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A Black Man in the White House: Barack Obama and the Triggering of America's Racial-Aversion Crisis

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In this book Cornell Belcher, award-winning pollster who twice served on President Barack Obama's presidential election team, presents stunning new research that illuminates just how deep and jagged these racial fault lines continue to be. He has surveyed battleground voters from 2008 through the 2016 primary season tracking racial aversion and its impact over the course o In this book Cornell Belcher, award-winning pollster who twice served on President Barack Obama's presidential election team, presents stunning new research that illuminates just how deep and jagged these racial fault lines continue to be. He has surveyed battleground voters from 2008 through the 2016 primary season tracking racial aversion and its impact over the course of the Obama presidency. Given the heightened racial aversion as a consequence of the first non-white male living in the White House, the rise of Trump was a predictable backlash. The election of the nation's first Black president does not mean that we live in a post-racial society; it means that we are now at a critical historical tipping point demographically and culturally in America--and this tipping point is indeed the wolf at the door for many anxious white Americans who are now politically behaving accordingly given this perceived threat. The panicked response of the waning white majority to what they perceive as the catastrophe of a Black president can be heard in every cry to "take back our country." This panic has resulted in the elevation of an overt and unapologetic racist as the nominee of one of America's major political parties.


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In this book Cornell Belcher, award-winning pollster who twice served on President Barack Obama's presidential election team, presents stunning new research that illuminates just how deep and jagged these racial fault lines continue to be. He has surveyed battleground voters from 2008 through the 2016 primary season tracking racial aversion and its impact over the course o In this book Cornell Belcher, award-winning pollster who twice served on President Barack Obama's presidential election team, presents stunning new research that illuminates just how deep and jagged these racial fault lines continue to be. He has surveyed battleground voters from 2008 through the 2016 primary season tracking racial aversion and its impact over the course of the Obama presidency. Given the heightened racial aversion as a consequence of the first non-white male living in the White House, the rise of Trump was a predictable backlash. The election of the nation's first Black president does not mean that we live in a post-racial society; it means that we are now at a critical historical tipping point demographically and culturally in America--and this tipping point is indeed the wolf at the door for many anxious white Americans who are now politically behaving accordingly given this perceived threat. The panicked response of the waning white majority to what they perceive as the catastrophe of a Black president can be heard in every cry to "take back our country." This panic has resulted in the elevation of an overt and unapologetic racist as the nominee of one of America's major political parties.

30 review for A Black Man in the White House: Barack Obama and the Triggering of America's Racial-Aversion Crisis

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

    The manipulation of ideology to restore the credit of a race as a whole is brilliantly detailed in these pages. The crucial question in Belcher's book is nothing more than the American destiny and future itself. He's not launching a campaign here but is determined to display the overall unhealthiness of the American political arena. It's interesting to read his substantial reluctance towards Trump's reputation while being unaware he would become the president soon after his book was released. How P The manipulation of ideology to restore the credit of a race as a whole is brilliantly detailed in these pages. The crucial question in Belcher's book is nothing more than the American destiny and future itself. He's not launching a campaign here but is determined to display the overall unhealthiness of the American political arena. It's interesting to read his substantial reluctance towards Trump's reputation while being unaware he would become the president soon after his book was released. How President Trump happened perhaps will never find its way into the historical records more accurately than through the murky shadow of what hovers behind the scenes depicted in Belcher's book. It's a must read to those who would like to try and understand where we are as a nation now and where we are heading.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steven Meyers

    Mr. Belcher's book was published soon after Donald Trump was selected as the Republican Party's presidential candidate. He correctly posited that it would be a close race and Ms.Clinton would not simply breeze to victory despite the Orange Tumor's overt racism and sexism. Hell, the author shows how Trump's racism was a major contributor to him winning the race. The social scientist sure had a better understanding on the lay of the political land than I did. The author's interest was in researchi Mr. Belcher's book was published soon after Donald Trump was selected as the Republican Party's presidential candidate. He correctly posited that it would be a close race and Ms.Clinton would not simply breeze to victory despite the Orange Tumor's overt racism and sexism. Hell, the author shows how Trump's racism was a major contributor to him winning the race. The social scientist sure had a better understanding on the lay of the political land than I did. The author's interest was in researching the attitudes about race and how it affected the public's perceptions of President Obama throughout his two terms as president as well as after he rocketed to national attention with his famous speech at the 2004 Democratic National Convention. His results convincingly refute the poppycock notion that we became a post-racial nation after Barack Obama moved into the White House. My wife and I are Caucasian and our two sons, who are now in their late teens, are African-American. Even here in tolerant overwhelmingly white Maine, we witnessed numerous examples of racial stereotyping towards our sons and Blacks as well as attitudes about our nation's first African-American president. 'A Black Man in the White House' is a small book written in an clear easy-to-understand style. The author avoids falling into academic three-hundred-syllable words and social science jargon. There is a few pages explaining the format of how he went about his study, but it was understandable as long as I slowed down the speed I was reading. Mr. Belcher also preps the reader by giving historical examples of how racism has shaped our nation. Some of the topics cover are the Republican's Southern Strategy, the Compromise of 1876, voter suppression laws, gerrymandering, the nature of race, tribalism, redlining, racial profiling, mass incarceration, substandard housing, blaming the victim, symbolic racism, and the condition in which racist people individuate. The one problem I had with the work are the handful of graphs used. They seem to have been originally presented in color but converted to black-and-white for the book. Some of the graph's keys were difficult to differentiate. The book validated many of my assumptions that racism and the ripple effects of slavery are still very much with us. Since I concluded 'A Black Man in the White House' with the attitude that Mr. Belcher somehow did a Vulcan mind meld with me and regurgitated my thoughts into his book, naturally, I think it's an excellent work. At only 189 pages and printed in large type, 'A Black Man in the White House' will not bore nor challenge even the most lackadaisical reader. It's informative and will help you understand who we are as nation when it comes to race.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Belcher takes 184 pages and breaks down a devastating and simple truth. Far from being the start of a post-racial America, the election of President Barack Obama uncovered deep racial resentment in the United States that led directly to the nomination of Donald Trump. Belcher was a DNC pollster and a short section of the book gets a bit into the statistical weeds, but for the most part he is the kind of writer I admire: clear and specific. He provides a fairly brief but detailed outline of racial Belcher takes 184 pages and breaks down a devastating and simple truth. Far from being the start of a post-racial America, the election of President Barack Obama uncovered deep racial resentment in the United States that led directly to the nomination of Donald Trump. Belcher was a DNC pollster and a short section of the book gets a bit into the statistical weeds, but for the most part he is the kind of writer I admire: clear and specific. He provides a fairly brief but detailed outline of racial relations in the United States and explains the ways in which the color line helped bring about the prophecy of "What's the Matter With Kansas?" et. al. Poor and middle-class whites will vote against their own economic interests not just to preserve the social order but to preserve white supremacy. Highly recommended. Could have used a sharper editor. I caught a bunch of simple spelling and grammatical errors, and the footnotes are misnumbered by one, so 145 actually corresponds to 146, etc.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sonja

    Every white person in America should be required to read this book. We are so far from being a harmonious racially diverse country and we have a long way to go. This book is a good way to get the conversation going and to head in the right direction which is to accept every person as an equal. I learned a lot and most of it was sad to me. Or else I got very angry at the way minorities are being treated - it is so beneath us (white people) and there is no reason for not treating everyone the way Every white person in America should be required to read this book. We are so far from being a harmonious racially diverse country and we have a long way to go. This book is a good way to get the conversation going and to head in the right direction which is to accept every person as an equal. I learned a lot and most of it was sad to me. Or else I got very angry at the way minorities are being treated - it is so beneath us (white people) and there is no reason for not treating everyone the way we want to be treated. We're all just people - no better, no worse than others.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Seth Johnson

    A well crafted argument. The author does a great job of reminding readers how we got here and points toward the path to redemption and recovery for our country. I did feel that the empirical section near the end dragged a bit and that some of numbers he used to make his case were less persuasive than the picture he painted with his words.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tom Giles

    Although written before the election and based on research into how President Obama was perceived by different voting blocks, the results are a very potent description of attitudes surrounding Trump and his voters.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gerry Sacco

    Powerful read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    David

    4.5

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Excellent book Belcher's book is well written, well researched and doesn't gloss over social and racial truths of our country. He builds a strong case for his conclusions and for insightful recommendations for healing. A must read--especially for Trump voters who can better understand why they think as they do--without judgment of them--with hope that they won't do it again.p

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emilia

    I love this book. Concise and profound, it numerically lays bare what the true reactions were to America's first black president.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ed Schneider

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brad

  13. 4 out of 5

    Henry

  14. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jay Williams

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rick

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bob Laubach

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laura Costanzo

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Flieger

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Mcwilliams

  21. 5 out of 5

    Juan Villegas jr.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Terri Butts

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rev. Haberer

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alex Tolbert

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aisha

  26. 5 out of 5

    Len O'Hara

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jarrett Brown

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cate Quintara

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

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