counter create hit Their Finest Hour - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Their Finest Hour

Availability: Ready to download

Winston Churchill's six-volume history of the cataclysm that swept the world remains the definitive history of the Second World War. Lucid, dramatic, remarkable both for its breadth and sweep and for its sense of personal involvement, it is universally acknowledged as a magnificent reconstruction and is an enduring, compelling work that led to his being awarded the Nobel P Winston Churchill's six-volume history of the cataclysm that swept the world remains the definitive history of the Second World War. Lucid, dramatic, remarkable both for its breadth and sweep and for its sense of personal involvement, it is universally acknowledged as a magnificent reconstruction and is an enduring, compelling work that led to his being awarded the Nobel Prize for literature. Their Finest Hour enthrallingly recounts key events and battles from May to December 1940 as Britain stood isolated while Nazi Germany pursued its seemingly unconquerable war path - the fall of France, Dunkirk and the Battle of Britain, the horrors of the Blitz and Hitler's plans to invade and crush Russia, his sole ally in Europe.


Compare
Ads Banner

Winston Churchill's six-volume history of the cataclysm that swept the world remains the definitive history of the Second World War. Lucid, dramatic, remarkable both for its breadth and sweep and for its sense of personal involvement, it is universally acknowledged as a magnificent reconstruction and is an enduring, compelling work that led to his being awarded the Nobel P Winston Churchill's six-volume history of the cataclysm that swept the world remains the definitive history of the Second World War. Lucid, dramatic, remarkable both for its breadth and sweep and for its sense of personal involvement, it is universally acknowledged as a magnificent reconstruction and is an enduring, compelling work that led to his being awarded the Nobel Prize for literature. Their Finest Hour enthrallingly recounts key events and battles from May to December 1940 as Britain stood isolated while Nazi Germany pursued its seemingly unconquerable war path - the fall of France, Dunkirk and the Battle of Britain, the horrors of the Blitz and Hitler's plans to invade and crush Russia, his sole ally in Europe.

30 review for Their Finest Hour

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    The bit from the second volume that everyone quotes is "We will fight them on the beaches". Well, I love that too, but my very favourite phrase is a less well-known one: "Tanks for Africa!" I know, it doesn't sound particularly inspiring. But it is, when you know the background, and I've said it to myself many times when things have looked bad. Let me fill you in on the story. Due to Britain's criminally inept preparation (see the first volume), World War II has gotten off to a catastrophic start The bit from the second volume that everyone quotes is "We will fight them on the beaches". Well, I love that too, but my very favourite phrase is a less well-known one: "Tanks for Africa!" I know, it doesn't sound particularly inspiring. But it is, when you know the background, and I've said it to myself many times when things have looked bad. Let me fill you in on the story. Due to Britain's criminally inept preparation (see the first volume), World War II has gotten off to a catastrophic start. The rest of Europe has fallen to the Nazis, who are still uneasily allied with the Soviet Union. The United States dithers on the sidelines, while FDR tries to convince people that this is also their fight. Meanwhile, Hitler's next move will be to try and invade Britain. He starts with a crushing air offensive. Under these circumstances, the obvious thing to do would have been to put all our resources into defence. After all, the Germans were so close to breaking through! But Churchill made a far-seeing strategic decision. Defence wasn't enough: if we managed to survive this bit, it was essential to be able to counter-attack later on. He gave orders to send tanks to Egypt, where there was a chance of halting the Axis advance in the North African desert. I thought his judgement here was little short of miraculous. It worked out exactly as he had hoped: the brave fighter pilots of the RAF managed to win the Battle of Britain, and the German invasion was cancelled. The Allied foothold in Egypt also held, and it was possible to consolidate it before the Axis could pour in more troops and armour. Eventually, this allowed the Allies to march as far as Tunisia, and then invade Southern Europe through Sicily and Italy. So, indeed, "We will fight them on the beaches" is very fine. It perfectly expresses the spirit of never surrendering, irrespective of the odds against you. But calmly assuming that we're going to get through this situation, no matter how desperate it is, and then planning for what we're going to do next - that's truly inspiring. "Tanks for Africa!"

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Weinstein

    It is an absolute delight to share the history as Churchill experienced it. The writing is clear and compelling, revealing the man as much as the times. So far, I have read through the 1940 events. Much more to follow.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mikey B.

    "We Shall Never Surrender" by Jean Cardot - at Le Petit Palais in Paris This book covers the period from May 1940 to the end of that dire year – when Britain truly stood alone – for freedom and against Nazism. Europe was under Nazi-Fascist rule – and all were antagonistic and many expected Britain to make a deal with the Nazis. Churchill took the helm – after the British Parliament had had enough of Neville Chamberlain – at the very moment when Nazi tanks were entering Holland and Belgium en route "We Shall Never Surrender" by Jean Cardot - at Le Petit Palais in Paris This book covers the period from May 1940 to the end of that dire year – when Britain truly stood alone – for freedom and against Nazism. Europe was under Nazi-Fascist rule – and all were antagonistic and many expected Britain to make a deal with the Nazis. Churchill took the helm – after the British Parliament had had enough of Neville Chamberlain – at the very moment when Nazi tanks were entering Holland and Belgium en route to France. Seldom has a leader risen to such vast and solitary heights. Churchill describes his five perilous trips to France to attempt to bolster and instill a fighting spirit. But France, beaten down politically and still suffering from the sacrifices it made during the First World War, capitulated. And it was all left to Churchill and Britain. Page 191 – from a June 17,1940 broadcast (Page 191, my book) The news from France is very bad, and I grieve for the gallant French people who have fallen into this terrible misfortune. Nothing will alter our feelings towards them or our faith that the genius of France will rise again. What has happened in France makes no difference to our actions and purpose. We have become the sole champions now in arms to defend the world cause. We shall do our best to be worthy of this high honour. We shall defend our Island home, and with the British Empire we shall fight on unconquerable until the curse of Hitler is lifted from the brows of mankind. We are sure that in the end all will come right. Once more in this volume we have Churchill’s brilliant writing to guide us through these treacherous days. His use of language, his speeches, his letters resonate onto all aspects – from munitions, to broken glass from air-raids and even pork production. One particularly heart-rending passage concerns the delayed-action bombs dropped by the German planes that required special teams to defuse them. Some would not make it. It is also at this time that Churchill starts to reach out to Roosevelt and the U.S. He knew the productive capacity of the United States. He also sent letters to Stalin, but to no avail. Churchill felt that a German invasion of the United Kingdom would have been a disaster for Nazi Germany – and therefore somewhat unlikely to take place. The Germans never had the naval forces to support an invasion. Specifically they could land troops somewhere along the English coast, but would have been unable to sustain them. Britain’s navy and the RAF would have seen to that. What Churchill feared more was the long term effects of the Battle of the Atlantic. Keeping significant portions of the British fleet to prevent invasion was taking needed protection away from convoys crossing the Atlantic that were bringing precious material and food to sustain the British Isles. Seaports on Britain’s east coast were being bombed by German planes – forcing disembarkation of valuable goods in crowded western ports. The merchant fleet was being decimated in the Atlantic crossing and Britain could be slowly starved of both valuable food and munitions – that would make it harder to thwart an invasion. Churchill was never adverse to risk and had little tolerance for inertia. Woe to those in government and the military who wanted to constantly play it safe. He was invariably initiating plans and stressed movement. Churchill gambled by sending troops and tanks to Egypt in October of 1940 when England was threatened by invasion. When the Italian Army was routed in Egypt, and then Libya, it brought wonderful news to a besieged Britain. Excerpt of letter from Churchill to Prime Minister Menzies of Australia, September 29, 1940 (page 646-47) But I can make no promises at all of victory, nor can I make any promises that regrettable and lamentable incidents will not occur, or that there will not be disappointments and blunders. On the contrary, I think the only certainly is that we have very bad times indeed to go through before we emerge from the mortal perils by which we are surrounded.

  4. 4 out of 5

    GoldGato

    This is the volume of the Second World War collection, in which Mr. Churchill really grabs the reader's attention. While the first volume had to present the background and all of the events leading up to WWII, this book focuses on the hard-pressed Brits and their resilience in the face of seeming victory for the enemy. The Prime Minister's sardonic comments are sprinkled throughout, so you can laugh even when you want to cry. He is blisteringly honest in his evaluation of the constant losing and This is the volume of the Second World War collection, in which Mr. Churchill really grabs the reader's attention. While the first volume had to present the background and all of the events leading up to WWII, this book focuses on the hard-pressed Brits and their resilience in the face of seeming victory for the enemy. The Prime Minister's sardonic comments are sprinkled throughout, so you can laugh even when you want to cry. He is blisteringly honest in his evaluation of the constant losing and how the British population is close to just giving up altogether. Then comes the Battle of Britain and the beginning of the turnaround against the Germans. He keeps the reader glued with the detail, so that you feel you were there when it happened. This is a big book, but once you get hooked, forget about putting it down. The human tragedy is mixed with human hope and that wonderful British upper-lip-ness. As London is being destroyed neighborhood by neighborhood by Hitler's flying bombs, a Home Guardsman is heard saying, "It's a grand life, if we don't weaken." Book Season = Autumn (there is always hope)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Grant

    This volume describes key events and battles from May to December 1940 when Britain stood alone against the might of the Nazis (and subsequently the Italians). Winston Churchill describes the theme of the volume as "How the British people held the fort alone till those who hitherto had been half blind were half ready" which sums it up exactly. This narrative of Churchill's involvement shows just how much he contributed to the direction that the war took including suggestions for the design of su This volume describes key events and battles from May to December 1940 when Britain stood alone against the might of the Nazis (and subsequently the Italians). Winston Churchill describes the theme of the volume as "How the British people held the fort alone till those who hitherto had been half blind were half ready" which sums it up exactly. This narrative of Churchill's involvement shows just how much he contributed to the direction that the war took including suggestions for the design of such things as aerial mines and amphibious vehicles for landing tanks, countless telegrams to President Roosevelt to ask for help, his subtle and diplomatic handling of the Vichy Government and his understanding of battle strategy and tactics. Here we have a first-hand account of the fall of France, Operation Dynamo at Dunkirk, the Blitz, the thwarted German Operation Sea Lion, the Battle of Britain and also the important role played by the British scientific community (the so-called "Wizard War"). The volume includes maps and diagrams to help understand the troop movements during the battles as well as Churchill's personal minutes and telegrams and various tables of facts and figures which soberly present the massive losses incurred. Also included are snippets from some of Churchill's famous addresses to the British and French nations which helped to rally the spirits of ordinary folk in horrendously difficult times. Similarly, despite the obviously grim subject matter, Churchill manages to inject his account with some dry humour to help lift the reader's spirits. For example, directly after a telegram to the Minister of Supply showing how concerned Churchill was about the lack of a particular kind of small arms ammunition we get this nugget: "The reader must pardon this next minute. Prime Minister to First Lord 18.IX.40 Surely you can run to a new Admiralty flag. It grieves me to see the present dingy object every morning." And about General de Gaulle of whom Churchill had the utmost respect: "He also felt it to be essential to his position before the French people that he should maintain a haughty demeanour towards 'perfidious Albion', although an exile, dependent upon our protection and dwelling in our midst. He had to be rude to the British to prove to French eyes that he was not a British puppet. He certainly carried out this policy with perseverance." This was a book that I just couldn't put down and I devoured it in a couple of days only to be left wishing that I also had all the other volumes to hand (as well as wishing that I'd started with Volume I, obviously!). Churchill thoroughly deserved his Nobel Prize for this remarkable contribution to literature.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Reading this book I realized how American centered our teaching of history is. Not that it is unexpected or wrong really, we just leave stuff out because it doesn't directly relate to the US. For example, I knew WWII started in 1939, I just didn't know much about what happened before Pearl Harbor. In a lot of things I've read, and especially watched (I'm talking History Channel here) Germany invaded Poland, then nobody did anything else for almost two years until Pearl Harbor when suddenly every Reading this book I realized how American centered our teaching of history is. Not that it is unexpected or wrong really, we just leave stuff out because it doesn't directly relate to the US. For example, I knew WWII started in 1939, I just didn't know much about what happened before Pearl Harbor. In a lot of things I've read, and especially watched (I'm talking History Channel here) Germany invaded Poland, then nobody did anything else for almost two years until Pearl Harbor when suddenly every part of the world was involved. This volume details how Germany took France and almost every other part of continental Europe and then what Britain did and how she fought on, basically alone, for more than a year, until the US entered the war. It helped explain to me what the heck was going on in Africa. I've seen all those cool shots of tanks racing around in the desert and heard about Montgomery beating Rommel (the Desert Fox) and never had any clue why they were there in the first place. Italy, and then Germany, fought back and forth in North Africa for two years before the US got involved. I knew about the Battle of Britain, but I didn't know that England got the snot bombed out of them for seven straight months. Or that they had nearly 100,000 civilian casualties because of it. Or the cool tricks they played with their radar beacons to mess up the German planes. And the fact the Yugoslavia got the tar beaten out of them because the government allied with Germany, then a popular revolution forced the pro-German government out and the new government repudiated the Germans. This made Hitler mad and he carpet-bombed Belgrade for 3 days. Iraq tried to go Pro-German, but British forces staged a coup and took over. The same thing almost happened in Iran. The naval battle for control of the Atlantic and Mediterranean was incredible. And I had only heard a few bare mentions of all of these things. This was a seriously cool book to learn about all this new stuff from a time in history I thought I understood.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Londi

    We shall never surrender✌

  8. 5 out of 5

    Johnny

    The page numbers in the following review correspond to the hardbound copy of the book rather than the paperback pictured. The second volume in Churchill's memoirs concerning his period as prime minister, like the first in the series, is not as much to be read as pondered. It is almost more of a database of charts, dates, memos, speeches, and telegrams interspersed with narrative than it is a traditional memoir. As such, it is valuable for reference, reflection, research, and careful reading. I fi The page numbers in the following review correspond to the hardbound copy of the book rather than the paperback pictured. The second volume in Churchill's memoirs concerning his period as prime minister, like the first in the series, is not as much to be read as pondered. It is almost more of a database of charts, dates, memos, speeches, and telegrams interspersed with narrative than it is a traditional memoir. As such, it is valuable for reference, reflection, research, and careful reading. I find, however, that my limit is usually 30-40 pages per "sitting" and sometimes, less than that. That disclaimer aside, if I were to rate this book on reference materials alone, it would be a 4-5 star grade. Indeed, I have often used the exhaustive indices of these books to look up particular operations or pieces of logistical information, so I know their value as a reference work. In terms of reading straight through, I would rate them 1-2 stars. Hence, my "average" rating for a very important book. Churchill was brilliant in that he was willing to learn from the past without being slavishly bound to the factions, fashion, and grudges of the past. In opposing a government purge, he stated: "If the present tries to sit in judgment of the past, it will lose the future." (p. 10) In a speech on the death of Neville Chamberlain, he spoke of the misleading nature of the "flickering light of history." (p. 550) Of course, history is still both an interesting and cautionary study. Did, for example, Churchill's advocacy of preventive internment of Communists and Fascists (p. 55) lead to Roosevelt's war crime against loyal Japanese citizens in the U.S. at a later point in the war? When Count Molotov wished Germany complete success in her "defensive measures" (the invasion of Norway), was that in any way similar to those nations who half-heartedly joined in or approved the modern "defensive measures" in the U.S.'s invasion of Iraq? Is this the diplomacy of jockeying for future position and favors when one doesn't care about the outcome? How much of our present Middle Eastern heartache might we have been spared if Churchill had not been opposed in his efforts to arm the Israelis in Tel Aviv (pre-State of Israel) to assist in their own defense (p. 422). Most interesting to me in this volume were Churchill's efforts to use surplus vehicles, vessels, and artillery/armament in what he knew was a warfare transformed by technology. Yet, he asserted that "Any cannon is better than no cannon at all." (p. 272) He insisted on training horses for duty in Ireland to free up vehicles for service elsewhere (p. 462). He lobbied arduously for old destroyers from the U.S. and argued that the gift of 50 outdated destroyers might have kept Spain out of the Axis (p. 521). He hated military siloing as illustrated (pointing out how the German military arms refused to work together on p. 303 and 309). The exciting account of redirecting German targeting beams was concluded with the observation that "...during these two months nobody had the courage to tell Goering that his beams were twisted or jammed. In his ignorance he pledged himself that this was impossible. Special lectures and warnings were delivered to the German Air Force, assuring them that the beam was infallible and that anyone who cast doubt on it would be at once thrown out." (p. 387) I found myself horrified that, at a time when French command was desperately in need of British bombing support, French peasants dragged all kinds of carts and lorries onto the airfield so that the British bombers couldn't even take off to start on their mission (p. 156). And I was amazed at racist sentiments like "good enough to fight Italians" (p. 426).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Glyn Longden

    Rating: 8/10. In the last half century, the reputation of Winston Churchill has suffered significantly. He has been accused of failing to realize the political agenda of Stalin at the end of the war and almost colluding to deliver eastern Europe to the Soviet Union. While these criticisms may or may not be true, there can be no doubting the brilliance of Churchill as a historical writer. In this, the second of his six-volume history of the war, we see Churchill as he comes to power in 1940. In r Rating: 8/10. In the last half century, the reputation of Winston Churchill has suffered significantly. He has been accused of failing to realize the political agenda of Stalin at the end of the war and almost colluding to deliver eastern Europe to the Soviet Union. While these criticisms may or may not be true, there can be no doubting the brilliance of Churchill as a historical writer. In this, the second of his six-volume history of the war, we see Churchill as he comes to power in 1940. In rapid succession, he has to deal with the collapse of France, the Dunkirk evacuation, the Battle of Britain, the Blitz, and the start of the North African campaign. Now that he is Prime Minister, Churchill can document his decisions and his feelings at the time. The overall impression the reader receives is of a man who is constantly questioning his subordinates, urging speed and efficiency on a nation which is on the brink of invasion, demanding answers, offering suggestions and solutions, and never being satisfied with negative opinion. He documents all this in great detail. The energy of the man was unbelievable; you quickly begin to understand how he was able to inspire and mobilize the nation. I am one who enjoys Churchill's clear and easy writing style. It appears old-fashioned now but the man certainly mastered the English language in a way few historians have been able to match. And the best part of all is that there are still four volumes to go.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Winston Churchill's second book in his World War II series covers the time period from May to December 1940. The early weeks of Spring, 1940 were very busy for Churchill, since he had to name all of the heads of the government agencies he presided over as the incoming Prime Minister of Great Britain. Besides structuring a coalition government to run the country, he had to become intimately involved in all of the complicated decision-making attendant on preparing his country for war. He would som Winston Churchill's second book in his World War II series covers the time period from May to December 1940. The early weeks of Spring, 1940 were very busy for Churchill, since he had to name all of the heads of the government agencies he presided over as the incoming Prime Minister of Great Britain. Besides structuring a coalition government to run the country, he had to become intimately involved in all of the complicated decision-making attendant on preparing his country for war. He would somehow find the energy needed for almost six years of war while becoming personally engaged in every aspect of British defensive and offensive operations. He held the positions of Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister of Defence, and Leader of the House of Commons simultaneously. On May 13, he asked the House of Commons for a vote of confidence in his Administration. During this session, he gave one of his most famous speeches, announcing "I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears, and sweat" (p. 24). Churchill's six volumes of this series are must-reads for anyone who wants the full story of how the war was fought. The reason is because he was the only world leader during the war who produced an in-depth, intimate account of his activities during the war. He doesn't miss a single days' worth of the British government's involvement on a number of fronts. His clear narrative writing is supplemented by extensive reproductions of his most important correspondence. He had a great way of incorporating this material, which also helped him to organize his thoughts while fleshing out the outlines of his books. Having unlimited access to government war documents after he was out of office in the late 1940's, he used a team of advisers to collect pertinent letters, memoranda and speeches of himself and many other officials with whom he corresponded. The book publisher set the documents up in print while the advisers collated them chronologically. Churchill, meanwhile, dictated recollections of important events. Everything would be corrected; then Churchill would dictate his six volumes. The benefit to the reader of having the books laid out in this manner is that the numerous supporting documents were inserted into the flow of the narrative history, not only providing a wealth of authenticity but eliminating the need to refer to constant footnotes. Many other documents, not considered necessary by the author for understanding the books' flow of events, were reprinted as appendices. Maps are skillfully used in the early section devoted to the Battle of France, after the Germans invaded France and Belgium starting May 10. It was shocking to the British, French and other European allies to find themselves witnessing the wholesale gobbling up of Belgian, French and Dutch territory in just a few weeks. The maps clearly show how, day by depressing day, the French and British army divisions were pushed back until the only territory left to defend in northern France by the end of the month was a beachhead at Dunkirk. Several hundred thousand British personnel, and some French units, were able to be evacuated under fire from the Germans, leaving all of their irreplaceable artillery and equipment behind. The reason was extremely poor French military planning and hesitant, confused battlefield leadership, combined with the relentless German advance, or "Blitskrieg". Many French leaders were predicting France's doom even while sizable French units were able to carry on the war in the south and the government was still operating in Paris. Churchill's detailed account of the French government's weakness, witnessed at first hand during several flights Churchill made to confer with his allies, is a testimony to all of the criticism the French received for the manner of their eventual surrender. When it was clear that the Germans were going to overrun the remainder of the country, the Prime Minister, Paul Reynaud, was trying to move the government to France's possessions in North Africa, where the French flag would still fly and the hope of winning back their country could be kept alive; other countries now dominated by the Nazis had kept their national causes alive from overseas. However, defeatism was rampant in the French government. The nay-sayers, led by Marshall Petain, convinced themselves that Britain would soon be conquered after their country. One official summed up their attitude: "Better be a Nazi province. At least we know what means" (p. 187). Thus began a state of affairs with the great ally, France, lost, not to total defeat, but to capitulation. A French government operated at Vichy under the heel of their German "guests." The British government had to be very careful on the diplomatic front. They didn't want to provoke Vichy into declaring war and joining their German puppet-masters as allies. This would require the British to treat their recent allies as enemies, making the possible eventual liberation of France very problematical. There would be situations that could not be avoided, based on the leading French admiral's decision to prevent his fleet from sailing to Britain or America before the German occupation was complete. On one occasion, the British navy had to fire on French vessels to keep them from falling into German hands, at the port of Toulon. The most interesting figure in this situation was General Charles DeGaulle, who was evacuated to Britain along with several "Free French" army divisions. He became the leading Frenchman outside his country calling for liberation from the Germans. He had fought his government's earlier decision to capitulate. For this, he was sentenced to death in absentia by Vichy. The British did all they could to enhance his reputation and assist him in landing his forces in North Africa to carry on the fight under the French flag. All of the above developments were only the beginning of Great Britain's challenges for the rest of 1940. Their army was saved, but they had hardly any arms, at a time when the possibility of a German invasion across the Channel was thought imminent. Indeed, Hitler had pushed his commanders to get started with "Operation Sea Lion". Internal military squabbling was the main reason the Germans couldn't enact this plan during 1940, giving the British precious time to rearm and rebuild. In preparation for a cross-channel invasion, the Germans unleashed air attacks on Britain during the summer and fall of 1940 which caused great destruction and loss of life, the "Blitz." Churchill is considered to be one of the great authorities of this series of attacks which terrorized and killed the citizenry while challenging the country's air defenses, especially the RAF, to the point of exhaustion. Even if the German cross-channel didn't happen, the British were facing almost insurmountable obstacles caused by the lack of arms supplies and manufacturing capacity to provide all that was needed for defensive and offensive operations. The one great hope was the United States, whose Congress was dominated by isolationist thinking. Churchill early-on courted President Franklin Roosevelt in the hope of finding any kind of way to send American arms to Britain. Hundreds of thousands of small arms were shipped across the Atlantic within the first months after Dunkirk. Of far greater importance was a fleet of fifty obsolete, but serviceable American destroyers, which were needed to combat the growing German submarine threat to Britain's sea approaches. Churchill and Roosevelt cleverly and tirelessly worked to hammer out an agreement whereby the American government would relinquish the ships while the British government would grant long-term leases in British territory, ranging from Newfoundland to the Caribbean and British Guiana, for American naval bases. By late 1940, the British were running out of money to pay for all of the American military material they needed; the solution offered by Roosevelt was to find a way to let the British obtain the arms they needed from America the way that a homeowner whose house was on fire would borrow a water hose from his neighbor, with no discussion of monetary payment in a critical time of need. Thus, "Lend-Lease" became a device which helped the British Isles survive during a time of great uncertainty. Lend-lease would become one of the greatest mutual assistance programs between countries, ever. Roosevelt cleverly brought the American Congress, and public along, at a time when public opinion was softening to the plight of the British who were being bombed daily. Churchill's prediction that Germany would not react to this assistance with a declaration of war against the United States was correct. Churchill's reasoning was that Hitler preferred to knock off his victims one by one. Nevertheless, America progressed from neutral country to non-belligerent during there early World War II days. The constant ship convoys across the Atlantic could not be ignored, however, and 1941, up to Pearl Harbor in December, saw a state of increasingly deadly undeclared war exist, whereby the American Navy was sailing into hostile territory, trying to escort U.S. merchant shipping which was not always accorded neutral status by German submarines. Regardless of American losses of life, Great Britain was in the position during the greater part of 1940-41 of fighting its deadly enemies with its recent allies defeated, and its World War I ally, America, standing on the sidelines. This predicament is the basis for the Theme of this book: "How the British people held the fort alone till those who hitherto had been half blind were half ready." There were many other actions and developments occurring on the political, diplomatic and military fronts as chronicled by the great man in his second volume. The final chapters deal with one of the most alarming: the entry of Italy into the war on the side of Germany. Mussolini created almost as much trouble for his ally, Hitler as he did to his enemies, especially regarding his ill-fated decision to invade Greece. His military's biggest disaster, however, was inflicted on his sizable army in North Africa. The British, alarmed at the thought of an imminent invasion by Italian forces eastward to Egypt in late 1940, decided to take a gamble and unleash an invasion on the Italians. In six weeks, during December-January, the British advanced over 200 miles of desert westward to Tobruk, rolling up strongly-fortified Italian positions. The great Italian army in Africa practically vaporized, with 113,000 of their soldiers captured. The Germans would have to jump in and try to gain back the Italians' lost territory, but that issue would be the subject of a later book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ross

    This series of volumes detailing WW II is strictly for those who love Churchill and love great detail. This 2nd volume in the series covers the period from the start of the war through Churchill's appointment as prime minister in May 1940 to the end of 1940. Much of the book is reprints of Churchill's directives to his ministers on giving directions and asking for answers on progress. As I say, this is very detailed material. The book is about half history and half autobiography.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Owen

    I bought Churchill's 6-volume history of the Second World War many years ago, but did not find the strength to begin reading it until some time later. The effect was immediate. Although it took me over a year to read all of it, that was only because I have long had the habit of reading a number of books concurrently. I simply couldn't put Churchill down. To say that the story of World War II is a gripping one, is to put it mildly. How much more gripping do you think it might be in the hands of t I bought Churchill's 6-volume history of the Second World War many years ago, but did not find the strength to begin reading it until some time later. The effect was immediate. Although it took me over a year to read all of it, that was only because I have long had the habit of reading a number of books concurrently. I simply couldn't put Churchill down. To say that the story of World War II is a gripping one, is to put it mildly. How much more gripping do you think it might be in the hands of that one unique individual who was both one of the central players and the recorder of the events themselves. At times, I found myself actually wanting certain historical events to go in favour of the Allies although, naturally, I already knew the outcome! Such is the effect of Churchill's writing. In the second volume "Their Finest Hour," Britain was holding the fort against Hitler alone. After Dunkirk, spirits were low all over the place and the value of Dr Goebells's secret weapon was able to come into play with great effect. One can imagine the feeling of the citizenry of Britain at that time, trapped as they felt themselves to be in that little island, with an unbeaten army just across the channel snarling at them. The whys and wherefores of the actions of both Hitler and the German General Staff at that time, can be discussed until you are blue in the face. The fact is that, although most people on both sides of the Atlantic thought they were about to hop across and finish the job, the Germans hesitated, mainly for lack of a plan, and lost the chance. I don't know for sure if Churchill also thought the British might have been defeated in July, August or September of 1940, but from the end of that odd period of stalemate, he never looked back. This is fine writing by a, dare I say, highly experienced writer who was right in the thick of things almost from the word go. What a stroke of luck it was that Churchill, like Caesar but unlike Napoleon, both lived it and wrote it. Comment

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This second volume of Churchill's history of the Second World War is written in his wonderful style, and quite detailed. Unfortunately the maps in the ebook are, as often happens, too small to see well. Churchill does a good job of describing what they knew at the time and what they found out later from captured Nazi records. Much of the book seems to consist of long quotations of his own memoranda to others at the time, showing that he suggested successful strategies, argued against unsuccessfu This second volume of Churchill's history of the Second World War is written in his wonderful style, and quite detailed. Unfortunately the maps in the ebook are, as often happens, too small to see well. Churchill does a good job of describing what they knew at the time and what they found out later from captured Nazi records. Much of the book seems to consist of long quotations of his own memoranda to others at the time, showing that he suggested successful strategies, argued against unsuccessful ones, and generally was in charge. But whose insights are better? His need to justify his actions at the time seems totally unnecessary to the admiring twenty-first century reader, but one must remember that he was writing after giving his professional life to the government of Britain and steering his country well and wisely through the incredibly difficult and dangerous years of the war, and then being kicked out of the government when victory had been achieved. One of those books that every student of World War II should probably read--although he has been a source in many others. The right man for the time, indeed.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Streator Johnson

    Volume two of Churchill's history of WWII. What an extraordinary work. We are lucky to have such a mammoth document from one so close to all that happened during this period. Now I haven't read many of these types of works (U. S. Grant's autobiography is on my list), but I am fascinated by these books (only four more to go). And I know one has to take what is said with a little salt, but like I said, it is still fascinating. This one covers from about May of 1940 to January 1941. And that is 630 Volume two of Churchill's history of WWII. What an extraordinary work. We are lucky to have such a mammoth document from one so close to all that happened during this period. Now I haven't read many of these types of works (U. S. Grant's autobiography is on my list), but I am fascinated by these books (only four more to go). And I know one has to take what is said with a little salt, but like I said, it is still fascinating. This one covers from about May of 1940 to January 1941. And that is 630 pages, to give you an idea of the detail he goes into. And since it covers the period of the Battle of Britain, it is quite exciting even when you know what's going to happen. I strongly recommend this series for anyone who has a history bent.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Raborg

    The first volume was better than the second. Churchill bogs down the reader with tons of official communications in this volume. But, he does a fantastic job of showing the heroism of the British people in their most difficult moment. The student of politics will likely appreciate all the nuances of diplomacy and politics described by Churchill. At any rate, Churchill writes with beautiful and clear prose and I look forward to the third volume, which will describe the Battle of the Atlantic and The first volume was better than the second. Churchill bogs down the reader with tons of official communications in this volume. But, he does a fantastic job of showing the heroism of the British people in their most difficult moment. The student of politics will likely appreciate all the nuances of diplomacy and politics described by Churchill. At any rate, Churchill writes with beautiful and clear prose and I look forward to the third volume, which will describe the Battle of the Atlantic and the year 1941.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John

    Churchill's first hand account of WW2. This volume covers the early war when England stood alone. France had fallen. The USA was not yet in. Nazi Germany had an agreement with the Soviet Union. Italy stood with Germany. Great read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    I have read almost every one of Churchill's books. Reading any of them is like going to a technicolor movie.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Doreen Petersen

    Really enjoyed this one! Now on to biography of George Washington!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Canfield

    The second book in Winston Churchill’s Second World War literary saga begins with the evacuation at Dunkirk, France. The German war machine is tearing through France at the book’s outset, forcing a complex series of reactions among some French leaders (like Marshal Petain and Pierre Laval) who want to cooperate, and others (like Charles De Gaulle) who seek to set up a resistance government in their North African colonies. Churchill delves into details about the Dunkirk evacuation, making it clea The second book in Winston Churchill’s Second World War literary saga begins with the evacuation at Dunkirk, France. The German war machine is tearing through France at the book’s outset, forcing a complex series of reactions among some French leaders (like Marshal Petain and Pierre Laval) who want to cooperate, and others (like Charles De Gaulle) who seek to set up a resistance government in their North African colonies. Churchill delves into details about the Dunkirk evacuation, making it clear that he did all he could to lend help to any French soldiers also trying to evacuate across the English Channel. Much space is taken up recounting the possibility of Operation Sea Lion panning out. This planned German invasion of the U.K. never actually occurs, although many towns on the island are relentlessly bombed by Luftwaffe nocturnal air raids. The Battle of Britain in 1940 is a harrowing portion of Their Finest Hour, no doubt contributing in a major way to the decision for the book's title. This fight between the German and English air forces is painted as the key to preventing Operation Sea Lion from materializing, as Hitler was reticent to launch a cross-channel invasion without adequate air support. Churchill writes that “from September 7 to November 3 (1940) an average of two hundred German bombers attacked London every night. The various preliminary raids which had been made upon our provincial cities in the previous three weeks had led to a considerable dispersion of our anti-aircraft artillery, and when London first became the main target there were but ninety-two guns in position.” This sort of eye for detail is commonplace throughout volumes one and two. The tension between keeping troops at home in case Operation Sea Lion is actually enacted versus the necessity of having troops of the British empire ready to fight in Egypt, Greece, and East Africa is played out in Churchill’s letters to his subordinates. As in the first volume, much of his correspondence with military and civilian leaders is reprinted word-for-word in volume two. Playing key roles in this capacity are Secretary of State for War Anthony Eden and General Hastings Ismay. The Italian invasion of Albania-and failed thrust into Greece-is one of many side theaters covered by Churchill. The strength ins mountain fighting shown by Greek general Alexandros Papagos to keep Mussolini’s men out of the cradle of democracy does not go unmentioned. The Fuhrer is, according to Churchill’s viewpoint, not happy with Mussolini for going all-out to invade Greece, thereby stretching thin the already vulnerable Italian military. Trying to make the most of the momentum gathered against the Italian military, Churchill delivers an address on December 23rd, 1940, directly to the Italian people, stressing the years of friendship between the two countries and trying to drive a wedge between her citizens and the Duce. The plan for Lend-Lease is laid out in the final chapters of Their Finest Hour. Churchill’s correspondence with the still (partially) neutral United States president Franklin Roosevelt, letters in which the British prime minister grants himself the title “former Naval person,” reveal just how much support the U.S. provided for Great Britain while they were potentially on the ropes. Roosevelt’s attitude toward Churchill at this time, a year prior to official entry into World War Two, is friendly but slightly reserved. The uneasiness in the U.S. over entering another European war is the likely explanation for such hesitancy. Germany signs the Tripartite Pact with Japan and Italy, leaving out a potential partner in the east of Europe whose absence no doubt did not go unnoticed by Stalin. In fact, Russia goes unmentioned in the vast majority of the book; placated by their nonaggression pact with Ribbentrop, the reader can assume that the great Bear is-for the time being-content with their spoils in Finland, Poland, and eastern Europe. But the Ribbentrop-Molotov inspired complacency is not shared by the Third Reich. When post-Battle of Britain Hitler temporarily gives up invading England, he then turns his attention to far eastern Europe (a scenario the astute British leader compares to Napoleon’s own European invasion strategy). Churchill seems almost disappointed Germany did not attempt the spring or summer 1941 cross-Channel invasion, stating that he believed Germany “would suffer the most terrific defeat and slaughter than any country had ever sustained in a specific military enterprise.” Whether or not his confidence was justified will never be known. The book begins with the Dunkirk evacuation and closes with strong hints that, given hints Operation Barbarossa will be taking place, the Soviet Union will no longer be on the sides of the wartime drama. Their Finest Hour will be a work some find tedious given the publication of firsthand letters, but those seeking to delve into the intricacies of British decision making during the second World War will enjoy it. A strong read for those seeking to do just that. -Andrew Canfield Denver, Co.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Casebolt

    By the end of June 1940, Britain stood virtually alone against Nazi Germany, stripped of arms and shoved back across the Channel to face the twin evils of conquest or capitulation. The French army, reputed to be the greatest land army on earth, had crumpled before the German onslaught in less than seven weeks. Few expected the lonely and battered island to remain standing for long, but then something remarkable happened: the islanders, quite simply and quite stubbornly, refused to quit. As the B By the end of June 1940, Britain stood virtually alone against Nazi Germany, stripped of arms and shoved back across the Channel to face the twin evils of conquest or capitulation. The French army, reputed to be the greatest land army on earth, had crumpled before the German onslaught in less than seven weeks. Few expected the lonely and battered island to remain standing for long, but then something remarkable happened: the islanders, quite simply and quite stubbornly, refused to quit. As the Battle of Britain raged in the air, as American aid steamed inexorably across the sea, and as the vast British Empire and Commonwealth geared up for total and global war, German hopes of a brief and victorious campaign flagged. This would prove to be Nazi Germany's final hour, and this would prove to be the British people's finest hour. The second book in Winston Churchill's history and memoir of the Second World War provides an illuminating window in the vast uncertainty, fear, and courage of the days during and after the fall of France. As Churchill presents it, most assumed the real war was over when France surrendered, and that British submission or subjuguation would follow swiftly. In truth, there's little reason history could not have gone that way. A lesser government could easily have chosen to cut its losses and strike a peace with Herr Hitler to mitigate the horrors of the Blitz or to prevent the dismemberment of Britain's empire. That they chose not to give in, and that the people sustained them in choosing to fight a war many outside Britain believed to be unwinnable, is a testament to the truth of Churchill's speech from which he drew the title of this volume. Victory over Nazi determination to remake the world in Hitler's image began with the pluck of a small island people who stared death in the face and denied its existence, who instead rose to the challenge of the hour, and who by their inability to admit defeat turned the course of history away from a new dark age and into broad, sunlit uplands.

  21. 5 out of 5

    S.P. Muir

    I was a little disappointed with this one - not with Winston's writing, you understand, but with the book itself. The paper was cheap, to say the least, and the print was often smudged and/or had parts of letters missing. I've seen old and clapped out typewriters do a better job! On content, it merited the same five stars I gave to volume 1 (an ancient and battered hardcover) but the print-job spoiled the experience somewhat. So four stars then. The content is perhaps a little dry for some tastes I was a little disappointed with this one - not with Winston's writing, you understand, but with the book itself. The paper was cheap, to say the least, and the print was often smudged and/or had parts of letters missing. I've seen old and clapped out typewriters do a better job! On content, it merited the same five stars I gave to volume 1 (an ancient and battered hardcover) but the print-job spoiled the experience somewhat. So four stars then. The content is perhaps a little dry for some tastes, but I do enjoy the great man's tone and turn of phrase. It works best if you read it with the narrative in your head doing an impression of his voice. Oh all right, perhaps not. It's full of facts and figures, maps and diagrams - some of which are a little hard to make sense of. I'm referring mainly to the maps here. Perhaps I'm cartographically dyslexic or something, but all the lines and squiggled writing squeezed into them made a bit of a mess - particularly considering the rubbish quality of the paper. Churchill's letters and telegrams (of which there are many - and I mean many) give an intriguing insight into not just what was going on, but exactly how the great man's mind was working as it all unfolded. This volume of the Nobel Prize winning collection covers the events of 1940 to early '41. It is intriguing and instructive, but since I pretty much knew it all beforehand, not as gripping as the first. It is nonetheless, a wonderfully written work that I highly recommend to all military history buffs.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tommy Kiedis

    Where to begin to describe the rich experience of reading Their Finest Hour, volume two of Churchill's account of WWII! My copy is marked throughout. Here are five reasons to read it: 1. To appreciate Churchill, the man, the statesman, and the leader. WSC's grasp of world affairs, war, and interactions is simply stunning. 2. To glean Lessons from Dunkirk. I wrote my book, "Churchill And Dunkirk: Finding Insight Inside Defeat" after gleaning so much leadership insight from his account. Many people Where to begin to describe the rich experience of reading Their Finest Hour, volume two of Churchill's account of WWII! My copy is marked throughout. Here are five reasons to read it: 1. To appreciate Churchill, the man, the statesman, and the leader. WSC's grasp of world affairs, war, and interactions is simply stunning. 2. To glean Lessons from Dunkirk. I wrote my book, "Churchill And Dunkirk: Finding Insight Inside Defeat" after gleaning so much leadership insight from his account. Many people are fascinated by the Dunkirk account, leaders learn from it. 3. To improve your communication by observing/learning from Churchill's mastery of the English language. There are quotes, maxims, and speeches worth returning to again and again; for instance the familiar: "I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears, and sweat." 5/13/40 4. To grow as a leader. The extensive appendices (about 100 pages) are primarily WSC's correspondence for a year. This section is leadership gold. Read to appreciate Churchill's prayers (not what you think) and how he devoted time to assessing, thinking, and holding others accountable. 5. To see WWII through the eyes of Great Britain. Churchill's theme: "How the British people held the fold ALONE till those who hitherto had been half blind were half ready."

  23. 5 out of 5

    John Devlin

    Delivers a stark appraisal of both British strengths and weaknesses in 1940 when Britain alone stood against Hitler, Italy and enigmatic foes Russia and Japan. Churchill's at his strongest when detailing his thoughts on how England's position was not as desperate as many thought - the ability to cross the Channel is highlighted - as is how long it took the Allies to overcome the same impediment until June of '44. Churchill is well aware of his place in history and some of the book can be seen as a Delivers a stark appraisal of both British strengths and weaknesses in 1940 when Britain alone stood against Hitler, Italy and enigmatic foes Russia and Japan. Churchill's at his strongest when detailing his thoughts on how England's position was not as desperate as many thought - the ability to cross the Channel is highlighted - as is how long it took the Allies to overcome the same impediment until June of '44. Churchill is well aware of his place in history and some of the book can be seen as a historical case being made. The inclusion of his cables to important parties can be interesting, but for the most part they get a bit dull; Churchill's ass-kissing to FDR is a model that should be studied by sycophants everywhere. Conclusion: Britain controlled the air over the channel. Germany, never a strong naval power, could not create the cordon sanitaire it needed to ferry such ginormous amounts of men and materiel. Failing that, Germany's use of the U-boat still managed to strangle England. Certainly, the US can take some praise for becoming the arsenal of democracy. Aid that had Britain lacked would probably have resulted in its destruction. Nevertheless, the US's role while integral was hardly heroic.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark Stidham

    For anyone wanting an understanding of the onset of WWII, this book is a good, perhaps indispensable volume. I have no doubts that opinion weaves into facts. But as a coherent recount of a principal player, it is comprehensive and unflinching. Churchill's ability to report on himself is extraordinary, his self confidence notwithstanding. As must have been evident at the time, the outcome of the war is far from certain. And so, even with the knowledge of the ultimate victory, there is communicate For anyone wanting an understanding of the onset of WWII, this book is a good, perhaps indispensable volume. I have no doubts that opinion weaves into facts. But as a coherent recount of a principal player, it is comprehensive and unflinching. Churchill's ability to report on himself is extraordinary, his self confidence notwithstanding. As must have been evident at the time, the outcome of the war is far from certain. And so, even with the knowledge of the ultimate victory, there is communicated the uncertainty and the danger of a Nazi dominated Europe. As a skeptic, I very much doubt the reality of something so ephemeral as a nation's spirit. But I am persuaded that a political body such as the UK in the years following the Nazi invasion of Poland, was capable of being led one way or another. Chamberlain was supported and pursued to the last an avoidance of war. Churchill was ever vigilant about the commitment to such a strategy if the adversary was as odious as Hitler. As a book reviewer, I want to express how impressed I am at Churchill's skill of organizing material and then putting it together. As a work of fiction, it would be legend. But it is history, making it all the more compelling.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marc Donner

    Like the first book, this volume is mostly a collection of Churchill's speeches and memos from the war archive, annotated with a bit of commentary. The core subtext of the book is, "Look how wonderful I was." There are quite a few useful takeaways from reading this book: 1 - write stuff down ... there is no way you can remember what you have done ... and conversations are subject to faulty memory, garbling, misinterpretation, and simple misrepresentation. 2 - the things that the War Cabinet worried Like the first book, this volume is mostly a collection of Churchill's speeches and memos from the war archive, annotated with a bit of commentary. The core subtext of the book is, "Look how wonderful I was." There are quite a few useful takeaways from reading this book: 1 - write stuff down ... there is no way you can remember what you have done ... and conversations are subject to faulty memory, garbling, misinterpretation, and simple misrepresentation. 2 - the things that the War Cabinet worried about that did NOT happen are fascinating. For example, in this volume Churchill spends a lot of time worrying about what Franco will do - will he ally with the Nazis and let Hitler take over Gibraltar? His appreciation of the savvyness of Franco's caginess and ability to avoid saying 'yes' to Hitler while not actually saying 'no' is fascinating. Churchill is an excellent writer - more in the clarity of his exposition than in the brilliance of his prose or any claims as stylist. I can see why he was a successful journalist and biographer earlier in his career. Nobel prize for literature? Well, they couldn't give him the Peace Prize.

  26. 4 out of 5

    James Richardson

    I just finished Volume II of Winston Churchill's six volume set on the Second World War. This one is entitled Their Finest Hour and deals with The Battle of Britain from many perspectives. Great Primary Source material for AP teachers to design document based questions from. Yes it had to suck being in London then which was a huge mistake by Hitler who should have concentrated the German air attack on British Industry and ports rather than civilians in London. It is an inspiring tale of how Brit I just finished Volume II of Winston Churchill's six volume set on the Second World War. This one is entitled Their Finest Hour and deals with The Battle of Britain from many perspectives. Great Primary Source material for AP teachers to design document based questions from. Yes it had to suck being in London then which was a huge mistake by Hitler who should have concentrated the German air attack on British Industry and ports rather than civilians in London. It is an inspiring tale of how Britain, all alone, won the Battle of Britain. It is amazing everything Churchill did to insure Britain's survival - not just military policies but all of his social and economic policies as well.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carlos Miguel

    This book of the series touches primarily the Battle of France and the Battle of Britain, and as its name says, 1940 was the best year for Hitler and his army. The tone is obscure and depressing, no really due to Churchill but because of the circumstances, the World was facing at the time. It is truly scary to see how 'easily' Hitler was able to control that year. It makes you wonder how close he really was of conquering all of Europe. Churchill's writing is immersive and sets the reader right in This book of the series touches primarily the Battle of France and the Battle of Britain, and as its name says, 1940 was the best year for Hitler and his army. The tone is obscure and depressing, no really due to Churchill but because of the circumstances, the World was facing at the time. It is truly scary to see how 'easily' Hitler was able to control that year. It makes you wonder how close he really was of conquering all of Europe. Churchill's writing is immersive and sets the reader right in the middle of the events. However, there were many details and numbers that instead of bringing the story alive it does the opposite by overwhelming the reader. Still, it is extremely worth it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Neil Limbert

    Superb!! You are following the trials and tribulations of the British Prime Minister from May 1940 to the end of 1940. The defeat of France; the entrance of Italy meant Britain and its commonwealth allies were alone against Germany and Italy. Then the possibility that Spain and Vichy France might join them. The prospect of invasion (which Churchill did not seem to fear at all. He thought the Nazis would meet with a bloody repulse ). Problems in the desert, West Africa and the middle east. Church Superb!! You are following the trials and tribulations of the British Prime Minister from May 1940 to the end of 1940. The defeat of France; the entrance of Italy meant Britain and its commonwealth allies were alone against Germany and Italy. Then the possibility that Spain and Vichy France might join them. The prospect of invasion (which Churchill did not seem to fear at all. He thought the Nazis would meet with a bloody repulse ). Problems in the desert, West Africa and the middle east. Churchill’s stinging memos to various ministers and chiefs! They must have feared receiving them but it kept them on their toes. No account of WW2 is complete without reading Churchill’s own version.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    Just fascinating.Love Winston's insider views, his soaring inspiration and his witty asides.He was a miraculous man..not without flaws but singular in his energy , scope of vision and commitment. He truly was born for that moment in history and the free world can thank him for it. The portion of the book "Alone" is quite moving as he chronicles the roughly 2 years that Britain was largely responsible for all the military resistance to Hitler. Imagine being bombed day and night and still striving Just fascinating.Love Winston's insider views, his soaring inspiration and his witty asides.He was a miraculous man..not without flaws but singular in his energy , scope of vision and commitment. He truly was born for that moment in history and the free world can thank him for it. The portion of the book "Alone" is quite moving as he chronicles the roughly 2 years that Britain was largely responsible for all the military resistance to Hitler. Imagine being bombed day and night and still striving to function as the point of liberty of the world's democracies.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Lots of things interrupted the reading for me here as this volume took over a year to finally complete. Interesting look at 1940 and as an American I love the viewpoint of the war from another angle with another country's lens over things that might get me to think about things in a new way. We also tend to feel, here in the US, that the war started in late 1941 because of the self-focused view, so there is not at much I have read about those years before we were sucked in. Looking forward to co Lots of things interrupted the reading for me here as this volume took over a year to finally complete. Interesting look at 1940 and as an American I love the viewpoint of the war from another angle with another country's lens over things that might get me to think about things in a new way. We also tend to feel, here in the US, that the war started in late 1941 because of the self-focused view, so there is not at much I have read about those years before we were sucked in. Looking forward to continuing through this series.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.