a bit dull.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Davis

    Great book. Would have been good to include more primary citations. He very thoroughly outlines the various fronts in which “the termites” are working to devour the Church’s bulwarks from the inside. There is a reason this went out of print, and it wasn’t because it wasn’t relevant.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    A must read for everyone interested in the Catholic Church and the cataclysm that followed the Second Vatican Council.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Justyna

    4,5!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paul Schmitt

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jipson

  12. 5 out of 5

    Seth

  13. 5 out of 5

    R. Valle

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marac

  15. 4 out of 5

    Connor Loesch

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rico McCahon

  17. 5 out of 5

    John Andrew Seymour

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Scott

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jesuswept1333

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  22. 4 out of 5

    kurp

  23. 5 out of 5

    T

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pecoemla

  27. 4 out of 5

    Walter Steinwald

  28. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Marshall

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joel

  30. 5 out of 5

    Susan

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