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The Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit (and When to Stick)

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A New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal bestseller In this iconic bestseller, popular business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin proves that winners are really just the best quitters. Godin shows that winners quit fast, quit often, and quit without guilt--until they commit to beating the right Dip. Every new project (or job, or hobby, or company) start A New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal bestseller In this iconic bestseller, popular business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin proves that winners are really just the best quitters. Godin shows that winners quit fast, quit often, and quit without guilt--until they commit to beating the right Dip. Every new project (or job, or hobby, or company) starts out fun...then gets really hard, and not much fun at all. You might be in a Dip--a temporary setback that will get better if you keep pushing. But maybe it's really a Cul-de-Sac--a total dead end. What really sets superstars apart is the ability to tell the two apart. Winners seek out the Dip. They realize that the bigger the barrier, the bigger the reward for getting past it. If you can beat the Dip to be the best, you'll earn profits, glory, and long-term security. Whether you're an intern or a CEO, this fun little book will help you figure out if you're in a Dip that's worthy of your time, effort, and talents. The old saying is wrong--winners do quit, and quitters do win.


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A New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal bestseller In this iconic bestseller, popular business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin proves that winners are really just the best quitters. Godin shows that winners quit fast, quit often, and quit without guilt--until they commit to beating the right Dip. Every new project (or job, or hobby, or company) start A New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal bestseller In this iconic bestseller, popular business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin proves that winners are really just the best quitters. Godin shows that winners quit fast, quit often, and quit without guilt--until they commit to beating the right Dip. Every new project (or job, or hobby, or company) starts out fun...then gets really hard, and not much fun at all. You might be in a Dip--a temporary setback that will get better if you keep pushing. But maybe it's really a Cul-de-Sac--a total dead end. What really sets superstars apart is the ability to tell the two apart. Winners seek out the Dip. They realize that the bigger the barrier, the bigger the reward for getting past it. If you can beat the Dip to be the best, you'll earn profits, glory, and long-term security. Whether you're an intern or a CEO, this fun little book will help you figure out if you're in a Dip that's worthy of your time, effort, and talents. The old saying is wrong--winners do quit, and quitters do win.

30 review for The Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit (and When to Stick)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Liaken

    This is a short book. Despite being short, it is very repetitive. It also advocates the philosophy that nothing is worth doing if you're not going to be #1, which is a philosophy I disagree with. However, I did find the basic concepts of this book to be interesting, even helpful. So, here's the nutshell of the book, in the book's own words. Now you don't have to read it. :-) Excerpts from The Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit by Seth Godin Most of the time, we deal with the obstacle This is a short book. Despite being short, it is very repetitive. It also advocates the philosophy that nothing is worth doing if you're not going to be #1, which is a philosophy I disagree with. However, I did find the basic concepts of this book to be interesting, even helpful. So, here's the nutshell of the book, in the book's own words. Now you don't have to read it. :-) Excerpts from The Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit by Seth Godin Most of the time, we deal with the obstacles by persevering. Sometimes we get discouraged and turn to inspirational writing, like stuff from Vince Lombardi: "Quitters never win and winners never quit." Bad advice. Winners quit all the time. They just quit the right stuff at the right time. Most people quit. They just don't quit successfully. (pg. 3) Strategic quitting is the secret of successful organizations. Reactive quitting and serial quitting are the bane of those that strive (and fail) to get what they want. And most people do just that. They quit when it's painful and stick when they can't be bothered to quit. There are two curves that define almost any type of situation facing you as you try to accomplish something. (A couple of minor curves cover the rest.) Understanding the different types of situations that lead you to quit-or that should cause you quit--is the first step toward getting what you want. CURVE 1: THE DIP Almost everything in life worth doing is controlled by the Dip. At the beginning, when you first start something, it's fun. You could be taking up golf or acupunture or piloting a plane or doing chemistry--doesn't matter; it's interesting, and you get plenty of good feedback from teh people around you. Over the next few days and weeks, the rapid learning you experience keeps you going. Whatever your new thing is, it's easy to stay engaged in it. And then the Dip happens. The Dip is the long slog between starting and mastery. A long slog that's actually a shortcut, because it gets you where you want to go faster than any other path. (pgs. 16-17) Important Note: Successful people don't just ride out the Dip. THey don't just buckle down and survive it. No, they lean into the Dip. They push harder, changing the rules as they go. Just because you know you're in the Dip doesn't mean you have to live happily with it. Dips don't last quite as long when you whittle at them. CURVE 2: THE CUL-DE-SAC The Cul-de-Sac (French for "dead end") is ... a situation where you work and you work and you work and nothing much changes. It doesn't get a lot better, it doesn't get a lot worse. It just is. That's why they call those jobs dead-end jobs. There's not a lot to say about the Cul-de-Sac except to realize that it exists and to embrace the fact that when you find one, you need to get off it, fast. That's because a dead end is keeping you from doing something else. The opportunity coast of investing your life in something that's not going to get better is just too high. That's it. Two big curves (a bonus, the Cliff, follows). Stick with the Dips that are likely to pan out, and quit the Cul-de-Sacs to focus your resources. That's it. CURVE 3: THE CLIFF (RARE BUT SCARY) Cigarettes, it turns out, were redesigned by scientists to be particularly addictive. ...Except for that nasty drop-off at the end (otherwise known as emphysema), smoking is a marketer's dream com true. Because smoking is designed to be almost impossible to quit, the longer you do it, the better it feels to continue smoking. The pain of quitting just gets bigger and bigger over time. I call this curve a Cliff--it's a situation where you can't quit until you fall off, and the whole thing falls apart. It's no wonder that people have trouble stopping. The thing is, a profession in selling isn't like smoking cigarettes. Neither is making it as a singer or building a long-term relationship with someone you care about. Most of hte time, the other two curves are in force. The Dip and the Cul-de-Sac aren't linear. They don't spoon feed you with little bits of improvement every day. And they're just waiting to trip you up. If It Is Worth Doing, There's Probably a Dip(pgs. 19-21) The Cul-de-Sac and the Cliff Are the Curves That Lead to Failure If you find yourself facing either of these two curves, you need to quit. Not soon, but right now. The biggest obstacle to success in life, as far as I can tell, is our inability to quit these curves soon enough. (pg. 22) It's okay to quit, sometimes. In fact, it's okay to quit often. You should quit if you're on a dead-end path. You should quit if you're facing a Cliff. You should quit if the project you're working on has a Dip that isn't worth the reward at the end. Quitting the projects that don't go anywhere is essential if you want to stick out the right ones. You don't have the time or the passion or the resources to be the best in the world at both. Quitting a Tactic vs. Quitting a Strategy Yes, I know it's heretical, but I'm advocating quitting. Quitting often, in fact. Not giving up and abandoning your long-term strategy (wherever you might be using that strategy--a career, an income, a relationship, a sale) but quitting the tactics that aren't working. Getting off a Cul-de-Sac is not a moral failing. It's just smart. Seeing a Cliff coming far in advance isn't a sign of weakness. Instead, it represents real insight and bravery. It frees up your energy for the Dip. (pgs. 59-60) "Never Quit" What a spectacularly bad piece of advice. It ranks up there with "Oh, that's a funny dirty joke, let's tell the teacher!" Never quit? Never quit wetting your bed? Or that job you had at Burger King in high school? Never quit selling a product that is now obsolete? Wait a minute. Didn't that coach say quitting was a bad idea? Actually, quitting as a short-term strategy is a bad idea. Quitting for the long term is an excellent idea. I think the advice-giver meant to say, "Never quit something with great long-term potential just because you can't deal with the stress of the moment." Now that's good advice. Pride Is the Enemy of the Smart Quitter Richard Nixon sacrificed tens of thousands of innocent lives (on both sides) when he refused to quit the Vietnam war. The only reason he didn't quit sooner: pride. The very same pride that keeps someone in the same career years after it has become unattractive and no fun. The very same pride that keeps a restaurant open long after it's clear that business is just not going to pick up. When you're facing a Cul-de-Sac, what's your reason for sticking? Are you too proud to quit? One reason people feel really good after they quit a dead-end project is that they discover that hurting one's pride is not fatal. You work up the courage to quit, bracing yourself for the sound of your ego being ripped to shreds--and then everything is okay. If pride is the only thing keeping you from quitting, if there's no Dip to get through, you're likely wasting an enormous amount of time and money defending something that will heal pretty quickly. (pgs. 64-65)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    It's all pretty obvious, but I saw a copy of this 80-page book lying around at work and figured that I could use something to read in the gym. The main point doesn't even need that much space to get across: persistence is overrated; if one doesn't expect long-term success in something (be it a career, relationship, or whatever), it's better to quit immediately than stick with it. The Dip is the hard slog between being barely competent at something ("beginner's luck" is the phrase Godin uses) and It's all pretty obvious, but I saw a copy of this 80-page book lying around at work and figured that I could use something to read in the gym. The main point doesn't even need that much space to get across: persistence is overrated; if one doesn't expect long-term success in something (be it a career, relationship, or whatever), it's better to quit immediately than stick with it. The Dip is the hard slog between being barely competent at something ("beginner's luck" is the phrase Godin uses) and being the best in the world at it, and if you're not going to be able to slog through it, you should give up and try something else. One interesting point that Godin makes that I hadn't thought much about before is that while being well-rounded and good at most things is beneficial in school (I believe that the example he uses is that getting straight Bs is viewed as being better than getting Cs and Ds plus an A or two), it doesn't matter in adult life, where those who are most rewarded are those who excel in a particular field. No one cares whether Barry Bonds can write an essay or how fast Salman Rushdie can wheeze his way around a track.

  3. 4 out of 5

    WhatIReallyRead

    I'll save you the bother of reading this book. Seth Godin's whole point is this: Only do the things you're going to be the best in the world at. If you won't be the best in the world at them - quit right now (if you've already started) or don't start (if you haven't yet). Which is laughable for several reasons. From the point where you start something to the point when you make an accomplishment, a whole bunch of things happens: - the world changes (the market, the economy, the demand/supply ra I'll save you the bother of reading this book. Seth Godin's whole point is this: Only do the things you're going to be the best in the world at. If you won't be the best in the world at them - quit right now (if you've already started) or don't start (if you haven't yet). Which is laughable for several reasons. From the point where you start something to the point when you make an accomplishment, a whole bunch of things happens: - the world changes (the market, the economy, the demand/supply ratio, etc.) - you change The degree and characteristics of that change are impossible to predict. Before you take up ballet, you can't know how well your body will stretch and adapt to the demands of a new way of moving. YOU JUST CAN'T KNOW THAT. The whole point of going on a road is that it reveals itself during the process. If you've ever made a long-lasting prediction that proved to be accurate, it was just a coincidence. You can know before you start whether or not you have the resources and the will to get to the end. It's pretty easy to determine whether something is a Cul-de-Sac or a Dip. (c) No, you can't. No, it's not easy. Not even close. I can't believe the amount of power he thinks a feeble human brain has. Maybe he's never tried to make a mathematical model for predicting things and just doesn't know what he's talking about. It's easy to be a CEO. What's hard is getting there. (c) No, it's not easy being a CEO, you dumbass! The other thing I have an issue with: not all the things we do are done for excellence. He says: The mature thing is not even to bother starting to snowboard because you're probably not going to make it through the Dip. And the stupid thing to do is to start, give it your best shot, waste a lot of time and money, and quit right in the middle of the Dip. Yeah, dude, have you ever heard of a thing called a recreational sport? I'm pretty sure most people take up snowboarding to relax and switch from their main line of work, not to become the Olimpic champion. ... the wrongest thing might very well be this: Being well rounded is the secret to success. How often do you look for someone who is actually quite good at the things you don't need her to do? How often do you hope that your accountant is a safe driver and a decent golfer? Um, okay. You may not need your accountant to be a safe driver. But she needs to be a safe driver for herself. The point of being well-rounded is not to pave the road to success. The point is wellness. What kind of life is a person is going to have if they are awesome at accounting and horrible at everything else? Sure, from a certain level, she might get a driver and a team of people to all the other stuff for her. But to do that, she would need to survive somehow to build that career. "Skim through the questions and answer the easiest ones first, skipping ones you don't know immediately." Bad advice. Superstars can't skip the ones they don't know. Um. Wow. Yeah, if you have a choice to get all the answers - by all means, do. But if you're not a superstar, get at least some questions right instead of getting stuck on one you don't know the answer to. Jeez. All in all, most of this book was unbearably dumb bullshit, which stands no criticism. He did have a few nice-ish points, so I'm giving it two stars, but generally, it was a waste of time, and I wouldn't recommend it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    LilyCReads

    My rating is not final. I haven't decided what my opinion on this is yet My rating is not final. I haven't decided what my opinion on this is yet

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anu

    Read the book in an hour while waiting out rush hour traffic at the bookstore. While it wasn't a complete waste of time for me (I actually needed to hear some of the things Godin says in the book), the book definitely repeats the same message over and over again, sometimes using the exact same words. There were a few points I thought worth noting, and I jotted them down on a small napkin. If you're interested in this book, I suggest you save your time and read my napkin instead :). Read the book in an hour while waiting out rush hour traffic at the bookstore. While it wasn't a complete waste of time for me (I actually needed to hear some of the things Godin says in the book), the book definitely repeats the same message over and over again, sometimes using the exact same words. There were a few points I thought worth noting, and I jotted them down on a small napkin. If you're interested in this book, I suggest you save your time and read my napkin instead :).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Yaz

    Notes I took: The Dip. - "Zipf's law" (1st place and 2nd place aren't exactly very close in winnings) • Being the very best matters - since everyone is looking for the very best, the reward for it is enormous! - only a few spots up there.. • Each individual's "best in the world" is different depending on factors that matter to them. - "Best" is subjective - don't need to be the best at everything! Pick the RIGHT thing and do it all the way.. More places to win, stakes are higher! • Don't hope to succe Notes I took: The Dip. - "Zipf's law" (1st place and 2nd place aren't exactly very close in winnings) • Being the very best matters - since everyone is looking for the very best, the reward for it is enormous! - only a few spots up there.. • Each individual's "best in the world" is different depending on factors that matter to them. - "Best" is subjective - don't need to be the best at everything! Pick the RIGHT thing and do it all the way.. More places to win, stakes are higher! • Don't hope to succeed because you're the only one being considered. Know when to "quit" and when to "refuse to settle" Don't be mediocre at everything! Two types of quitting: Strategic and Reactive Quitting. Two curves for any situation: 1- (The Dip) -Everything in life worth doing is controlled by the dip (or has a dip) -don't just endure the dip, lean into it, push harder, change the rules. - just because you know you're in the dip doesn't mean u have to live happily with it .. 2- (The Cul De Sac) - french for "dead end" - you Work work work nothing much changes.. - when you spot it, get off it fast! - It's keeping you away from doing something else..Focus your resources on something worth it. 3- (The Cliff) -Bonus -You can't quit till you fall off, and the whole thing falls apart. - The dip creates scarcity, scarcity creates value. -Success comes thru times with ability to push through the moments where it's just easier to quit. - both the cliff and caldesac lead to failure. Our biggest obstacle in life is the ability to quit those two > Either go full power or quit Success -The dip is secret to Success because those who push through it aren't settling for what they got, they refuse to abandon the quest and they're embracing the challenge. >Brave choice: give it all and win >Mature choice: not waste resources, save it for a true passion. >Stupid choice: start, give it your best, waste resources, then quit in the dip. (Avoid this common one) - The "wind" problem. The unpredictable factor that changes exactly when you don't want it to. - The reason we're here is to solve the hard problems. - Be happy wind issue exists because without it you're easily replaceable! "The dip is the reason you're here" • It's not enough to survive through the dip. You get what you deserve when you embrace it and treat it like the opportunity that it really is. - Woodpecker peck 20 times on thousand trees an get no where but 'keep himself busy' Or, peck 20,000 times at One tree and gets himself dinner? - Quitting is DIFFICULT. Requires you to admit that you're never going to be no. 1 in the world. (at least not at this..) - sometimes the dip is too big, too deep to get through with the resources you have available. Step 1: Knowing that you're facing a dip. ABS **you're always using your muscles.. But they don't grow. Because you quit using them at the point where the stress would cause them to start growing. Natural reaction because stressed muscle hurts and (feels unsafe) but it's This Reflex that creates scarcity.. • Quitting when you hit the dip is a bad idea. If the journey you started was worth doing, quitting now will just waste all the resources you already invested. -Quitting a lot in the dip makes you a Serial Quitter: one that starts many things but accomplishes little. (If u can't make it thru the dip, DON'T START) -know the journeys you choose.. A "superstar" is the best in the world at what she does" Want to be a superstar? Choose the field with the "steep dip" because not a lot will. But you have to get through it to the other side.. -Not enough: need to also quit the cul-de-sacs that are currently sucking away from you. You Fail to become "best in world" when: -run out of time (quit) -run out of money (quit) -get scared (quit) -not serious about it (quit) -lose interest or enthusiasm or settle for MEDIOCRE. (quit) -focus on short term not long term (quit when short gets hard) -you chose the wrong thing (because u dot have the talent for it) Eight Dip curves to watch out for: - Manufacturing Dip - Sales Dip - Education Dip - Risk Dip (invest to get through dip, or investing in a risky crapshoot?) - Relationship Dip - Conceptual Dip - Ego Dip (it's easier when it's all about you. Giving up control and leaning into organization gives you leverage: most people can't give up control or spotlight, they're stuck!) - Distribution Dip • See the curve in advance and quit the Cul-de-sac. -Nothings wrong with optimism. Pain comes when optimists have to make hard choices while stuck in the dip. "..if you can keep going when the system is expecting you to stop, you will achieve extraordinary results." If your going to quit, quit before you start. Reject the system. Don't play the game if you realize you can't be the best in the world! - When faced with the dip, most people suck it up and try to Average their way to success. The temptation to be average is jus another kind of quitting .. If you're not able to get through the Dip in an exceptional way, you must quit. Right now! It's easy to be seduced by the new money and the rush to the fresh. -leads to addiction and a very short attention span. How to get through it? Relentlessly changing tactics but never quitting the big idea. -Market wants to see u persist. It demands a signal from you that you're serious, powerful, accepted, safe. The opposite of Quitting.. is an invigorated new strategy designed to break the problem apart. Short term pain has more impact on most people than Long term benefits do. Which is why it's so important that you AMPLIFY the long term benefits of not quitting. Strategic Quitting: -Look for a new job, when you don't need one! - Never quite Something with great long term potential just because you can't deal with the stress of the moment. - Pride can be you enemy when u need to quit. Forget the cliche "never give up". Sometimes giving up is exactly what you need in order to get back up.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gene Babon

    I'm a fan of simple and this book is simple. The message is clear: Being the Best in the World is Seriously Underrated The Dip refers to "the long slog between starting and mastery." Extraordinary benefits accrue to the tiny minority who are able to get through The Dip by persisting longer than most. To be the best at anything you have to quit. You have to quit the right stuff at the right time. Quit the Cul-de-Sacs of life -- those dead ends are aren't likely to take you anywhere. Once you quit Cu I'm a fan of simple and this book is simple. The message is clear: Being the Best in the World is Seriously Underrated The Dip refers to "the long slog between starting and mastery." Extraordinary benefits accrue to the tiny minority who are able to get through The Dip by persisting longer than most. To be the best at anything you have to quit. You have to quit the right stuff at the right time. Quit the Cul-de-Sacs of life -- those dead ends are aren't likely to take you anywhere. Once you quit Cul-de-Sacs (dead-end projects, hobbies, jobs, etc.) you can refocus your resources on getting through The Dip and mastering those few things in life that matter to you most. How do you know which projects to quit? You should quit if the project (hobby, job, etc.) has a dip that isn't worth the reward at the end. Never quit anything with great long-term potential just because you can't deal with the stress of the moment. Final thought: "A woodpecker can tap twenty times on a thousand trees and get nowhere, but stay busy. Or he can tap twenty-thousand times on one tree and get dinner." I chose dinner over staying busy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Fotooh Jarkas

    I loved it! It's about how not to talk yourself into quitting your (work ,relationship, project, ..etc) just cuz it hurts or cuz you can't deal with the stress of the moment and taking the Quit as an intelligent strategic decision to give up the called dead-end situations, something with poor long-term potentials. The main point was awesome, but 85 pages were just too much ! I loved it! It's about how not to talk yourself into quitting your (work ,relationship, project, ..etc) just cuz it hurts or cuz you can't deal with the stress of the moment and taking the Quit as an intelligent strategic decision to give up the called dead-end situations, something with poor long-term potentials. The main point was awesome, but 85 pages were just too much !

  9. 4 out of 5

    Foad Ansari

    I get two important lesson from this small but amazing book. firstly: we should have exit plan for our business for example determine the exit time during my job and answer to this questions: in which situation i have to leave my job? secondly: if you can not be great and famous or popular in wide market try to find a Niche Market and be the first one in small market. after all : highly recommended

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chris Burd

    I have a great deal of respect for Mr. Godin and was looking forward to reading this book. I found quickly, however, I fundamentally disagree with much of his reasoning. I think that knowing when to quit - and not to sink time and money into something that isn't profitable - is an important lesson, and I was hoping to learn his thoughts on how to identify the right time to quit. Instead, his advice is to quit if you don't think that you can be the very best - because anything less is not worthwh I have a great deal of respect for Mr. Godin and was looking forward to reading this book. I found quickly, however, I fundamentally disagree with much of his reasoning. I think that knowing when to quit - and not to sink time and money into something that isn't profitable - is an important lesson, and I was hoping to learn his thoughts on how to identify the right time to quit. Instead, his advice is to quit if you don't think that you can be the very best - because anything less is not worthwhile. I could, perhaps, even consider an economic rationale for that advice in business. (It would be an interesting argument to explore - although even then I'm not sure I can agree.) However, Mr. Godin takes it to a much simpler and, in my opinion, less palatable conclusion. If you can't be the best (or you aren't willing to put the energy into being the best) don't do it. He uses examples of personal hobbies, such as snow boarding, crafting or golf. The idea that there are reasons that someone might do something for reasons other than being the best is outside of his realm of understanding. The idea that someone might simply enjoy doing something - even if they aren't very good at it and don't intend to train obsessively - is not even a consideration. My biggest complaint about this book, though, is that it is a BOOK at all. While this is a short book, it could have gotten the same point across in a medium-length blog post. The book itself is extremely vague and repetitive - perhaps giving you a new perspective but not providing concrete steps to take. I was also often puzzled by the examples he chose to utilize, as they did not seem to always illustrate the point he was making. I felt like he was stretching a bit for relatable examples. Not Mr. Godin's best work.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book was a disappointing read with only two points - either stick with it if you think you'll be successful or quit and do something else that you will be successful at. This book was a disappointing read with only two points - either stick with it if you think you'll be successful or quit and do something else that you will be successful at.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Beth Melillo

    The quickest lil pamphlet ever. Don't agree with the stark division between figurative winners and losers. Don't agree that going on a "quest" to be the best will always result in being the best (even if you follow all the rest of his advice). Don't agree with the fact that grit and trying hard will change everything (although he doesn't quite go that far... only implies it.) Certainly don't agree that there's only one way to see "the best." Don't agree that being the best means that you must be The quickest lil pamphlet ever. Don't agree with the stark division between figurative winners and losers. Don't agree that going on a "quest" to be the best will always result in being the best (even if you follow all the rest of his advice). Don't agree with the fact that grit and trying hard will change everything (although he doesn't quite go that far... only implies it.) Certainly don't agree that there's only one way to see "the best." Don't agree that being the best means that you must be the best in the world, or even be nationally visible. Don't agree that any one person hold's the definitive answer to what the best is - *even* if statistics can be found to support their opinions. Certainly don't agree that there aren't structures in place that keep people from being the best, despite all their efforts. All that said. I will keep in mind that when things stop challenging me I should quit, when there is not a future in sight on the path I am on I will quit, and that sometimes there are good reasons to plan to quit, and simply good reasons to quit. Think it could have been said just as well in a 1200 word blog post though.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Yousif Al Zeera

    A short book (80 pages) that addresses a crucial question: when to quit? Quitting may seem a "shame" thing to do but not always. In fact, quitting is often a very strategic choice. Although the book is just 80 pages, it should be less I believe as the central core idea was repeated several times but, nonetheless, the book is still short so you won't get frustrated. Overall, a good light read. Required time: 2-3 hours. A short book (80 pages) that addresses a crucial question: when to quit? Quitting may seem a "shame" thing to do but not always. In fact, quitting is often a very strategic choice. Although the book is just 80 pages, it should be less I believe as the central core idea was repeated several times but, nonetheless, the book is still short so you won't get frustrated. Overall, a good light read. Required time: 2-3 hours.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    Godin gives motivational and practical advice about the benefits of strategic quitting. He says that “we fail when we get distracted by tasks we don’t have the guts to quit.” He tells how to choose the right tasks to begin, then how to push through obstacles (the Dip) to reach success. This was just the book for me since I’m about a month away from going full-time with my own web design business, OptimWise. The book is short and concise; you can read it in a day. Godin summarizes the book succinc Godin gives motivational and practical advice about the benefits of strategic quitting. He says that “we fail when we get distracted by tasks we don’t have the guts to quit.” He tells how to choose the right tasks to begin, then how to push through obstacles (the Dip) to reach success. This was just the book for me since I’m about a month away from going full-time with my own web design business, OptimWise. The book is short and concise; you can read it in a day. Godin summarizes the book succinctly: “Quit the wrong stuff. Stick with the right stuff. Have the guts to do one or the other.” I read this book because it was recommended by TechNibble. • “Strategic quitting is the secret of successful organizations.” Strategic quitting isn’t the same as failing. • “Almost everything in life worth doing is controlled by the Dip...The Dip is the long slog between starting and mastery.” • Quit dead ends and refocus your time, energy, and resources. • Success goes to those who focus and obsess, not those who diversify. Be a woodpecker pecking a single tree, not the whole forest. • “If you can’t make it through the Dip, don’t start.” • “Quit or be exceptional. Average is for losers.” • Before starting, write down under what circumstances you’re willing to quit, and follow them.

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

    I could be Seth Godin if I wanted to be. Check it out: "When you're sitting in a meeting, don't be a wallflower; be the wall paint." .. or let's see .. "Don't assume that you'll be excellent, be the assumption and excellence will find you." Here's another: "If all you strive for is greatness, then all you'll be great at is striving!" There was a time when I liked this guy, but now I just think he's a shit-knuckle. I could be Seth Godin if I wanted to be. Check it out: "When you're sitting in a meeting, don't be a wallflower; be the wall paint." .. or let's see .. "Don't assume that you'll be excellent, be the assumption and excellence will find you." Here's another: "If all you strive for is greatness, then all you'll be great at is striving!" There was a time when I liked this guy, but now I just think he's a shit-knuckle.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura Noggle

    “Quit or be exceptional. Average is for losers.” My 10th Seth Godin book. He is fantastic at short little books that pack a powerful punch. I can see myself revisiting this one, especially as it is so brief. Knowing when to quit is an important skill. Hang in there when the payoff is great, but even winners throw in the towel from time to time. “Persistent people are able to visualize the idea of light at the end of the tunnel when others can't see it.” “Quit or be exceptional. Average is for losers.” My 10th Seth Godin book. He is fantastic at short little books that pack a powerful punch. I can see myself revisiting this one, especially as it is so brief. Knowing when to quit is an important skill. Hang in there when the payoff is great, but even winners throw in the towel from time to time. “Persistent people are able to visualize the idea of light at the end of the tunnel when others can't see it.”

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael Wilson

    Seth Godin is a marketing demi-god. And he knows a thing or two about everything else as well. He is one of those rare individuals who deserves the title of visionary. His blog at http://sethgodin.typepad.com/ is a must read if you are in the workplace as an owner, manager or cubicle grunt. And he knows what’s best for this ADD brain of mine. Keep it short (a mere 96 small pages with big print) and keep it focused. The core idea the entire book centers around one dilemma that each of us has faced Seth Godin is a marketing demi-god. And he knows a thing or two about everything else as well. He is one of those rare individuals who deserves the title of visionary. His blog at http://sethgodin.typepad.com/ is a must read if you are in the workplace as an owner, manager or cubicle grunt. And he knows what’s best for this ADD brain of mine. Keep it short (a mere 96 small pages with big print) and keep it focused. The core idea the entire book centers around one dilemma that each of us has faced in our lives at one time or another: Do you quit? Or do you gut it out, hoping that things get better? And how do you know when to make this decision. This book focuses on one key principle: the dip AKA that “long slog between starting and mastery.” You know what this is… the difference between the guy who is the resident golf pro at a country club and a member of the PGA tour, or the writer who has finished a manuscript and has gotten it rejected, but with a personal note to try again, and the agented, published writer. The dip creates scarcity. That is that it weeds out the people who aren’t that serious about what they want, and creates the demand for the skills and products for those that make it through the dip to the other side. Godin insists that you need to be able to determine what is a dip and what is a dead-end, and to make sure that you don’t waste energy on the dead-ends. Sticking with something because “winners never quit” is a stupid strategy, because it is inherently untrue. We all are quitters in some way. Godin has some interesting ideas (as always) but I’m not sure I’m in 100% agreement with him here. I understand the need to strive for excellence. But, if I can’t be number 1 or 2 in a market, it is time to get out?!? Not sure about that one. If I play Football Tycoon on Facebook, should my goal be for the Poo-Flinging Sock Monkeys to get trophies for being #1 or #2 in several categories? What if you take a job (or are in a dead-end job) that simply meets the needs of your family for now, even if it is not going to inspire you or catapult you to the top of the organization? I think there is some value in “settling” in the short term and acknowledging that there are different definitions of success. It is a good book that makes you think about how you spend your energy and how to decide when to cut your losses and run.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    I thought this book was going to be about buying the dip at the stock market lol but it’s actually about recovering after failures and picking yourself up and keep persisting through it when it makes sense. Short and to the point. Here’s some nice take aways: - Strive to be the best in your field or your industry or your work place etc - “...it’s typical for #1 to get ten times the benefit of #10, and a hundred times the benefit of #100 - Zipf’s law “Winners win big because the marketplace loves I thought this book was going to be about buying the dip at the stock market lol but it’s actually about recovering after failures and picking yourself up and keep persisting through it when it makes sense. Short and to the point. Here’s some nice take aways: - Strive to be the best in your field or your industry or your work place etc - “...it’s typical for #1 to get ten times the benefit of #10, and a hundred times the benefit of #100 - Zipf’s law “Winners win big because the marketplace loves a winner.” - “The Dip is the long stretch between beginners luck and real accomplishment .” - “It’s easy to be a CEO. What’s hard is getting there.” - “It’s human nature to quit when it hurts. But it’s that reflex that creates scarcity.”

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zheen

    This is a little book. Straightforward sentences without going into too much detail. It's a short, good read and I would recommend it to anyone to get a sense of what to pursue and what to let go. I only wish it was backed by studies as other books of this sort usually are. I may be wrong but I feel like Godin didn't put his best effort into it. This is a little book. Straightforward sentences without going into too much detail. It's a short, good read and I would recommend it to anyone to get a sense of what to pursue and what to let go. I only wish it was backed by studies as other books of this sort usually are. I may be wrong but I feel like Godin didn't put his best effort into it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hristian Trendafilov

    Overall good despite being repetitive. Could have used a bit more examples or different structure and it kind of repeata "focus on what's important" and "persist" in order to "reap rewards". Or maybe that's just a result of listening rather reading the book. Nonetheless I enjoyed it and find it useful. It's already helped me. Disorganised notes: Be the best in your "world" in your market. No more mass market. But there are micro markets in which you can become the best. Being the best means you a Overall good despite being repetitive. Could have used a bit more examples or different structure and it kind of repeata "focus on what's important" and "persist" in order to "reap rewards". Or maybe that's just a result of listening rather reading the book. Nonetheless I enjoyed it and find it useful. It's already helped me. Disorganised notes: Be the best in your "world" in your market. No more mass market. But there are micro markets in which you can become the best. Being the best means you are the point of reference for the consumers, yes, but moreover you are in times more valuable than the rest. Ie 80/20 law. The dip is the screen, the toughness and adversity before the reward. After you pass the dip - you'd be the best in your "world". Giving it a shot and doing your best when you are in the dip is A WASTE OF RESOURCES! Giving it a go and quitting midway or not becoming the best is a waste of resources. Resources that can be invested in another project where you can be the best! If you quit it was all for nothing. If you are in a dip - persist and claim the reward If you are in a cul de sac - quit and focus on something different You can quit the dip because you dont have time, resources, desire, you chose the wrong field. All things you can proactively anticipate. To become the best in your world - you need to find the right area, when start going through dip - persist. Only those who persist can develop and claim the reward. Hence they are valuable - the hardship has created scarcity and those who have made it are more valuable. Can quit before you are in the dip or see the dip through. Worst is to quit in the dip. Quiting the things you are mediocre at is a great strategy. Frees up energy and resources to go through the things you care about! And go through their dips. Best is to know smth is not for you and not enter its dip at all because you will not only not achieve the reward but also lose resources if you go into the wrong dip. Because if you make it through the wrong dip you wont be the best in your world, you will be average. Either quit or become exceptional But it is ok not to start or quit, dedpite the main lesson being that we must persevere through adversity. We must persevere through the right dip. When in the dip you cant be passive or simply quit. Just put more proactive effort. The dip may become worse or better. Sacrifice short term pain for long term gain. Picture yourself st graduation, picture yourself being successful in that job. Persistant people can picture the good when it's hard and equally dont picture the good when there is no good at the end. Short term vs long term. In fact the cul de sac is the same. If you dont quit - you are worse off long term. If you quit it may be short term loss but long term benefit. Is the pain through the dip worth at the end of it? Always evolve. If hit a plateu seek new challenge. The time to switch jobs is when you dont need one, when you are still uncomfotable. If in dead end compared to what you could be investing in - quitting is not just a reasonable choice- it is a smart one. If the best you can do is cope- you are better off quitting. Quit smart so that you dont waste the time you have for yourself. Dont quit smth with long term potential just because of the stress of the moment. Pride can be an obstacle to quitting, but dont let be it. Even if your ego is shredded it will heal pretty quickly after you've quit a dead end. Martiall all of your resources to get through the biggest dip that matters and quit everything else.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Clem (the villain's quest)

    3.5/5 stars Instagram | youtube discussed on my wrap up Interesting. 3.5/5 stars Instagram | youtube discussed on my wrap up Interesting.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Clausen

    I found this book in the bookstore yesterday, and read the entire thing nearly in one sitting. For a long time before I read this book, I was a fan of Seth Godin's blog and his book Permission Marketing. The basis of the book is that on the path to great success there will always be a "dip," a rough patch that seperates those who really want to accomplish greatness from those who do not. The key question you have to ask yourself is whether you are ready to be either number 1 or number 2 in your f I found this book in the bookstore yesterday, and read the entire thing nearly in one sitting. For a long time before I read this book, I was a fan of Seth Godin's blog and his book Permission Marketing. The basis of the book is that on the path to great success there will always be a "dip," a rough patch that seperates those who really want to accomplish greatness from those who do not. The key question you have to ask yourself is whether you are ready to be either number 1 or number 2 in your field--if you are not, then you should be prepared to quit to focus on the field where you will be number 1 or number 2. Perhaps the book's most controversial conclusions is that you should "quit" often things that you cannot be great at in order to focus on the one or two things that you are going to be excellent at. I have to admit, I found this tough to read because my instincts have always been to diversify. I've always wanted to dabble in a bunch of things. My creative instincts have always taken me to different places to dabble, and I feel like a fuller more complete person for having explored these diverse interests. I have to say though, that after reading this book my mind has been made up that I truly do need to concentrate on the things that I will be eventually awesome at--unless I want to be number 1 or number 2 at being the truly complete (post-modern) person. I have found that Godin's writing can be either hit or miss. This one is a definate hit in my opinion.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Orth

    Source Energy grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference. Whenever we start something new there is a period of time when our initial inspiration, aspiration, and intention runs out of stream. We have a choice to make at that point. Do we call it good and just settle into the low energy, malaise of the current situation? Do we go against the grain and continue climbing and become a super star among the few who ' Source Energy grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference. Whenever we start something new there is a period of time when our initial inspiration, aspiration, and intention runs out of stream. We have a choice to make at that point. Do we call it good and just settle into the low energy, malaise of the current situation? Do we go against the grain and continue climbing and become a super star among the few who 'make it'? Do we quit? Sometimes, quitting is the best option. This book helps the reader determine what is going on an encourages the reader to go the middle path - not settling for good enough nor beating our heads against brick walls. Find that which we can really get passionate about, so much so we are willing to deal with the steep climb and become and become the best of the best - and quit the rest! I love how he says "winners never quit and quitters never quit" is rubbish. It makes sense to make an informed decision when we are in the dip if we want to stay with the task or quit. The choice is ours. It is most constructive to follow our passion and really climb the wall to our best self and quit the rest.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gisela Hausmann

    It’s an old question, “Should you follow Edison’s credo and try one more time or give up?” Author Seth Godin offers a new approach; he calls on dealing with “the dip”. “…The dip is the long slog between starting and mastery. A long slog that’s actually a shortcut, because it gets you where you want to go faster than any other path…” In his book the author offers methods to evaluate “the dip”, which are ways to decide whether the dip offers insight that it is time to quit or carry on. The good new It’s an old question, “Should you follow Edison’s credo and try one more time or give up?” Author Seth Godin offers a new approach; he calls on dealing with “the dip”. “…The dip is the long slog between starting and mastery. A long slog that’s actually a shortcut, because it gets you where you want to go faster than any other path…” In his book the author offers methods to evaluate “the dip”, which are ways to decide whether the dip offers insight that it is time to quit or carry on. The good news is that Godin sees value in going through the exercise. Knowing that a project is bound to fail is a jumping board for new projects, for which it will sense to make it through the dip. Highly recommend, Gisela Hausmann, author & blogger

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mohammad Saadeh

    "If it’s not going to put a dent in the world, quit. Right now. Quit and use that void to find the energy to assault the Dip that matters." This book is for everyone who wants to be number one in the world in his field, for everyone who wants to succeed, for everyone who is ready to cope the pain. This book really teaches you when to quit and when to stick. This book is worth 5 stars if it was not concentrating only on the sales field, I hoped that the author concentrated also on the other fields. B "If it’s not going to put a dent in the world, quit. Right now. Quit and use that void to find the energy to assault the Dip that matters." This book is for everyone who wants to be number one in the world in his field, for everyone who wants to succeed, for everyone who is ready to cope the pain. This book really teaches you when to quit and when to stick. This book is worth 5 stars if it was not concentrating only on the sales field, I hoped that the author concentrated also on the other fields. But nevertheless, you know directly what the author wants to tell you and teach you. Thank you Seth Godin!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eat.Sleep.Lift.Read.

    The message be muddled. A book not for the weak of heart. Quit. Quit, and do it now. The book claims if you're not going to be the best in the world at your particular chosen endeavor - quit. Brutal advice, that needs to be taken with a bucket of salt, but not completely ignored. As someone more profound than I once pontificated "insanity is doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results" There's much clutter in our lives and a cull of pointless endeavors could be the medic The message be muddled. A book not for the weak of heart. Quit. Quit, and do it now. The book claims if you're not going to be the best in the world at your particular chosen endeavor - quit. Brutal advice, that needs to be taken with a bucket of salt, but not completely ignored. As someone more profound than I once pontificated "insanity is doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results" There's much clutter in our lives and a cull of pointless endeavors could be the medicine required. Go forth and quit. But quit wisely. .

  27. 4 out of 5

    Fahad Naeem

    If you want to put your time in reading Self-Help then do read it on the recommendation of your friends. I started reading it because it has fewer pages and would have helped me in my 2020 challenge but I've related this book with myself. This book could be further reduced in terms of number of pages but do give it a quick glance and you might now why you're getting bored while trying to achieve something, develop a skill or make a difference and it could change your life by changing the way you If you want to put your time in reading Self-Help then do read it on the recommendation of your friends. I started reading it because it has fewer pages and would have helped me in my 2020 challenge but I've related this book with myself. This book could be further reduced in terms of number of pages but do give it a quick glance and you might now why you're getting bored while trying to achieve something, develop a skill or make a difference and it could change your life by changing the way you think.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anton

    Very powerful. Read it today This is a deceptively short book with the equally deceptively simple premise... But the wisdom of the advice it offers is incredibly insightful. You can read it in one sitting but it will leave you with a train-load of things to think about once you are done. Definitely strongly recommended

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rita Vo

    "People settle. They settle for less than they are capable of. They settle for good enough instead of best in the world." Spending a few hours for this short awesome read could be one of the best thing you could ever do for yourself. "People settle. They settle for less than they are capable of. They settle for good enough instead of best in the world." Spending a few hours for this short awesome read could be one of the best thing you could ever do for yourself.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ron Jones

    This book was really not helpful. Very repetitive, it could have been a magazine article.... and a short one. The sub title says: A Little book that teaches you when to quit (and when to stick)..... it did neither.

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