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No Home in a Homeland: Indigenous Peoples and Homelessness in the Canadian North

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The Dene, a traditionally nomadic people, have no word for homelessness, a rare condition in the Canadian North prior to the 1990s. Julia Christensen documents the rise of Indigenous homelessness and proposes solutions by interweaving analysis of the region's unique history with personal narratives of homeless men and women in two cities - Yellowknife and Inuvik. What emer The Dene, a traditionally nomadic people, have no word for homelessness, a rare condition in the Canadian North prior to the 1990s. Julia Christensen documents the rise of Indigenous homelessness and proposes solutions by interweaving analysis of the region's unique history with personal narratives of homeless men and women in two cities - Yellowknife and Inuvik. What emerges is a larger story of displacement and intergenerational trauma, hope and renewal. Understanding what it means to be homeless in the North and how Indigenous people think about home and homemaking is the first step, Christensen argues, on the path to decolonizing existing approaches and practices.


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The Dene, a traditionally nomadic people, have no word for homelessness, a rare condition in the Canadian North prior to the 1990s. Julia Christensen documents the rise of Indigenous homelessness and proposes solutions by interweaving analysis of the region's unique history with personal narratives of homeless men and women in two cities - Yellowknife and Inuvik. What emer The Dene, a traditionally nomadic people, have no word for homelessness, a rare condition in the Canadian North prior to the 1990s. Julia Christensen documents the rise of Indigenous homelessness and proposes solutions by interweaving analysis of the region's unique history with personal narratives of homeless men and women in two cities - Yellowknife and Inuvik. What emerges is a larger story of displacement and intergenerational trauma, hope and renewal. Understanding what it means to be homeless in the North and how Indigenous people think about home and homemaking is the first step, Christensen argues, on the path to decolonizing existing approaches and practices.

21 review for No Home in a Homeland: Indigenous Peoples and Homelessness in the Canadian North

  1. 4 out of 5

    MEGAN C

    HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Especially if you live in the Northwest Territories.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeneen Jensen

  3. 4 out of 5

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  4. 4 out of 5

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  10. 4 out of 5

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  17. 4 out of 5

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  18. 5 out of 5

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  19. 5 out of 5

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  20. 5 out of 5

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  21. 5 out of 5

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